Wolf Hall Companion

Wolf Hall Companion

Ulf Hall, Wulfhall or Wolf Hall became the premier estate of the Seymour family. It was not until the early 16th century that family fortunes improved significantly, with the marriage in 1494 of John Seymour and Margaret (or ...

Author: Lauren Mackay

Publisher: Batsford

ISBN: 9781849946858

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 258

View: 410

An accessible and authoritative companion to the bestselling Wolf Hall trilogy by Hilary Mantel, published after the third and final book, The Mirror and the Light. Wolf Hall Companion gives an historian's view of what we know about Thomas Cromwell, one of the most powerful men of the Tudor age and the central character in Mantel’s Wolf Hall trilogy. Covering the key court and political characters from the books, this companion guide also works as a concise Tudor history primer. Alongside Thomas Cromwell, the author explores characters including Anne Boleyn, Thomas Cranmer, Jane Seymour, Henry VIII, Thomas Howard, Cardinal Wolsey and Richard Fox. The important places in the court of Henry VIII are introduced and put into context, including Hampton Court, the Tower of London, Cromwell's home Austin Friars, and of course Wolf Hall. The author explores not only the real history of these people and places, but also Hilary Mantel's interpretation of them.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Origin and Ellipsis in the Writing of Hilary Mantel

Origin and Ellipsis in the Writing of Hilary Mantel

5 Hilary Mantel and Mike Poulton, Wolf Hall & Bring Up the Bodies (London: Nick Hern Books, Fourth Estate, 2014), p. 160. Wolf Hall, Act Four, Scene Twenty-Eight. 6 Wolf Hall & Bring Up the Bodies, p. 223. Bring Up the Bodies, ...

Author: Eileen Pollard

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9780429535819

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 196

View: 548

Origin and Ellipsis in the Writing of Hilary Mantel provokes a re-engagement with Derrida’s thinking in contemporary literature, with particular emphasis on the philosopher’s preoccupation with the process of writing. This is the first book-length study of Mantel’s writing, not just in terms of Derrida’s thought, but through any critical perspective or lens to date.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Adaptation Awards Culture and the Value of Prestige

Adaptation  Awards Culture  and the Value of Prestige

Cromwell's servant Christophe in Wolf Hall, for instance, functions in some ways like The Common Man in Bolt's play. His role is greatly expanded in the plays (compared to the novels), and one of his functions is to act as “the voice of ...

Author: Colleen Kennedy-Karpat

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9783319528540

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 239

View: 516

This book explores the intersection between adaptation studies and what James F. English has called the “economy of prestige,” which includes formal prize culture as well as less tangible expressions such as canon formation, fandom, authorship, and performance. The chapters explore how prestige can affect many facets of the adaptation process, including selection, approach, and reception. The first section of this volume deals directly with cycles of influence involving prizes such as the Pulitzer, the Man Booker, and other major awards. The second section focuses on the juncture where adaptation, the canon, and awards culture meet, while the third considers alternative modes of locating and expressing prestige through adapted and adaptive intertexts. This book will be of interest to students and scholars of adaptation, cultural sociology, film, and literature.
Categories: Performing Arts

Contemporary British Novel Since 2000

Contemporary British Novel Since 2000

Frances Wilson, 'Bring up the Bodies by Hilary Mantel – Review', The Guardian, 13 May 2012, <http://www.theguardian.com/books/2012/may/13/bring-up-bodies-hilary-mantel-review> (last accessed 13 June 2016). See also Tayler, 'Wolf Hall'; ...

Author: James Acheson

Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

ISBN: 9781474403740

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 224

View: 556

Focuses on the novels published since 2000 by twenty major British novelistsThe Contemporary British Novel Since 2000 is divided into five parts, with the first part examining the work of four particularly well-known and highly regarded twenty-first century writers: Ian McEwan, David Mitchell, Hilary Mantel and Zadie Smith. It is with reference to each of these novelists in turn that the terms arealist, apostmodernist, ahistorical and apostcolonialist fiction are introduced, while in the remaining four parts, other novelists are discussed and the meaning of the terms amplified. From the start it is emphasised that these terms and others often mean different things to different novelists, and that the complexity of their novels often obliges us to discuss their work with reference to more than one of the terms.Also discusses the works of: Maggie OFarrell, Sarah Hall, A.L. Kennedy, Alan Warner, Ali Smith, Kazuo Ishiguro, Kate Atkinson, Salman Rushdie, Adam Foulds, Sarah Waters, James Robertson, Mohsin Hamid, Andrea Levy, and Aminatta Forna.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Extraterritorial

Extraterritorial

In her notes to the Royal Shakespeare Company's stage adaptation of Wolf Hall, Mantel describes Austin Friars, possibly drawing on Robertson's doctoral thesis, as “a great ministerial household, a power centre, cosmopolitan and full of ...

Author: Matthew Hart

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 9780231547802

Category: Literary Criticism

Page:

View: 709

The future of fiction is neither global nor national. Instead, Matthew Hart argues, it is trending extraterritorial. Extraterritorial spaces fall outside of national borders but enhance state power. They cut across geography and history but do not point the way to a borderless new world. They range from the United Nations headquarters and international waters to CIA black sites and the departure zones at international airports. The political geography of the present, Hart shows, has come to resemble a patchwork of such spaces. Hart reveals extraterritoriality’s centrality to twenty-first-century art and fiction. He shows how extraterritorial fictions expose the way states construct “global” space in their own interests. Extraterritorial novels teach us not to mistake cracks or gradations in political geography for a crisis of the state. Hart demonstrates how the unstable character of many twenty-first-century aesthetic forms can be traced to the increasingly extraterritorial nature of contemporary political geography. Discussing writers such as Margaret Atwood, J. G. Ballard, Amitav Ghosh, Chang-rae Lee, Hilary Mantel, and China Miéville, as well as artists like Hito Steyerl and Mark Wallinger, Hart combines lively critical readings of contemporary novels with historical and theoretical discussions about sovereignty, globalization, cosmopolitanism, and postcolonialism. Extraterritorial presents a new theory of literature that explains what happens when dreams of an open, connected world confront the reality of mobile, elastic, and tenacious borders.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Reading Hilary Mantel

Reading Hilary Mantel

overlook a multiplicity of less traditional spectres which saturate Wolf Hall. To do so is to fail to appreciate the subtle and nuanced discussions orchestrated within the text, discussions whose impacts are felt far beyond questions of ...

Author: Lucy Arnold

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781350072572

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 240

View: 415

From the ghosts which reside in Midlands council houses in Every Day is Mother's Day to the resurrected historical dead of the Booker Prize-winning Wolf Hall and Bring up the Bodies, the writings of Hilary Mantel are often haunted by supernatural figures. One of the first book-length studies of the writer's work, Reading Hilary Mantel explores the importance of ghosts in the full range of her fiction and non-fiction writing and their political, social and ethical resonances. Combining material from original interviews with the author herself with psychoanalytic, historicist and deconstructivist critical perspectives, Reading Hilary Mantel is a landmark study of this important and popular contemporary novelist.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Hilary Mantel

Hilary Mantel

Christopher Taylor describes Wolf Hall as 'a non-frothy historical novel', situating the text in opposition to a prevalent critical discourse in which the genre is 'frowned on' and 'disapproved of' ( 2009 : 9).

Author: Eileen Pollard

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781474296526

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 184

View: 376

The first British writer to win the Booker Prize on two separate occasions - for Wolf Hall in 2009 and its sequel Bring Up the Bodies in 2012 - Hilary Mantel is one of the most popular and lauded novelists working today. Hilary Mantel: Contemporary Critical Perspectives is a critical guide to Mantel's work, from her earliest novels through to her recent Thomas Cromwell fictions, including analysis of her short story collections and memoir. Chapters cover such topics as Mantel's engagement with history to her deployment of the spectral and her extensive intertextuality. The book also includes a comprehensive interview with Mantel herself that explores her work and career.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Thomas More

Thomas More

Mantel, Wolf Hall, 522. 97. John Guy, The Public Career of Sir Thomas More (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1980), 75–76. 98. Ibid., 76–77. 99. Wegemer, Statesmanship, 189. 100. Wegemer and Smith, eds., A Thomas More Source Book, 145.

Author: Travis Curtright

Publisher: Lexington Books

ISBN: 9781498522274

Category: Political Science

Page: 244

View: 419

This collection of essays addresses Thomas More’s guiding principles of leadership through his writings, actions, and in recent artistic depictions.
Categories: Political Science

Wolf Hall

Wolf Hall

In this book, "the opulant, brutal world of the Tudors comes to glittering, bloody life.

Author: Hilary Mantel

Publisher: HarperCollins UK

ISBN: 9780007230204

Category: Fiction

Page: 702

View: 188

In this book, "the opulant, brutal world of the Tudors comes to glittering, bloody life. It is the backdrop to the rise and rise of Thomas Cromwell: lowborn boy, charmer, bully, master of deadly intrigue, and, finally, most powerful of all Henry VIII's courtiers."--Page 4 of cover.
Categories: Fiction

Exoticizing the Past in Contemporary Neo Historical Fiction

Exoticizing the Past in Contemporary Neo Historical Fiction

In Wolf Hall Mantel reanimates the figure of Cromwell, traditionally shadowed by the imposing presence of Sir ThomasMore, andin Bring Up the Bodies she proposes a new viewof AnneBoleyn, a figurewho,in Mantel's words, 'isstill changing ...

Author: E. Rousselot

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9781137375209

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 197

View: 943

This collection of essays is dedicated to examining the recent literary phenomenon of the 'neo-historical' novel, a sub-genre of contemporary historical fiction which critically re-imagines specific periods of history.
Categories: Literary Criticism