Translational Criminology and Counterterrorism

Global Threats and Local Responses

Author: Leslie W. Kennedy,Yasemin Irvin-Erickson,Alexis R. Kennedy

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1461455561

Category: Social Science

Page: 63

View: 9581

DOWNLOAD NOW »

This brief focuses on translational criminology practices as they relate to counter-terrorism and homeland security. The work provides a detailed and practical examination of how global threats (such as, terrorism and cybercrime) are managed through local response. It covers emerging strategies in data collection procedures, inter-agency cooperation, and new analytical techniques including risk-terrain modeling. In addition, it presents a common methodology, including steps in risk assessment, risk management, and decision-making, that can be used to frame and analyze global and local threats. The authors examine these issues using examples of how law enforcement responded to specific security threats including the 2013 Boston Marathon bombings, the 2003 terrorist attack in Istanbul, Turkey, and the 2010 Stuxnet attack on the Natanz nuclear facility in Iran. This work expands on existing literature covering the impact that globalization has on cross national threats, drawing on disciplines related to criminology, such as international relations and political science.
Release

Transnational Crime and Global Security [2 volumes]

Author: Philip L. Reichel,Ryan Randa

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 144084318X

Category: Political Science

Page: 701

View: 7957

DOWNLOAD NOW »

This two-volume work offers a comprehensive examination of the distressing topics of transnational crime and the implications for global security. • Represents global collaboration among contributors including scholars from respected universities in Europe, North America, and Australia; professionals at public policy research institutes; and researchers at several United Nations entities • Provides perspectives from contributors of geographic diversity and varied backgrounds that combine to form a global panorama of crime and security topics • Provides readers a single work to learn about both specific transnational crimes (Volume 1) and efforts to prevent and combat those crimes (Volume 2) • Prefaces each chapter with an introduction that contextualizes content for closer reading
Release

Risk-Based Policing

Evidence-Based Crime Prevention with Big Data and Spatial Analytics

Author: Leslie W. Kennedy,Joel M. Caplan,Eric L. Piza

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 0520295633

Category: Social Science

Page: 168

View: 8033

DOWNLOAD NOW »

"Risk-based policing is the latest advancement in the long history of policing innovations, where research and planning have combined to manage crime risks, prevent crime, and enhance public safety. In Risk-Based Policing the authors share case studies from different agencies to demonstrate how focusing police resources at risky places, based on smart uses of data and strong analytical work, can address the worst effects of disorder and crime while improving public safety and community relations. Topics include the role of big data; the evolution of modern policing; dealing with high-risk targets; designing, implementing, and evaluating risk-based policing strategies; and the role of multiple stakeholders in risk-based policing. Case studies explore cities such as Colorado Springs, Glendale, Newark, Kansas City, and others. The book also demonstrates how Risk Terrain Modeling (RTM) can be extended to offer a more comprehensive view of prevention and deterrence"--Provided by publisher.
Release

Evidence-Based Counterterrorism Policy

Author: Cynthia Lum,Leslie W. Kennedy

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9781461409533

Category: Social Science

Page: 388

View: 6858

DOWNLOAD NOW »

In the past eight years, there has been a massive increase in government spending on counterterrorism intervention development and implementation. Given this increase, there are two evidence-based policy questions that are important to address: Is there evidence that any of these programs are effective – in other words, can they be shown to be linked to reducing terrorism, terrorist recruiting, or to improving the response and management of terrorist events? Do these interventions have secondary or collateral effects that may be costly, harmful, illegal, beneficial, or otherwise? As Lum and Kennedy discovered in an evaluation research on counterterrorism interventions, only a minuscule number of empirical studies of terrorism exist and there is an almost complete absence of evaluation research on counter-terrorism strategies. This is startling given the enormous increases in the development and use of counter-terrorism programs, as well as spending on counter-terrorism activity. Even more disconcerting was the nature of the evaluations we did find; some programs were shown to either have no discernible effect on terrorism or lead to increases in terrorism. The emphasis of the need for empirical research in evaluating interventions and informing policy cannot be overstated, and is the primary goal of Evidence-Based Counterterrorism Policy.
Release

Developing and Maintaining Police-Researcher Partnerships to Facilitate Research Use

A Comparative Analysis

Author: Jeff Rojek,Peter Martin,Geoffrey P. Alpert

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1493920561

Category: Social Science

Page: 84

View: 3545

DOWNLOAD NOW »

This Brief discusses methods to develop and maintain police – researcher partnerships. First, the authors provide information that will be useful to police managers and researchers who are interested in creating and maintaining partnerships to conduct research, work together to improve policing and help others understand the linkages between the two groups. Then, more specifically, they describe how police managers consider and utilize research in policing and criminal justice and its findings from a management perspective in both the United States and Australia. While both countries experience similar issues of trust, acceptance, utility, and accountability between researchers and practitioners, the experiences in the countries differ. In the United States with 17,000 agencies, the use of research findings by police agencies requires understanding, diffusion and acceptance. In Australia with a small number of larger agencies, the problems of research-practitioner partnerships have different translational issues, including acceptance and application. As long as police practitioners and academic researchers hold distinct and different impressions of each other, the likelihood of positive, cooperative, and sustainable agreements between them will suffer.
Release