What We Have Done

An Oral History of the Disability Rights Movement

Author: Fred Pelka

Publisher: Univ of Massachusetts Press

ISBN: 1558499199

Category: History

Page: 622

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"Nothing about us without us" has been a core principle of American disability rights activists for more than half a century. It represents a response by people with disabilities to being treated with scorn and abuse or as objects of pity, and to having the most fundamental decisions relating to their lives--where they would live; if and how they would be educated; if they would be allowed to marry or have families; indeed, if they would be permitted to live at all--made by those who were, in the parlance of the movement, "temporarily able-bodied." In What We Have Done: An Oral History of the Disability Rights Movement, Fred Pelka takes that slogan at face value. He presents the voices of disability rights activists who, in the period from 1950 to 1990, transformed how society views people with disabilities, and recounts how the various streams of the movement came together to push through the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, the most sweeping civil rights legislation since passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Beginning with the stories of those who grew up with disabilities in the 1940s and '50s, the book traces how disability came to be seen as a political issue, and how people with disabilities--often isolated, institutionalized, and marginalized--forged a movement analogous to the civil rights, women's rights, and gay rights movements, and fought for full and equal participation in American society.
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Enabling Acts

The Hidden Story of How the Americans with Disabilities Act Gave the Largest US Minority Its Rights

Author: Lennard J. Davis

Publisher: Beacon Press

ISBN: 0807071579

Category: Social Science

Page: 296

View: 351

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The first significant book on the history and impact of the ADA—the “eyes on the prize” moment for disability rights The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) is the widest-ranging and most comprehensive piece of civil rights legislation ever passed in the United States, and it has become the model for disability-based laws around the world. Yet the surprising story behind how the bill came to be is little known. In this riveting account, acclaimed disability scholar Lennard J. Davis delivers the first behind-the-scenes and on-the-ground narrative of how a band of leftist Berkeley hippies managed to make an alliance with upper-crust, conservative Republicans to bring about a truly bipartisan bill. Based on extensive interviews with all the major players involved including legislators and activists, Davis recreates the dramatic tension of a story that is anything but a dry account of bills and speeches. Rather, it’s filled with one indefatigable character after another, culminating in explosive moments when the hidden army of the disability community stages scenes like the iconic “Capitol Crawl” or an event some describe as “deaf Selma,” when students stormed Gallaudet University demanding a “Deaf President Now!” From inside the offices of newly formed disability groups to secret breakfast meetings surreptitiously held outside the White House grounds, here we meet countless unsung characters, including political heavyweights and disability advocates on the front lines. “You want to fight?” an angered Ted Kennedy would shout in an upstairs room at the Capitol while negotiating the final details of the ADA. Congressman Tony Coelho, whose parents once thought him to be possessed by the devil because of his epilepsy, later became the bill’s primary sponsor. There’s Justin Dart, adorned in disability power buttons and his signature cowboy hat, who took to the road canvassing fifty states, and people like Patrisha Wright, also known as “The General,” Arlene Myerson or “the brains,” “architect” Bob Funk, and visionary Mary Lou Breslin, who left the hippie highlands of the West to pursue equal rights in the marble halls of DC. Published for the twenty-fifth anniversary of the ADA, Enabling Acts promises to ignite readers in a discussion of disability rights by documenting this “eyes on the prize” moment for tens of millions of American citizens.
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Disability Rights Movement

Author: Tim McNeese

Publisher: ABDO

ISBN: 1617838861

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 112

View: 2542

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In the face of injustice, people band together to work for change, and through their influence, what was once unthinkable becomes common. This title traces the history of the disability rights movement in the United States, including the key players, watershed moments, and legislative battles that have driven social change. Iconic images and informative sidebars accompany compelling text that follows the movement from the work of early activists to bring dignity to the lives of people in institutions through the fight to make society adapt to the needs of people with disabilities and up to new legislative triumphs in the late twentieth and early twenty-first century. Features include a glossary, selected bibliography, Web sites, source notes, and an index, plus a timeline and essential facts. Aligned to Common Core Standards and correlated to state standards. Essential Library is an imprint of ABDO Publishing Company.
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Illness and Image

Case Studies in the Medical Humanities

Author: Sander L. Gilman

Publisher: Transaction Publishers

ISBN: 1412855381

Category: Psychology

Page: 276

View: 5604

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The humanities in higher education are too often labeled as impractical and are not usually valued in today’s marketplace. Yet in professional fields, such as the health sciences, interest in what the humanities can offer has increased. Advocates claim the humanities offer health care professionals greater insight into how to work with those who need their help. Illness and Image introduces undergraduates and professionals to the medical humanities, using a series of case studies, beginning with debates about male circumcision from the ancient world to the present, to the meanings of authenticity in the face transplantation arena. The case studies address the interpretation of mental illness as a disability and the “new” category of mental illness, “self-harm.” Sander L. Gilman shows how medicine projects such categories’ existence into the historical past to show that they are not bound in time and space and, therefore, are “real.” Illness and Image provides students and researchers with models and possible questions regarding categories often assumed to be either trans-historical or objective, making it useful as a textbook.
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Proud Voices

An Oral History of the Disability Rights Movement in Michigan (1960-1980)

Author: Lauren J. Thomas

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Discrimination against people with disabilities

Page: 46

View: 3152

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A Different Blaze

Author: Fred Pelka

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781937146627

Category:

Page: N.A

View: 8762

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Fred Pelka's poems occupy poetry's narrow window, where words say what they mean and surprise at the same time. A Different Blaze takes on love, the fragility of being, war, and time, sidestepping sentimentality--but not heart, mixing darkness with humor. Pelka's voice is both direct and lyrical. "It is forbidden to walk on stilts in the snow-filled rooms of your imagination." Characters come alive; laughing Michael, in his souped-up power wheel chair; a German WW II soldier, awarded the Order of the Frozen Meat; a grandmother on her 100th birthday; a speech therapy student; a bank robber. These poems aren't afraid to address love, which might need "a wheelchair to waltz," or "a service dog to fetch the credit card receipt," but which serves to send us into "another ecstatically exuberant form of life."
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