Voyages of Discovery

The Archaeology of Islands

Author: Society for American Archaeology. Meeting

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN: 9780275979478

Category: Social Science

Page: 309

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Synthesizes the major issues in island archaeological research including human impacts on island ecosystems, island colonization, exchange systems, and theoretical and methodological concerns.
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The Archaeology of Islands

Author: Paul Rainbird

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1139463942

Category: Social Science

Page: N.A

View: 8462

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Archaeologists have traditionally considered islands as distinct physical and social entities. In this book, Paul Rainbird discusses the historical construction of this characterization and questions the basis for such an understanding of island archaeology. Through a series of case studies of prehistoric archaeology in the Mediterranean, Pacific, Baltic, and Atlantic seas and oceans, he argues for a decentering of the land in favor of an emphasis on the archaeology of the sea and, ultimately, a new perspective on the making of maritime communities. The archaeology of islands is thus unshackled from approaches that highlight boundedness and isolation, and replaced with a new set of principles - that boundaries are fuzzy, islanders are distinctive in their expectation of contacts with people from over the seas, and that island life can tell us much about maritime communities. Debating islands, thus, brings to the fore issues of identity and community and a concern with Western construction of other peoples.
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Island Societies

Archaeological Approaches to Evolution and Transformation

Author: Patrick Vinton Kirch

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521301893

Category: Social Science

Page: 98

View: 8684

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Concentrating their attention on the Pacific Islands, the contributors to this book show how the tightly focused social and economic systems of islands offer archaeologists a series of unique opportunities for tracking and explaining prehistoric change. From the 1950s onwards, excavations in such islands as Fiji, Palau and Hawaii revolutionised Oceanic archaeology and, as the major problems of cultural origins and island sequences were resolves, archaeologists came increasingly to study social change and to integrate newly acquired data on material culture with older ethnographic and ethnohistorical materials. The fascinating results of this work, centring on the evolution of complex Oceanic chiefdoms into something very much like classic 'archaic states', are authoritatively surveyed here.
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Islands in Time

Island Sociogeography and Mediterranean Prehistory

Author: Mark Patton

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 0203433335

Category: Social Science

Page: 224

View: 2694

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Islands in Time explores the ecological and cultural development of prehistoric island societies. It considers the prehistory of the Mediterranean and offers an explanation of the effects of isolation on the development of human communities. Evidence is drawn from a broad range of Mediterranean islands including Cyprus, Crete and the Cyclades, Malta, Lipari, Corsica and Sardinia.
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Interconnections in the Central Mediterranean

The Maltese Islands and Sicily in History : Proceedings of the Conference, St Julians, Malta, 2nd and 3rd November 2007

Author: Anthony Bonanno,Pietro Militello

Publisher: Officina di Studi Medievali

ISBN: 8888615806

Category: Malta

Page: 122

View: 5935

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Vaka Moana

Voyages of the Ancestors : the Discovery and Settlement of the Pacific

Author: K. R. Howe

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Navigation

Page: 360

View: 1577

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VAKA MOANA is a story of origins and identity; a voyage across thousands of miles and hundreds of generations, and a testament to the ingenuity and bravery of humankind. Published to accompany a major international travelling exhibition of the same name opening at Auckland Museum on 6 December in the new exhibition gallery, VAKA MOANA brings together the latest scholarship on the peopling of the Pacific, traditional voyaging and navigation, and the modern renaissance of voyaging that has brought a resurgence in interest in Pacific cultures. Leading New Zealand and international scholars, writers and practitioners discuss the oral traditions of the great voyagers; the exploration and settlement of the Pacific (the last place on earth to be settled by people); the craft that made the journeys possible and the navigation methods that took people safely across empty oceans; the fateful meeting of two cultures - Pacific and European in the 17th, 18th and 19th centuries; and the revival in traditional techniques of boat-building and long-distance voyaging and the reawakening of Pacific pride.
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Integrating archaeology and ethnohistory

the development of exchange between Yap and Ulithi, western Caroline Islands

Author: Christophe Descantes

Publisher: British Archaeological Reports

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 124

View: 1291

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This book attempts to explain the development of exchange relations between the two culturally distinct societies of Yap and Ulithi, Western Caroline Islands (Pacific Ocean). Much has been written about past interactions between Yap and Ulithi, both members of a larger exchange system known as "sawel." This study contributes to the long-term effort of research on interactions between Yap and the coral atolls of the Western Caroline Islands by adding ceramic analyses from archaeological contexts and diachronic explication of the ethnohistoric data pertaining to exchange. The author includes chemical characterization data from Yapese and Ulithian contexts to address questions about ceramic exchange and culture change. Before integrating the fragmentary archaeological and ethnohistoric records of exchange, ethnohistoric records are independently analyzed and structured into a diachronic paradigm. Archaeological and ethnohistorical records are integrated to construct a model of past Yap-Ulithi exchange. This model encompasses the time period between the earliest archaeological evidence of interaction on Mogmog (cal A.D. 620, AA-21212) to the end of the nineteenth century, when inter-island voyages were forbidden by the German and later the Japanese colonial governments. The distinct epistemologies of archaeological and ethnohistoric records of exchange are also examined to understand the possible integration of these vital data.
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Cartographic Encounters

Perspectives on Native American Mapmaking and Map Use

Author: G. Malcolm Lewis

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226476940

Category: History

Page: 318

View: 3993

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Ever since a Native American prepared a paper "charte" of the lower Colorado River for the Spaniard Hernando de Alarcón in 1540, Native Americans have been making maps in the course of encounters with whites. This book charts the history of these cartographic encounters, examining native maps and mapmaking from the pre- and post-contact periods. G. Malcolm Lewis provides accessible and detailed overviews of the history of native North American maps, mapmaking, and scholarly interest in these topics. Other contributions include a study of colonial Aztec cartography that highlights the connections among maps, space, and history; an account of the importance of native maps as archaeological evidence; and an interpretation of an early-contact-period hide painting of an actual encounter involving whites and two groups of warring natives. Although few original native maps have survived, contemporary copies and accounts of mapmaking form a rich resource for anyone interested in the history of Native American encounters or the history of cartography and geography.
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The Mapping of New Spain

Indigenous Cartography and the Maps of the Relaciones Geograficas

Author: Barbara E. Mundy

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226550978

Category: History

Page: 281

View: 4394

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To learn about its territories in the New World, Spain commissioned a survey of Spanish officials in Mexico between 1578 and 1584, asking for local maps as well as descriptions of local resources, history, and geography. In The Mapping of New Spain, Barbara Mundy illuminates both the Amerindian (Aztec, Mixtec, and Zapotec) and the Spanish traditions represented in these maps and traces the reshaping of indigene world views in the wake of colonization. "Its contribution to its specific field is both significant and original. . . . It is a pure pleasure to read." —Sabine MacCormack, Isis "Mundy has done a fine job of balancing the artistic interpretation of the maps with the larger historical context within which they were drawn. . . . This is an important work." —John F. Schwaller, Sixteenth Century Journal "This beautiful book opens a Pandora's box in the most positive sense, for it provokes the reconsideration of several long-held opinions about Spanish colonialism and its effects on Native American culture." —Susan Schroeder, American Historical Review
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