Yearbook of Morphology 2005

Yearbook of Morphology 2005

In addition to a selection of papers in the Yearbook of Morphology 2004 , a number of papers presented at the 4th MMM meeting have been made available in the form specified above . These proceedings contain the following articles ...

Author: Geert Booij

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 1402040652

Category: Computers

Page: 316

View: 377

A revival of interest in morphology has occurred during recent years. The periodical Yearbook of Morphology, published since 1988, has proven to be an eminent support for this upswing of morphological research, and has shown that morphology is central to present-day linguistic theorizing. In the Yearbook of Morphology 2005 a number of important theoretical issues are discussed: the role of inflectional paradigms in morphological analysis, the differences between words and affixes, and the adequacy of competing models of word structure. In addition, the role of phonological factors in shaping complex words is discussed. Evidence for particular positions defended in this volume is taken from a wide variety of languages. This volume is of interest to those working in theoretical, descriptive and historical linguistics, morphologists, phonologists, computational linguists, and psycholinguists. Beginning with Volume 16 (2006) the Yearbook of Morphology continues as a journal with the title: Morphology. This is the only journal entirely devoted to the study of linguistic morphology. The journal is available online as well as in print. Visit the journal at: www.springer.com/11525 or click on the link in the top right hand corner.
Categories: Computers

Yearbook of Morphology

Yearbook of Morphology

Author: G. E. Booij

Publisher:

ISBN: OCLC:605160550

Category: Grammar, Comparative and general

Page: 319

View: 357

Categories: Grammar, Comparative and general

The Emergence of Protolanguage

The Emergence of Protolanguage

Aronoff, M., Meir, I., Padden, C., & Sandler, W. (2004). Morphological universals and the sign language type. In G. Booj & J. van Marle (Eds.), Yearbook of morphology 2004 (pp. 19–39). Dordrecht/Boston: Kluwer Academic Publishers.

Author: Michael A. Arbib

Publisher: John Benjamins Publishing

ISBN: 9789027222541

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 181

View: 205

Somewhere and somehow, in the 5 to 7 million years since the last common ancestors of humans and the great apes, our ancestors got language. The authors of this volume all agree that there was no single mutation or cultural innovation that took our ancestors directly from a limited system of a few vocalizations (primarily innate) and gestures (some learned) to language. They further agree to use the term protolanguage for the beginnings of an open system of symbolic communication that provided the bridge to the use of fully expressive languages, rich in both lexicon and grammar. But here consensus ends, and the theories presented here range from the "compositional view" that protolanguage was based primarily on words akin to the nouns and verbs, etc., we know today with only syntax lacking to the "holophrastic view" that protolanguage used protowords which had no meaningful subunits which might nonetheless refer to complex but significantly recurrent events. The present volume does not decide the matter but it does advance our understanding. The lack of any direct archaeological record of protolanguage might seem to raise insuperable difficulties. However, this volume exhibits the diversity of methodologies that can be brought to bear in developing datasets that can be used to advance the debate.These articles were originally published as "Interaction Studies" 9:1 (2008)."
Categories: Language Arts & Disciplines

Morphology

Morphology

Lieber, R. (2004), Morphology and Lexical Semantics, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. ... in Dutch: A study in lexical-conceptual structure', in G. Booij and J. van Marle (eds), Yearbook of Morphology 1992, Dordrecht: Kluwer, pp.

Author: Antonio Fࡲegas

Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

ISBN: 9780748656288

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 224

View: 495

Tackling theoretical approaches including Construction Grammar and the Minimalist Program, this volume focuses on processes and phenomena. Each chapter covers the main concepts through example data, before discussing the pros and cons of the approach. Topics covered include: units, inflection, derivation, compounding, the Lexical Integrity Hypothesis and the interfaces of morphology with phonology and semantics. Taking your understanding of the form and meaning of words to the next level, this book is ideal for linguistics students interested in learning more about morphology.Key Features* Discusses variety of theories* Exercises and further reading in each chapter
Categories: Language Arts & Disciplines

The Evolution of Morphology

The Evolution of Morphology

(2004). Evolutionary Phonology: The Emergence of Sound Patterns. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. ... Yearbook of Morphology 2004. ... Stem alternants as morphological signata: evidence from blur avoidance in Polish nouns.

Author: Andrew Carstairs-McCarthy

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 9780191559624

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 272

View: 129

This book considers the evolution of the grammatical structure of words in the more general contexts of human evolution and the origins of language. The consensus in many fields is that language is well designed for its purpose, and became so either through natural selection or by virtue of non-biological constraints on how language must be structured. Andrew Carstairs-McCarthy argues that in certain crucial respects language is not optimally designed. This can be seen, he suggests, in the existence of not one but two kinds of grammatical organization - syntax and morphology - and in the morphological and morpho-phonological complexity which leads to numerous departures from the one-form-one-meaning principle. Having discussed the issue of good and bad design in a wider biological context, the author shows that conventional explanations for the nature of morphology do not work. Its poor design features arose, he argues, from two characteristics present when the ancestors of modern humans had a vocabulary but no grammar. One of these was a synonymy-avoidance expectation, while the other was an articulatory and phonological apparatus that encouraged the development of new synonyms. Morphology developed in response to these conflicting pressures. In this stimulating and carefully argued account Professor McCarthy offers a powerful challenge to conventional views of the relationship between syntax and morphology, to the adaptationist view of language evolution, and to the notion that language in some way reflects 'laws of form'. This fundamental contribution to understanding the nature and evolution of language will be of wide interest to linguists of all theoretical persuasions as well as to scholars in cognitive science and anthropology.
Categories: Language Arts & Disciplines

The Interplay of Morphology and Phonology

The Interplay of Morphology and Phonology

... Yearbook of Morphology 2004:317-19. Bochner, Harry (1992). Simplicity in generative morphology, Publications in Linguistic Sciences 37. Berlin: Walter de Gruyter. Bogoras, Waldemar (1969). 'Chukchee', in Franz Boas (ed.) ...

Author: Sharon Inkelas

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 9780191019401

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 368

View: 968

This book presents a phenomenon-oriented survey of the interaction between phonology and morphology. It examines the ways in which morphology, i.e. word formation, demonstrates sensitivity to phonological information and how phonological patterns can be sensitive to morphology. Chapters focus on morphologically conditioned phonology, process morphology, prosodic templates, reduplication, infixation, phonology-morphology interleaving effects, prosodic-morphological mismatches, ineffability, and other cases of phonology-morphology interaction. The overview discusses the relevance of a variety of phenomena for theoretical issues in the field. These include the debate over item-based vs. realizational approaches to morphology; the question of whether cyclic effects can be subsumed under paradigmatic effects; whether reduplication is phonological copying or morphological doubling; whether infixation and suppletive allomorphy are phonologically optimizing, and more. The book is intended to be used in graduate or advanced undergraduate courses or as a reference for those pursuing individual topics in the phonology-morphology interface.
Categories: Language Arts & Disciplines

Universals of Language Today

Universals of Language Today

A-morphous Morphology. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Anderson, Stephen R. 2004. Morphological universals and diachrony. In Yearbook of Morphology 2004, eds. Geert Booij and Jaap van Marle 1–18. Dordrecht: Springer.

Author: Sergio Scalise

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9781402088254

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 281

View: 483

This book collects the contributions presented at the international congress held at the University of Bologna in January 2007, where leading scholars of different persuasions and interests offered an up-to-date overview of the current status of the research on linguistic universals. The papers that make up the volume deal with both theoretical and empirical issues, and range over various domains, covering not only morphology and syntax, which were the major focus of Greenberg’s seminal work, but also phonology and semantics, as well as diachrony and second language acquisition. Diverse perspectives illustrate and discuss a huge number of phenomena from a wide variety of languages, not only exploring the way research on universals - tersects with different subareas of linguistics, but also contributing to the ongoing debate between functional and formal approaches to explaining the universals of language. This stimulating reading for scientists, researchers and postgraduate students in linguistics shows how different, but not irreconcilable, modes of explanation can complement each other, both offering fresh insights into the investigation of unity and diversity in languages, and pointing to exciting areas for future research. • A fresh and up-to-date survey of the present state of research on Universals of Language in an international context, with original contributions from leading specialists in the eld. • First-hand accounts of substantive ndings and theoretical observations in diff- ent subareas of linguistics. • Huge number of linguistic phenomena and data from diffferent languages a- lyzed and discussed in detail.
Categories: Language Arts & Disciplines

Defaults in Morphological Theory

Defaults in Morphological Theory

In G. Booij and J. van Marle (eds), Yearbook of Morphology 2004 (Dordrecht: Kluwer), 137–75. Maiden, Martin (2011), 'Morphophonological innovation'. In M. Maiden, J. C. Smith, and A. Ledgeway (eds), The Cambridge History of the Romance ...

Author: Nikolas Gisborne

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780198712329

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 352

View: 362

Chapters in this volume describe morphology using four different frameworks that have an architectural property in common: they all use defaults as a way of discovering and presenting systematicity in the least systematic component of grammar. These frameworks - Construction Morphology, Network Morphology, Paradigm-function Morphology, and Word Grammar - display key differences in how they constrain the use and scope of defaults, and in the morphological phenomena that they address. An introductory chapter presents an overview of defaults in linguistics and specifically in morphology. In subsequent chapters, key proponents of the four frameworks seek to answer questions about the role of defaults in the lexicon, including: Does a defaults-based account of language have implications for the architecture of the grammar, particularly the proposal that morphology is an autonomous component? How does a default differ from the canonical or prototypical in morphology? Do defaults have a psychological basis? And how do defaults help us understand language as a sign-based system that is flawed, where the one to one association of form and meaning breaks down in the morphology?
Categories: Language Arts & Disciplines

Morphological Metatheory

Morphological Metatheory

In Yearbook of Morphology 2002, Geert Booij & Jaap van Marle (eds), 245–281. Dordrecht: Kluwer. doi:10.1007/0-306-48223-1_8 Inkelas, Sharon. 1989. Prosodic Constituency in the Lexicon. Ph.D. dissertation, Stanford University.

Author: Daniel Siddiqi

Publisher: John Benjamins Publishing Company

ISBN: 9789027267122

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 547

View: 960

The field of morphology is particularly heterogeneous. Investigators differ on key points at every level of theory. These divisions are not minor issues about technical implementation, but rather are foundational issues that mold the underlying anatomy of any theory. The field has developed very rapidly both theoretically and methodologically, giving rise to many competing theories and varied hypotheses. Many drastically different and often contradictory models and foundational hypotheses have been proposed. Theories diverge with respect to everything from foundational architectural assumptions to the specific combinatorial mechanisms used to derive complex words. Today these distinct models of word-formation largely exist in parallel, mostly without proponents confronting or discussing these differences in any major forum. After forty years of fast-paced growth in the field, morphologists are in need of a moment to take a breath and survey the drastically different points of view within the field. This volume provides such a moment.
Categories: Language Arts & Disciplines

Word and Paradigm Morphology

Word and Paradigm Morphology

In Yearbook of Morphology 2004 (eds. G. Booij and J. van Marle), pp. 177–228. Springer, Dordrecht. Lyons, John (1963). Structural Semantics. Blackwell, Oxford. Macdonnell, Arthur A. (1927). A Sanskrit Grammar for Students (3rd edn.).

Author: James P. Blevins

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199593545

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 249

View: 526

This volume discusses the general perspectives on linguistic morphology offered by word and paradigm models. James Blevins places these models in the larger context of the lineage that extends from classical grammars to current information-theoretic and discriminative learning paradigms.
Categories: Language Arts & Disciplines