White Like Me

Reflections on Race from a Privileged Son

Author: Tim Wise

Publisher: Soft Skull Press

ISBN: 1593764707

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 208

View: 6292

DOWNLOAD NOW »

With a new preface and updated chapters, White Like Me is one-part memoir, one-part polemical essay collection. It is a personal examination of the way in which racial privilege shapes the daily lives of white Americans in every realm: employment, education, housing, criminal justice, and elsewhere. Using stories from his own life, Tim Wise demonstrates the ways in which racism not only burdens people of color, but also benefits, in relative terms, those who are “white like him.” He discusses how racial privilege can harm whites in the long run and make progressive social change less likely. He explores the ways in which whites can challenge their unjust privileges, and explains in clear and convincing language why it is in the best interest of whites themselves to do so. Using anecdotes instead of stale statistics, Wise weaves a narrative that is at once readable and yet scholarly, analytical and yet accessible.
Release

White like me

reflections on race from a privileged son

Author: Tim J. Wise

Publisher: Soft Skull Pr

ISBN: 9781933368993

Category: Social Science

Page: 191

View: 1538

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Racial privilege shapes the lives of white Americans in every facet of life, from employment and education to housing and criminal justice. Using stories from his own life, Tim Wise shows that racism not only burdens people of color, but also benefits those who are "white like him" — whether or not they’re actively racist. Using stories instead of stale statistics, Wise weaves a compelling narrative that assesses the magnitude of racial privilege and is at once readable and scholarly, analytical yet accessible.
Release

Neo-segregation Narratives

Jim Crow in Post-civil Rights American Literature

Author: Brian Norman

Publisher: University of Georgia Press

ISBN: 0820337358

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 214

View: 1787

DOWNLOAD NOW »

This study of what Brian Norman terms a neo-segregation narrative tradition examines literary depictions of life under Jim Crow that were written well after the civil rights movement. From Toni Morrison's first novel, The Bluest Eye, to bestselling black fiction of the 1980s to a string of recent work by black and nonblack authors and artists, Jim Crow haunts the post-civil rights imagination. Norman traces a neo-segregation narrative tradition--one that developed in tandem with neo-slave narratives--by which writers return to a moment of stark de jure segregation to address contemporary concerns about national identity and the persistence of racial divides. These writers upset dominant national narratives of achieved equality, portraying what are often more elusive racial divisions in what some would call a postracial present. Norman examines works by black writers such as Lorraine Hansberry, Toni Morrison, Alice Walker, David Bradley, Wesley Brown, Suzan-Lori Parks, and Colson Whitehead, films by Spike Lee, and other cultural works that engage in debates about gender, Black Power, blackface minstrelsy, literary history, and whiteness and ethnicity. Norman also shows that multiethnic writers such as Sherman Alexie and Tom Spanbauer use Jim Crow as a reference point, extending the tradition of William Faulkner's representations of the segregated South and John Howard Griffin's notorious account of crossing the color line from white to black in his 1961 work Black Like Me.
Release

Color by Number

Understanding Racism Through Facts and Stats on Children

Author: Art Munin

Publisher: Stylus Publishing, LLC

ISBN: 1579226388

Category: Education

Page: 132

View: 1256

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Many deny that racism remains pervasive in America today. How can we open eyes to the continuing disadvantages that keep many people of color from fulfilling their potential, and having an equal chance to achieve the “American Dream”? By presenting the impact of racism on the most innocent and powerless members of society– children of color – in the form of statistics, this book aims to change attitudes and perceptions. Children have no say about where they are born or what school they attend. They have no control over whether or not they get medical treatment when they fall ill. They can’t avoid exposure if their home is in a community blighted by pollution. The questions this book poses are: What responsibility do we expect children to take for their life circumstances? Do those conditions blight their futures? If they aren’t responsible, who is? Are some in society privileged and complicit in denying people of color the advantages and protections from harm most of us take for granted? Through the cumulative effect of official statistics rather than the more usual reliance on anecdote – by taking a “show me the numbers!” approach – this book will open minds, start conversations, and even prompt readers to take action. While the numbers are official they are often hard to find because they are scattered across so many sources. Art Munin has not only done the research, but shows the reader how to locate data on racial and socio-economic disparities, and develop her or his own case or classroom project. Color by Number takes as its metaphorical point of departure the familiar children’s activity of that name. Art Munin has painstakingly researched and gathered the numbers, and has filled in the spaces to reveal the hidden picture of racism in America from the perspectives of health, the environment, the law, and education. This book is intended as a fact-based, antiracism text for diversity and social justice courses, and as a resource for diversity and social justice educators as they craft their race, racism, and White privilege curricula. Art Munin’s multidisciplinary approach – drawing on scholarly work from medicine, law, sociology, psychology, and education – provides the reader with a comprehensive way to understand the pervasiveness of racism.
Release

Articulate While Black

Barack Obama, Language, and Race in the U.S.

Author: H. Samy Alim,Geneva Smitherman

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199985987

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 224

View: 2027

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Barack Obama is widely considered one of the most powerful and charismatic speakers of our age. Without missing a beat, he often moves between Washington insider talk and culturally Black ways of speaking--as shown in a famous YouTube clip, where Obama declined the change offered to him by a Black cashier in a Washington, D.C. restaurant with the phrase, "Nah, we straight." In Articulate While Black, two renowned scholars of Black Language address language and racial politics in the U.S. through an insightful examination of President Barack Obama's language use--and America's response to it. In this eloquently written and powerfully argued book, H. Samy Alim and Geneva Smitherman provide new insights about President Obama and the relationship between language and race in contemporary society. Throughout, they analyze several racially loaded, cultural-linguistic controversies involving the President--from his use of Black Language and his "articulateness" to his "Race Speech," the so-called "fist-bump," and his relationship to Hip Hop Culture. Using their analysis of Barack Obama as a point of departure, Alim and Smitherman reveal how major debates about language, race, and educational inequality erupt into moments of racial crisis in America. In challenging American ideas about language, race, education, and power, they help take the national dialogue on race to the next level. In much the same way that Cornel West revealed nearly two decades ago that "race matters," Alim and Smitherman in this groundbreaking book show how deeply "language matters" to the national conversation on race--and in our daily lives.
Release

Speaking Treason Fluently

Anti-Racist Reflections From an Angry White Male

Author: Tim Wise

Publisher: Soft Skull Press

ISBN: 1593762070

Category: Social Science

Page: 352

View: 5365

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Presents a collection of essays that cover the topics of white privilege, racism, and responsibility in the United States.
Release

Everyday Antiracism

Getting Real About Race in School

Author: Mica Pollock

Publisher: The New Press

ISBN: 1595585672

Category: Education

Page: 416

View: 6155

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Which acts by educators are “racist” and which are “antiracist”? How can an educator constructively discuss complex issues of race with students and colleagues? In Everyday Antiracism leading educators deal with the most challenging questions about race in school, offering invaluable and effective advice. Contributors including Beverly Daniel Tatum, Sonia Nieto, and Pedro Noguera describe concrete ways to analyze classroom interactions that may or may not be “racial,” deal with racial inequality and “diversity,” and teach to high standards across racial lines. Topics range from using racial incidents as teachable moments and responding to the “n-word” to valuing students’ home worlds, dealing daily with achievement gaps, and helping parents fight ethnic and racial misconceptions about their children. Questions following each essay prompt readers to examine and discuss everyday issues of race and opportunity in their own classrooms and schools. For educators and parents determined to move beyond frustrations about race, Everyday Antiracism is an essential tool.
Release

New Horizons in Multicultural Counseling

Author: Gerald Monk,John Winslade,Stacey Sinclair

Publisher: SAGE

ISBN: 1412916763

Category: Psychology

Page: 510

View: 1242

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Offering a fresh theoretical perspective and packed with powerful strategies, New Horizons in Multicultural Counseling clarifies the complexity of culture in our increasingly globalized society. Counselors will find practice-based strategies to help them progress in their clinical practice and gain cultural competence.
Release

Talking About Race

Alleviating the Fear

Author: Steven Grineski,Julie Landsman,Robert Simmons III

Publisher: Stylus Publishing, LLC

ISBN: 1579225624

Category: Education

Page: 340

View: 2439

DOWNLOAD NOW »

What is it that gives many of us White people a visceral fear about discussing race? Do you realize that being able to not think about or talk about it is a uniquely White experience? Do you warn your children about how people might react to them; find store staff following or watching you; get stopped by the police for no reason? The students of color in your classroom experience discrimination every day, in small and large ways. They don’t often see themselves represented in their textbooks, and encounter hostility in school, and outside. For them race is a constant reality, and an issue they need, and want, to discuss. Failure to do so can inhibit their academic performance. Failure to discuss race prevents White students from getting a real, critical and deep understanding of our society and their place in it. It is essential for the well-being of all students that they learn to have constructive conversations about the history of race in this country, the impact of racism on different ethnic communities, and how those communities and cultures contribute to society. The need to model for our students how to talk openly and comfortably about race is critical in America today, but it is still an issue that is difficult to tackle. To overcome the common fear of discussing race, of saying “something wrong”, this book brings together over thirty contributions by teachers and students of different ethnicities and races who offer their experiences, ideas, and advice. With passion and sensitivity they: cover such topics as the development of racial consciousness and identity in children; admit their failures and continuing struggles; write about creating safe spaces and the climate that promotes thoughtful discussion; model self-reflection; demonstrate the importance of giving voice to students; recount how they responded to racial incidents and used current affairs to discuss oppression; describe courses and strategies they have developed; explain the “n” word; present exercises; and pose questions. For any teacher grappling with addressing race in the classroom, and for pre-service teachers confronting their anxieties about race, this book offers a rich resource of insights, approaches and guidance that will allay fears, and provide the reflective practitioner with the confidence to initiate and respond to discussion of race, from the pre-school and elementary classroom through high school.
Release

Introduction to Multicultural Counseling for Helping Professionals

Author: Graciela L. Orozco,Wanda M. L. Lee,John A. Blando,Bita Shooshani

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1136262393

Category: Psychology

Page: 326

View: 1022

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Introduction to Multicultural Counseling for Helping Professionals is the essential introductory text in the area of multicultural counseling. Providing a broad survey of counseling techniques for different ethnic, religious and social groups, it is at once thorough and easily understood. Beyond its topic-specific sections, Introduction to Multicultural Counseling for Helping Professionals also includes chapters on the theory and history of multicultural counseling, expanded cultural resources, and an appendix explaining its interrelationship with CACREP accreditation requirements. Now in its third edition, Introduction to Multicultural Counseling for Helping Professionals is updated and revised to reflect the changing landscape of the 21st century. It contains updated statistics on fluid demographics in the U.S., a stronger social-justice perspective throughout the text, and a new chapter on counseling undocumented immigrants. The text is supplemented with online materials, including updated PowerPoint slides with discussion questions and classroom activities, a testbank with new questions for each chapter, and a sample course syllabus, each of which is presented in an updated, more attractive layout.
Release