Uncle Sam's Policemen

The Pursuit of Fugitives across Borders

Author: Katherine Unterman

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674915895

Category: Law

Page: N.A

View: 2447

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Extraordinary rendition—abducting criminal suspects around the world—has been criticized as an unprecedented expansion of U.S. policing. But America’s pursuit of fugitives beyond its borders predates the Global War on Terror. Katherine Unterman shows that the extension of manhunts into foreign lands formed an important chapter in American empire.
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On the Lam

A History of Hunting Fugitives in America

Author: Jerry Clark,Ed Palattella

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 1442262591

Category: History

Page: 248

View: 9355

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On the Lam is a detailed history of fugitives in the United States. The authors explore how law enforcement officials and others, including bounty hunters and bail-bond workers, have tracked fugitives over the past two centuries. They also examine how fugitives have influenced American history and the American criminal justice system.
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Badges without Borders

How Global Counterinsurgency Transformed American Policing

Author: Stuart Schrader

Publisher: University of California Press

ISBN: 0520295625

Category: History

Page: 386

View: 516

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From the Cold War through today, the U.S. has quietly assisted dozens of regimes around the world in suppressing civil unrest and securing the conditions for the smooth operation of capitalism. Casting a new light on American empire, Badges Without Borders shows, for the first time, that the very same people charged with global counterinsurgency also militarized American policing at home. In this groundbreaking exposé, Stuart Schrader shows how the United States projected imperial power overseas through police training and technical assistance—and how this effort reverberated to shape the policing of city streets at home. Examining diverse records, from recently declassified national security and intelligence materials to police textbooks and professional magazines, Schrader reveals how U.S. police leaders envisioned the beat to be as wide as the globe and worked to put everyday policing at the core of the Cold War project of counterinsurgency. A “smoking gun” book, Badges without Borders offers a new account of the War on Crime, “law and order” politics, and global counterinsurgency, revealing the connections between foreign and domestic racial control.
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The Political Economy of Robots

Prospects for Prosperity and Peace in the Automated 21st Century

Author: Ryan Kiggins

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 3319514660

Category: Political Science

Page: 336

View: 1581

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This collection examines implications of technological automation to global prosperity and peace. Focusing on robots, information communication technologies, and other automation technologies, it offers brief interventions that assess how automation may alter extant political, social, and economic institutions, norms, and practices that comprise the global political economy. In doing so, this collection deals directly with such issues as automated production, trade, war, state sanctioned robot violence, financial speculation, transnational crime, and policy decision making. This interdisciplinary volume will appeal to students, scholars and practitioners grappling with political, economic, and social problems that arise from rapid technological change that automates the prospects for human prosperity and peace.
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Fanáticos, Exiles, and Spies

Revolutionary Failures on the US-Mexico Border, 1923–1930

Author: Julian F. Dodson

Publisher: Texas A&M University Press

ISBN: 1623497574

Category: History

Page: 240

View: 5051

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Borders and boundaries are porous, especially in the context of political revolutions. Historian Julian F. Dodson has uncovered the story of postrevolutionary Mexico’s attempts to protect its northern border from various plots hatched by groups exiled in the United States. Such plots sought to overthrow the regime of President Plutarco Elías Calles in the 1920s. These borderland battles were largely fought through espionage, pitting undercover agents of the government’s Departamento Confidencial against various groups of political exiles—themselves experienced spies—who were now residing in American cities such as Los Angeles, Tucson, San Antonio, and Brownsville. Fanáticos, Exiles, and Spies shows that, in successive waves, the political and military exiles of the Mexican Revolution (1910–1920) sought refuge in and continued to operate from urban centers along the international boundary. The de la Huerta rebellion of 1923 and the Cristero War of 1926–1929 defined the bloody religious conflict that dominated the decade, even as smaller rebellions bubbled up along the border, often funded by politically connected exiles. Previous scholarship has tended to treat these various rebellions as isolated episodes, but Dodson argues that the violent popular and military uprisings were not isolated at all. They were nothing less than an extension of the violence and fratricidal warfare that so distinctly marked the preceding decade of the revolution. Fanáticos, Exiles, and Spies reveals the fluidity of a border between two nations before it hardened into the political boundary we know today.
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