The Way We Ate

The Way We Ate

Homemade dumplings were about the most exotic of the foods we ate, exotic for me anyway.” top when the water boils. Let them bubble gently for a few min- utes, no more than 5. While they're cooking, melt the butter in a pan.

Author: Noah Fecks

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 9781476732725

Category: Cooking

Page: 347

View: 203

Capturing the arc of the twentieth century through foods that reflect moments in time, features one recipe per year from 1901 to 2000, from modern twists on memorable classics to original recipes based on historical events.
Categories: Cooking

We Ate Wonder Bread

We Ate Wonder Bread

We did not have a healthy diet. We put no stock in healthy food. My mother often said: “You have to eat a pound of dirt before you die,” which explained why I could eat something I had dropped in the street after blowing on it.

Author: Nicole Hollander

Publisher: Fantagraphics Books

ISBN: 9781683960102

Category: Comics & Graphic Novels

Page: 160

View: 293

Nicole Hollander’s internationally syndicated comic strip, Sylvia, ran for thirty years. We Ate Wonder Bread is veteran cartoonist Hollander’s first graphic novel, a coming-of-age story starring the gangsters, the glamourous, the bed bugs, the (enviable) Catholic girls, the police, the jukebox, the fortune teller, and the blue Hudson—the family car, always at the ready for frequent drives into better neighborhoods. Much of the milieu and many of the characters who inhabited Hollander’s progressive comic strip, Sylvia, originated in her childhood neighborhood; not only does this illustrated memoir give insight into how Hollander developed her style and wit, it’s a chronicle of a Chicago community that has since disappeared into an expressway.
Categories: Comics & Graphic Novels

In Late Winter We Ate Pears

In Late Winter We Ate Pears

These elements of hunger are the reasons why Caleb and I opened a bakery and restaurant in Vermont that we named Pane e Salute, which means “bread and ... In the Middle Ages, osteria was defined as an inn, a tavern where you could eat a ...

Author: Deirdre Heekin

Publisher: Chelsea Green Publishing

ISBN: 9781603582261

Category: Cooking

Page: 312

View: 342

More than a cookbook, In Late Winter We Ate Pears is a love affair with a culture and a way of life. In vignettes taken from their year in Italy, husband and wife Caleb Barber and Deirdre Heekin offer glimpses of a young, vibrant Italy: of rolling out pizza dough in an ancient hilltown at midnight while wild dogs bay in the abandoned streets; of the fogged car windows of an ancient lovers' lane amid the olive groves outside Prato. The recipes in In Late Winter We Ate Pears are every bit as delicious as the memories. Selections such as red snapper with fennel sauce, fresh figs with balsamic vinegar and mint, and frangipane and plum tart capture the essence of Italy. Following the tradition of Italian cuisine, the 80 recipes are laid out according to season, to suggest taking advantage of your freshest local ingredients. Whether you are an experienced cook looking for authentic Italian recipes or a beginner wanting to immerse yourself in the romance of a young couple's culinary adventure, In Late Winter We Ate Pears provides rich sustenance in the best tradition of travel and food writing. Cheers to Chef Barber and writer Deirdre Heekin for sharing these marvelous recipes from Osteria Pane e Salute (Pane translates as bread and Salute as health) and for sharing the story of a most inspired year spent in Italy. In Late Winter We Ate Pears is a testament that bread and health are the things that make a good life.
Categories: Cooking

We Ate All the Pies

We Ate All the Pies

holidays in the 1960s meant going on a train to places such as Filey, or, if we were really lucky, Withernsea, ... better forbeing eaten outdoors, and whenfootball grounds startedselling food,we hadn't forgotten this important insight.

Author: John Nicholson

Publisher: Biteback Publishing

ISBN: 9781849542722

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 256

View: 432

In Who Ate All the Pies?, the gonzo sports journalist explores and celebrates the things we love about the whole culture of the game, tries to explain how we got to where we are now and speculates where we the game is headed. Amongst other things, he explores the history of the football shirt in style and design; how and why sponsorship became the norm; the culture of food inside the ground, around the stadium and in the pubs and clubs, and how the culture of pies and the modern trend of fine dining changed the match day experience (and why prawn sandwiches are the perfect expression of the class-politics of football); why booze is so important to football; how football is used by people to vent their everyday frustrations and emotions and how this is managed by the clubs. He also describes the history of football on TV and how it changed perceptions of teams and countries (in particular, the 1970 World Cup TV revolution); the role of international football in national identity and the intricate complexities of being a Teessider, Northern and English, in that order!
Categories: Sports & Recreation

Yes We Ate Turtle

Yes We Ate Turtle

Personal Notes: I think you know a few of the stories behind these! Remember me trying to do about 25 lbs of beans at a time? If you like baked beans from a can, then you will LOVE these ones made from scratch.

Author: Stacey Magnuson

Publisher: Lulu.com

ISBN: 9781300425700

Category:

Page:

View: 203

Categories:

The Prime Cause of Cancer

The Prime Cause of Cancer

In Book 1: Food and Cancer: A Guide to Understanding the Secondary Causes of Cancer, we learned that roughly 90% of cancers ... in which we work and live, —the electromagnetic radiation we are exposed to, and chiefly —the foods we eat.

Author: Otto Warburg

Publisher: EnCognitive.com

ISBN: 9781927091173

Category: Health & Fitness

Page: 558

View: 672

This is book 2 of 5 of the “Understand Cancer” series. It is based on the best-available science. The SECONDARY causes of cancer were discussed in book one. This book continues from book one and discusses the PRIME cause of cancer as discovered by Nobel Prize Laureate Dr. Otto Warburg—considered by many as the founder of modern biochemistry. “There are prime and secondary causes of diseases. For example, the prime cause of the plague is the plague bacillus, but secondary causes of the plague are filth, rats, and the fleas that transfer the plague bacillus from rats to man. By a prime cause of a disease I mean one that is found in every case of the disease...Cancer, above all other diseases, has countless secondary causes. But, even for cancer, there is only one prime cause. Summarized in a few words, the prime cause of cancer is the replacement of the respiration of oxygen in normal body cells by a fermentation of sugar. All normal body cells meet their energy needs by respiration of oxygen, whereas cancer cells meet their energy needs in great part by fermentation. All normal body cells are thus obligate aerobes, whereas all cancer cells are partial anaerobes. From the standpoint of the physics and chemistry of life this difference between normal and cancer cells is so great that one can scarcely picture a greater difference. Oxygen gas, the donor of energy in plants and animals is dethroned in the cancer cells and replaced by an energy yielding reaction of the lowest living forms, namely, a fermentation of glucose.” —Dr. Otto Warburg
Categories: Health & Fitness

Realizing Genjokoan

Realizing Genjokoan

We ate tofu almost every day and it became our main source of protein. One day when I was shopping at a natural food store with a practitioner from our zendo, we saw a poster that read, “We are what we eat.” In response I said, ...

Author: Shohaku Okumura

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 9780861716012

Category: Philosophy

Page: 326

View: 922

"Dogen's masterpiece is beautifully translated and clarified in an equally masterful way. An obvious labor of love based on many years of careful study, reflection, and practice that succeeds in bringing this profound text to life for us all." Larry Rosenberg, author of Breath by Breath "An unequaled introduction to the writings of the great Zen master Eihei Dogen that opens doors to Dogen's vast understanding for everyone from newcomer to adept." Jisho Warner, co-editor of Opening the Hand of Thought "Realizing Genjokoan is a stunning commentary on the famous first chapter of Dogen's Shobogenzo. Like all masterful commentaries, this one finds in the few short lines of the text the entire span of the Buddhist teachings. Okumura has been contemplating, studying, and teaching the Genjokoan for many decades, which is evident in both the remarkable insight he brings to the text and the clarity with which he presents it." Buddhadharma: The Buddhist Review "This book is a treasure. Though many quite useful translations of Genjokoan are already available, as well as helpful commentaries, this book goes beyond. I have been considering Genjokoan for thirty-five years, and still I enjoyed many helpful revelations inthis book. For all people interested in Zen, this book will be a valuable and illuminating resource. Please enjoy it." from the foreword by Taigen Dan Leighton, editor and co-translator of Dogen's Extensive Record "A clear and concise commentary on one of Dogen's most difficult pieces." Brad Warner, author of Hardcore Zen
Categories: Philosophy

Musings on Doctrine

Musings on Doctrine

We are what we eat, or rather, we start out from what our parents ate. Then we are what we eat. Every single molecule in our bodies has come from the earth. As unromantic as it sounds, our conception was the union of the steak and ...

Author: John C' de Baca

Publisher: WestBow Press

ISBN: 9781490829876

Category: Religion

Page: 222

View: 629

Have you ever wondered about the security of salvation—your own or perhaps that of someone you know? Do you sometimes worry about not going to hell? And what about babies? Do they get a free pass to Heaven? And where did evil come from, anyway? Why? Is Eve really to blame for all the world’s troubles? Do the Ten Commandments apply to everyone? In marriage, do wives really have to be in subjection to their husbands? And are you concerned about how this world is headed? What does the Bible really say about events like the rapture, the great tribulation, the mark of the beast, the abomination of desolation, and those other scary things? There’s no need to wonder any longer. Here are the answers and more from God’s Word, easy to understand but profound and right on target. But be aware that some of your long-held beliefs will be thrown rudely to the ground. The author tells it like it is, not like what you thought it was. If you are sincere about finding the truth, it will help you find it. If you can’t handle the truth, it may anger and frustrate you. Either way, you won’t ever be the same.
Categories: Religion

What to Eat

What to Eat

In other words, we've moved on. Whereas we have mealtimes, the chimps in Gombe must eat for around half their waking life to get enough calories. If they are lucky, they might snaffle a monkey head. One of the reasons they don't hunt as ...

Author: Hattie Ellis

Publisher: Portobello Books

ISBN: 9781846274374

Category: Cooking

Page: 448

View: 529

Deciding what to eat is no longer a simple matter of instinct and appetite. Every choice we make about the food we put on our plates is complicated. Is meat good or bad for me? Is buying local always best? Is organic worth it? WHAT TO EAT? asks all these questions and more: some are specific, going back to the nature of particular foods such as milk, meat and fish. Some are more general and challenging, examining the green and the good at a time when money is short and choices matter. The book also offers answers. This is a refreshingly practical guide to the stuff of everyday living, from the ingredients up: Hattie Ellis exposes the myths and unveils the truth about how food is produced, what gives us most value for money, what it does to us, and what we have done to it.
Categories: Cooking

Culinary Linguistics

Culinary Linguistics

Often, we eat or witness others eating without assigning any social significance to this act (Warde 1997). ... (Gabaccia 1998:9), and reformulated, “We are what we ate” (Belasco 2008:32) or “We are where we eat” (Bell & Valentine ...

Author: Cornelia Gerhardt

Publisher: John Benjamins Publishing

ISBN: 9789027271716

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 347

View: 370

Language and food are universal to humankind. Language accomplishes more than a pure exchange of information, and food caters for more than mere subsistence. Both represent crucial sites for socialization, identity construction, and the everyday fabrication and perception of the world as a meaningful, orderly place. This volume on Culinary Linguistics contains an introduction to the study of food and an extensive overview of the literature focusing on its role in interplay with language. It is the only publication fathoming the field of food and food-related studies from a linguistic perspective. The research articles assembled here encompass a number of linguistic fields, ranging from historical and ethnographic approaches to literary studies, the teaching of English as a foreign language, psycholinguistics, and the study of computer-mediated communication, making this volume compulsory reading for anyone interested in genres of food discourse and the linguistic connection between food and culture. Now Open Access as part of the Knowledge Unlatched 2017 Backlist Collection.
Categories: Language Arts & Disciplines