Tokaido Texts and Tales

Tokaido Texts and Tales

The contributors to this volume study the huge woodcut generated by the artists Kuniyoshi, Hiroshige an Kunisada titled "Fifty-Three Stations of the Tokaido Road."

Author: Andreas Marks

Publisher: Cofrin Asian Art

ISBN: 0813060214

Category: Art

Page: 206

View: 765

The contributors to this volume study the huge woodcut generated by the artists Kuniyoshi, Hiroshige an Kunisada titled "Fifty-Three Stations of the Tokaido Road."
Categories: Art

Tales of a Rain d Moon

Tales of a Rain d Moon

[b] In the original text 'Jfcjgit' (Tokaido), of which 'to' means 'east', 'kai', 'sea', and 'do', 'road', one of the artery highways of Japan, starting from Kyoto, then down along the Pacific coast to Yedo. [c] In the original text ...

Author: 上田秋成

Publisher:

ISBN: UOM:39015008985866

Category: Japanese fiction

Page: 182

View: 909

Categories: Japanese fiction

The T kaid Road

The T  kaid   Road

If he did , the connection between episodes would become plot rather than sequence , and the work would look more like a tale than a collection of tales . ( Ueda 1985 : 79 ) According to Ueda , a piece of writing that exclusively relies ...

Author: Jilly (Parsons The New School for Design Traganou, USA)

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN: 0415310911

Category: History

Page: 270

View: 608

Offers a comparative study of representations of the Tôkaidô road, the most important route of Japan during the Edo (1600-1868) and Meiji (1868-1912) eras.
Categories: History

Ugetsu Monogatari Or Tales of Moonlight and Rain

Ugetsu Monogatari Or Tales of Moonlight and Rain

A Complete English Version of the Eighteenth-century Japanese Collection of Tales of the Supernatural Ueda Akinari ... 537 'East of the barrier' Kan no higashi: east of the checkpoint between Hakone and Odawara on the Tōkaidō Post Road.

Author: Ueda Akinari

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9780415618779

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 280

View: 906

Ugetsu Monogatari, or Tales of Moonlight and Rain numbers among the best-loved Japanese classics. These nine illustrated tales of the supernatural from eighteenth-century Osaka combine popular appeal with a high literary standard. The author expressed his complex views on human life and society in simple yet poetic language. Akinari questioned the prevailing moral values and standards of his age whilst entertaining his readers with mystery and other-worldly occurrences. This is a reissue of Leon Zolbrodâe(tm)s definitive English translation of the work, first published in 1974.
Categories: Language Arts & Disciplines

Ugetsu Monogatari or Tales of Moonlight and Rain Routledge Revivals

Ugetsu Monogatari or Tales of Moonlight and Rain  Routledge Revivals

A Complete English Version of the Eighteenth-Century Japanese collection of Tales of the Supernatural Ueda Akinari ... 537 'East of the barrier' Kan no higashi: east of the checkpoint between Hakone and Odawara on the Tōkaidō Post Road.

Author: Ueda Akinari

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781136810329

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 280

View: 717

Ugetsu Monogatari, or Tales of Moonlight and Rain numbers among the best-loved Japanese classics. These nine illustrated tales of the supernatural from eighteenth-century Osaka combine popular appeal with a high literary standard. The author expressed his complex views on human life and society in simple yet poetic language. Akinari questioned the prevailing moral values and standards of his age whilst entertaining his readers with mystery and other-worldly occurrences. This is a reissue of Leon Zolbrod’s definitive English translation of the work, first published in 1974.
Categories: Language Arts & Disciplines

The Last Tosa

The Last Tosa

For Asai Ryõi's text , see Nihon koten kankūkai , Tõkaidő meishoki , in Nihon koten zenshū ( Tokyo ... here to the Broomwood chapter of the Tale of Genji rather than the sixth chapter of the Tales of Ise or Sõcho's Tale of a Rainy Night ...

Author: Sandy Kita

Publisher: University of Hawaii Press

ISBN: 0824818261

Category: Art

Page: 412

View: 740

Iwasa Katsumochi Matabei (1578-1650) is one of the most controversial figures in Japanese art history. For more than half a century, historians have argued over Matabei's role in Japanese art: Was he, as he asserted, "The Last Tosa" (the school of painters who specialized in Yamato-e, a kind of classical courtly painting) or, as others characterized him, "The Founder of Ukiyo-e," the style of painting associated with the urban commoner class. In this highly original and convincing study, Matabei emerges as both - an artist in whose work can be seen elements of both Yamato-e and Ukiyo-e. Extending its analysis beyond the individual artist, The Last Tosa examines the trends and artistic developments of a transitional period and makes heretofore unexamined connections between the world of the aristocrat and the merchant as well as the two artistic schools that reflected their tastes.
Categories: Art

The Tokaido Road

The Tokaido Road

If errors remain in the text, the author takes sole responsibility for them. Friends in Japan have also encouraged, aided, and sheltered me while I researched the tale of the fortyseven r nin. In 1970 the Nakatsu family of Iwakuni ...

Author: Lucia St. Clair Robson

Publisher: Forge Books

ISBN: 9781429935999

Category: Fiction

Page: 528

View: 448

After the execution of her father, the young and beautiful Lady Asano is in grave danger from the powerful Lord Kira. In order to save herself Asano must find Oishi, the leader of the fighting men of her clan. She believes he is three hundred miles to the southwest in the imperial city of Kyoto. Disguising her loveliness in the humble garments of a traveling priest, and calling herself Cat, Lady Asano travels the fabled Tokaido Road. Her only tools are her quick wits, her samurai training, and her deadly, six foot-long naginata. And she will need them all, for a ronin has been hired to pursue her, a mysterious man who will play a role in Cat's drama that neither could have ever imagined. . . . At the Publisher's request, this title is being sold without Digital Rights Management Software (DRM) applied.
Categories: Fiction

The Tale of Genji

The Tale of Genji

80, 83 Fifty-Three Stations of the Tókaidó Road (Tókaidó gojūsantsugi no uchi, Kunisada, illus.) ... 233–234, 261 Fraser, Mrs. Hugh, 253–254 French language, 6, 245, 247, 308, 325, 381 Freud, Sigmund, 238 “From Work to Text” (Barthes), ...

Author: Michael Emmerich

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 9780231534420

Category: History

Page: 512

View: 455

Michael Emmerich thoroughly revises the conventional narrative of the early modern and modern history of The Tale of Genji. Exploring iterations of the work from the 1830s to the 1950s, he demonstrates how translations and the global circulation of discourse they inspired turned The Tale of Genji into a widely read classic, reframing our understanding of its significance and influence and of the processes that have canonized the text. Emmerich begins with an analysis of the lavishly produced best seller Nise Murasaki inaka Genji (A Fraudulent Murasaki's Bumpkin Genji, 1829–1842), an adaptation of Genji written and designed by Ryutei Tanehiko, with pictures by the great print artist Utagawa Kunisada. He argues that this work introduced Genji to a popular Japanese audience and created a new mode of reading. He then considers movable-type editions of Inaka Genji from 1888 to 1928, connecting trends in print technology and publishing to larger developments in national literature and showing how the one-time best seller became obsolete. The study subsequently traces Genji's reemergence as a classic on a global scale, following its acceptance into the canon of world literature before the text gained popularity in Japan. It concludes with Genji's becoming a "national classic" during World War II and reviews an important postwar challenge to reading the work after it attained this status. Through his sustained critique, Emmerich upends scholarship on Japan's preeminent classic while remaking theories of world literature, continuity, and community.
Categories: History

The Tales of Ise

The Tales of Ise

... under the influence of Episode 9, and inserted into the text with no regard to the sequence of events. ... The 'smoke' from Mount Asama could not be seen from the Tokaido (Eastern Sea Road), along which the hero is supposed to have ...

Author:

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN: 9780141392585

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 416

View: 442

One of the three seminal works of Japanese literature, this beautiful collection of poems and tales offers an unparalleled insight into ancient Japan. Along with the Tale of Genji and One Hundred Poets, One Poem Each, The Tales of Ise is considered one of the three most important works of Japanese literature. A poem-tale collection from the early Heian period, it contains many stories of amorous adventures, faithful friendship and travels in exile, framing the exquisite poems at the work's heart. The Tales of Ise has influenced waka, Noh, tales and diaries since the time it was written, and is still the source of endless inspiration in novels, poetry, manga and cartoons. This volume has been translated by Peter MacMillan and includes a preface by the renowned Japanologist Donald Keene. 'MacMillan's Tales of Ise adds to the treasures of Japanese literature that can now be enjoyed in English translation. It is the most poetic translation of this work to date and establishes MacMillan as an outstanding translator of Japanese poetry' - Donald Keene
Categories: Literary Collections

Written Texts visual Texts

Written Texts  visual Texts

Takizawa Bakin 25 , 34 , 41 , 42 , 44-6 , 160 , 179-80 , 192 , 196 , 201-4 Tales of Old Japan 196 Tanaka Yoko 20 ... 125 , 128 , 316 , 331 Tokaido fükei zue ( Illustrated Collection of Landscapes along the Eastern Sea Road ) 122 Tökaidõ ...

Author: Susanne Formanek

Publisher: Hotei Publishing

ISBN: UVA:X004863419

Category: Art

Page: 368

View: 349

Books and book illustrations in early modern Japan / Ekkehard May -- The illustrated household encyclopedias that once civilized Japan / Yokoyama Toshio -- The 'spectacle' of womanhood: new types in texts and pictures on pictorial Sugoroku games of the late Edo period / Susanne Formanek -- The Tokaido woodblock print series as an example of intertextuality in the fine arts / Franziska Ehmcke -- Culinary culture and its transmission in the late Edo period / Harada Nobua -- The hidden heritage : books, prints, printed toys and other publications for young people in Tokugawa Japan / Ann Herring -- The printing of illustrated travelogues in 18th-century Japan / Shirahata Yozaburo -- Illustrated Kabuki texts / Martina Schoenbein -- Kawaraban : enjoying the news when news was forbidden / Sepp Linhart -- Illness illustrated. Socio-historical dimensions of late Edo measles pictures (Hashika-e) / Hartmut O. Rotermund -- Between fiction and non-fiction : documentary literature in the late Edo period / Stephan Kohn -- Publishing Ejanaika : popular religion as media event / Reinhard Zollner -- Shinbun nishiki-e, Nishiki-e shinbut: news and new sensations in old garb at the beginning of a new era / Sepp Linhart.
Categories: Art

Parody Irony and Ideology in the Fiction of Ihara Saikaku

Parody  Irony and Ideology in the Fiction of Ihara Saikaku

... as in the pastiche of Tales of Ise, The Tale of the Heike and other Heian-period and medieval texts in Usuyuki ... such as Asai Ryōi's Tōkaidō meishoki (Famous Sights of the Tōkaidō, 1659),15 may have served as a model for the many ...

Author: David J. Gundry

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9789004344310

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 314

View: 996

The first monograph published in English on Ihara Saikaku’s fiction, Gundry’s lucid, compelling study examines works by Edo-period Japan’s leading writer of ‘floating world’ literature both in their local context and as part of transnational trends in early bourgeois narrative.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Portraits of Edo and Early Modern Japan

Portraits of Edo and Early Modern Japan

Ryoi also annotated Japanese versions of Buddhist texts, compiled guide books such as the famous Tokaido meisho-ki (“A Record of ... 1662), and authored the influential collection of supernatural tales Otogi boko (“Hand Puppets,” pub.

Author: Gerald Groemer

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9789811373763

Category: History

Page: 372

View: 937

This volume presents a series of five portraits of Edo, the central region of urban space today known as Tokyo, from the great fire of 1657 to the devastating earthquake of 1855. This book endeavors to allow Edo, or at least some of the voices that constituted Edo, to do most of the speaking. These voices become audible in the work of five Japanese eye-witness observers, who notated what they saw, heard, felt, tasted, experienced, and remembered. “An Eastern Stirrup,” presents a vivid portrait of the great conflagration of 1657 that nearly wiped out the city. “Tales of Long Long Ago,” details seventeenth-century warrior-class ways as depicted by a particularly conservative samurai. “The River of Time,” describes the city and its flourishing cultural and economic development during the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. “The Spider’s Reel” looks back at both the attainments and calamities of Edo in the 1780s. Finally, “Disaster Days,” offers a meticulous account of Edo life among the ruins of the catastrophic 1855 tremor. Read in sequence, these five pieces offer a unique “insider’s perspective” on the city of Edo and early modern Japan.
Categories: History

The Tale of Chikusai

The Tale of Chikusai

head down the Tokaido for the eastern provinces . ... daijiten 13 * **** , wherein Chikusai is discussed on the basis of outdated research and with abundant sins of omission that all but encourage false conclusions about the text .

Author: Mitsuhiro Karasumaru

Publisher:

ISBN: UCAL:C2945860

Category:

Page: 182

View: 159

Categories:

Ghost in the Well

Ghost in the Well

... as one classification of the short prose tales in such collections as the twelfth-century text Konjaku monogatari-shū ... Kabuki playwright Tsuruya Nanboku IV's 1825 script for The Ghost Story of Yotsuya (Tōkaidō Yotsuya kaidan, ...

Author: Michael Crandol

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781350178755

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 272

View: 891

Ghost in the Well is the first study to provide a full history of the horror genre in Japanese cinema, from the silent era to Classical period movies such as Nakagawa Nobuo's Tokaido Yotsuya kaidan (1959) to the contemporary global popularity of J-horror pictures like the Ring and Ju-on franchises. Michael Crandol draws on a wide range of Japanese language sources, including magazines, posters and interviews with directors such as Kurosawa Kiyoshi, to consider the development of kaiki eiga, the Japanese phrase meaning "weird" or "bizarre" films that most closely corresponds to Western understandings of "horror". He traces the origins of kaika eiga in Japanese kabuki theatre and traditions of the monstrous feminine, showing how these traditional forms were combined with the style and conventions of Hollywood horror to produce an aesthetic that was both transnational and peculiarly Japanese. Ghost in the Well sheds new light on one of Japanese cinema's best-known genres, while also serving as a fascinating case study of how popular film genres are re-imagined across cultural divides.
Categories: Performing Arts

Diachrony of Personal Pronouns in Japanese

Diachrony of Personal Pronouns in Japanese

The main text used for Stage II is Genji monogatari 'The tale of Genji' (1002) by Murasaki Shikibu. ... I mainly use Ugetsu monogatari 'Tales of moonlight and rain' (1776) and Tokaido Yotsuya kaidan 'The ghost stories at Yotsuya at the ...

Author: Osamu Ishiyama

Publisher: John Benjamins Publishing Company

ISBN: 9789027262813

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 173

View: 369

Personal pronouns in Japanese form a heterogeneous category. This book investigates their historical development from a functional perspective. It shows that while nouns give rise to personal pronouns through semanticization of pragmatic inferences, the use of non-nominal forms such as demonstratives and reflexives for person referents can be resolved within their original functions, offering little reason to treat them as personal pronouns. The cross-linguistic investigation into the common sources of personal pronouns reveals that the development of personal pronouns from nouns is largely consistent with grammaticalization, but that of forms of non-nominal origins requires separate mechanisms such as spatial/empathetic perspectives and displacement of semantic features for politeness, showing that a one-size-fits-all approach to diachrony of personal pronouns is not sufficient. This book will be of special interest to researchers and students in historical linguistics, pragmatics, and Japanese linguistics, who take a functional view of language.
Categories: Language Arts & Disciplines

Paperbound Books in Print

Paperbound Books in Print

( Translated by Thomas The value of the book is enhanced Satchell ) . Tuttle . 414 pp . $ 2.50 by the printing of the Japanese and These comic tales of travel on the a Romanized text below the English . famous Tokaido , the legendary ...

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN: UOM:39015085501982

Category: Paperbacks

Page:

View: 263

Categories: Paperbacks

A Kamigata Anthology

A Kamigata Anthology

The guidebook translated in part here, Famous Places along the Tōkaidō (Tōkaidō Meishoki, ca. ... But it is also a fictionalized travel tale about the adventures on the road of a young monk named Raku Amida Butsu (literally, ...

Author: Sumie Jones

Publisher: University of Hawaii Press

ISBN: 9780824881764

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 544

View: 331

This is the first of a three-volume anthology of Edo- and Meiji-era urban literature that includes An Edo Anthology: Literature from Japan’s Mega-City, 1750–1850 and A Tokyo Anthology: Literature from Japan’s Modern Metropolis, 1850–1920. The present work focuses on the years in which bourgeois culture first emerged in Japan, telling the story of the rising commoner arts of Kamigata, or the “Upper Regions” of Kyoto and Osaka, which harkened back to Japan’s middle ages even as they rebelled against and competed with that earlier era. Both cities prided themselves on being models and trendsetters in all cultural matters, whether arts, crafts, books, or food. The volume also shows how elements of popular arts that germinated during this period ripened into the full-blown consumer culture of the late-Edo period. The tendency to imagine Japan’s modernity as a creation of Western influence since the mid-nineteenth century is still strong, particularly outside Japan studies. A Kamigata Anthology challenges such assumptions by illustrating the flourishing phenomenon of Japan’s movement into its own modernity through a selection of the best examples from the period, including popular genres such as haikai poetry, handmade picture scrolls, travel guidebooks, kabuki and joruri plays, prose narratives of contemporary life, and jokes told by professional entertainers. Well illustrated with prints from popular books of the time and hand scrolls and standing screens containing poems and commentaries, the entertaining and vibrant translations put a spotlight on texts currently unavailable in English.
Categories: Literary Collections

An Edo Anthology

An Edo Anthology

Tsuruya Nanboku IV, Epic Yotsuya Ghost Tale (Tókaido Yotsuya Kaidan, 1825). The original production book in ... Ryūtei Rijö, Eight Footloose Fools: A Flower Almanac (Hanagoyomi Hasshøjin, 494 SOURCE TEXTS AND Not O DE R N EDITIONS.

Author: Sumie Jones

Publisher: University of Hawaii Press

ISBN: 9780824837402

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 532

View: 714

During the eighteenth century, Edo (today’s Tokyo) became the world’s largest city, quickly surpassing London and Paris. Its rapidly expanding population and flourishing economy encouraged the development of a thriving popular culture. Innovative and ambitious young authors and artists soon began to look beyond the established categories of poetry, drama, and prose, banding together to invent completely new literary forms that focused on the fun and charm of Edo. Their writings were sometimes witty, wild, and bawdy, and other times sensitive, wise, and polished. Now some of these high spirited works, celebrating the rapid changes, extraordinary events, and scandalous news of the day, have been collected in an accessible volume highlighting the city life of Edo. Edo’s urban consumers demanded visual presentations and performances in all genres. Novelties such as books with text and art on the same page were highly sought after, as were kabuki plays and the polychrome prints that often shared the same themes, characters, and even jokes. Popular interest in sex and entertainment focused attention on the theatre district and “pleasure quarters,” which became the chief backdrops for the literature and arts of the period. Gesaku, or “playful writing,” invented in the mid-eighteenth century, satirized the government and samurai behavior while parodying the classics. These entertaining new styles bred genres that appealed to the masses. Among the bestsellers were lengthy serialized heroic epics, revenge dramas, ghost and monster stories, romantic melodramas, and comedies that featured common folk. An Edo Anthology offers distinctive and engaging examples of this broad range of genres and media. It includes both well-known masterpieces and unusual examples from the city’s counterculture, some popular with intellectuals, others with wider appeal. Some of the translations presented here are the first available in English and many are based on first editions. In bringing together these important and expertly translated Edo texts in a single volume, this collection will be warmly welcomed by students and interested readers of Japanese literature and popular culture.
Categories: Literary Criticism

The Scary Screen

The Scary Screen

Tokaido Yotsuya kaidan (Ghost Story ofYotsuya) is one of the most famous and popular ghost stories in Japan. ... The legend of Oiwa has been featured in a range of Japanese cultural texts, making it a very familiar tale for Japanese ...

Author: Dr Kristen Lacefield

Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.

ISBN: 9781409476191

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 248

View: 582

In 1991, the publication of Koji Suzuki's Ring, the first novel of a bestselling trilogy, inaugurated a tremendous outpouring of cultural production in Japan, Korea, and the United States. Just as the subject of the book is the deadly viral reproduction of a VHS tape, so, too, is the vast proliferation of text and cinematic productions suggestive of an airborne contagion with a life of its own. Analyzing the extraordinary trans-cultural popularity of the Ring phenomenon, The Scary Screen locates much of its power in the ways in which the books and films astutely graft contemporary cultural preoccupations onto the generic elements of the ghost story—in particular, the Japanese ghost story. At the same time, the contributors demonstrate, these cultural concerns are themselves underwritten by a range of anxieties triggered by the advent of new communications and media technologies, perhaps most significantly, the shift from analog to digital. Mimicking the phenomenon it seeks to understand, the collection's power comes from its commitment to the full range of Ring-related output and its embrace of a wide variety of interpretive approaches, as the contributors chart the mutations of the Ring narrative from author to author, from medium to medium, and from Japan to Korea to the United States.
Categories: Performing Arts

Edo Kabuki in Transition

Edo Kabuki in Transition

This ultimately led the magazine to replace the storytellers' tales with works by intellectual writers like Mori Ōgai. ... The Ghost Stories at Yotsuya on the Tōkaidō / Tōkaidō Yotsuya kaidan, in Darkness and Desire, 1804–1864, vol.

Author: Satoko Shimazaki

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 9780231540520

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 384

View: 392

Satoko Shimazaki revisits three centuries of kabuki theater, reframing it as a key player in the formation of an early modern urban identity in Edo Japan and exploring the process that resulted in its re-creation in Tokyo as a national theatrical tradition. Challenging the prevailing understanding of early modern kabuki as a subversive entertainment and a threat to shogunal authority, Shimazaki argues that kabuki instilled a sense of shared history in the inhabitants of Edo (present-day Tokyo) by invoking "worlds," or sekai, derived from earlier military tales, and overlaying them onto the present. She then analyzes the profound changes that took place in Edo kabuki toward the end of the early modern period, which witnessed the rise of a new type of character: the vengeful female ghost. Shimazaki's bold reinterpretation of the history of kabuki centers on the popular ghost play Tokaido Yotsuya kaidan (The Eastern Seaboard Highway Ghost Stories at Yotsuya, 1825) by Tsuruya Nanboku IV. Drawing not only on kabuki scripts but also on a wide range of other sources, from theatrical ephemera and popular fiction to medical and religious texts, she sheds light on the development of the ubiquitous trope of the vengeful female ghost and its illumination of new themes at a time when the samurai world was losing its relevance. She explores in detail the process by which nineteenth-century playwrights began dismantling the Edo tradition of "presenting the past" by abandoning their long-standing reliance on the sekai. She then reveals how, in the 1920s, a new generation of kabuki playwrights, critics, and scholars reinvented the form again, "textualizing" kabuki so that it could be pressed into service as a guarantor of national identity.
Categories: Literary Criticism