Thoreau s Late Career and The Dispersion of Seeds

Thoreau s Late Career and The Dispersion of Seeds

The first detailed study of a major but neglected work by Thoreau.

Author: Michael Berger

Publisher: Camden House

ISBN: 157113168X

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 153

View: 612

The first detailed study of a major but neglected work by Thoreau.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Faith in a Seed

Faith in a Seed

Faith in a Seed contains the hitherto unpublished work The Dispersion of Seeds, one of Henry D. Thoreau's last important research and writing projects, and now his first new book to appear in 125 years.With the remarkable clarity and grace ...

Author: Henry D. Thoreau

Publisher: Island Press

ISBN: 1597262870

Category: Nature

Page: 301

View: 567

Faith in a Seed contains the hitherto unpublished work The Dispersion of Seeds, one of Henry D. Thoreau's last important research and writing projects, and now his first new book to appear in 125 years.With the remarkable clarity and grace that characterize all of his writings, Thoreau describes the ecological succession of plant species through seed dispersal. The Dispersion of Seeds, which draws on Charles Darwin's theory of natural selection, refutes the then widely accepted theory that some plants spring spontaneously to life, independent of roots, cuttings, or seeds. As Thoreau wrote: "Though I do not believe a plant will spring up where no seed has been, I have great faith in a seed. Convince me that you have a seed there, and I am prepared to expect wonders." Henry D. Thoreau's Faith in a Seed, was first published in hardcover in 1993 by Island Press under the Shearwater Books imprint, which unifies scientific views of nature with humanistic ones. This important work, the first publication of Thoreau's last manuscript, is now available in paperback. Faith in a Seed contains Thoreau's last important research and writing project, The Dispersion of Seeds, along with other natural history writings from late in his life. Edited by Bradley P. Dean, professor of English at East Carolina University and editor of the Thoreau Society Bulletin, these writings demonstrate how a major American author at the height of his career succeeded in making science and literature mutually enriching.
Categories: Nature

Natural Life

Natural Life

30. Berger , Thoreau's Late Career , 24 , 26. Berger discusses the importance of The Dispersion of Seeds to Thoreau's later natural history projects , and places the work in the context of midnineteenth - century scientific discourse ...

Author: David Robinson

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 080144313X

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 234

View: 903

Explains why, 150 years after the publication of Walden, this key work of Henry David Thoreau remains fascinating and important, in an in-depth look at the life of the author and his ideas on personal growth, with special interest paid to the later phases of his career.
Categories: Biography & Autobiography

Nineteenth Century American Literature and the Discourse of Natural History

Nineteenth Century American Literature and the Discourse of Natural History

Bradford Torrey and Francis H. Allen, vols. i–vii (1837–October, 1855) (New York: Dover Publications, Inc., 1962), ii: 45. 4. Henry David Thoreau, “The Dispersion of Seeds,” in Faith in a Seed: The Dispersion of Seeds, and Other Late ...

Author: Juliana Chow

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781108845717

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 290

View: 126

This book discusses how literary writers re-envisioned species survival and racial uplift through ecological and biogeographical concepts of dispersal. It will appeal to readers interested in nineteenth-Century American literature and Literature and the Environment.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Encyclopedia of Transcendentalism

Encyclopedia of Transcendentalism

Thoreau's research throughout the previous decade had led him to an answer: animals and wind carry seeds from one area to another and, ... Thoreau's Later Career and The Dispersion of Seeds: The Saunterer's Synoptic Vision.

Author: Tiffany K. Wayne

Publisher: Infobase Publishing

ISBN: 9781438109169

Category: American literature

Page: 385

View: 469

Presents a reference guide to transcendentalism, with articles on significant works, writers, concepts and more.
Categories: American literature

Nineteenth Century Prose

Nineteenth Century Prose

McGregor also notes , however , the importance of Emerson's influence in encouraging Thoreau to begin his career as a writer . ... and Michael Benjamin Berger , Thoreau's Late Career and " The Dispersion of Seeds .

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN: UOM:39015066121057

Category: English literature

Page:

View: 241

Categories: English literature

Thoreau s Third Book

Thoreau s Third Book

Author: Michael Benjamin Berger

Publisher:

ISBN: OCLC:37755511

Category: Nature in literature

Page: 376

View: 507

Categories: Nature in literature

The Cambridge Companion to Literature and the Environment

The Cambridge Companion to Literature and the Environment

Michael Benjamin Berger, Thoreau's Late Career and The Dispersion of Seeds: The Saunterer's Synoptic Vision (Rochester, NY: Camden House, 2000), p. 19, note 13 . Thoreau, Wild Apples, pp. 93–94. Ibid., p. 94. Ibid., p. 94. Ibid., p. 94.

Author: Louise Westling

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781107029927

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 286

View: 156

This authoritative collection of rigorous but accessible essays investigates the exciting new interdisciplinary field of environmental literary criticism.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Civilizing Thoreau

Civilizing Thoreau

“The Dispersion of Seeds” is generally viewed as an example of Thoreau's late shift to purely scientific writing. ... Robert Sattelmeyer, however, adds an important qualification to this popular view of Thoreau's late career by ...

Author: Richard J. Schneider

Publisher: Boydell & Brewer

ISBN: 9781571139603

Category: Ecocriticism

Page: 212

View: 271

7: Nature and the Origins of American Civilization in Cape Cod -- Part IV. America's Destiny and Ecological Succession -- 8: Thoreau and Manifest Destiny -- Works Cited -- Index
Categories: Ecocriticism

Uncertain Chances

Uncertain Chances

... Michael Berger, Thoreau's Late Career and The Dispersion of Seeds (Rochester, N.Y.: Camden, 2000), 78 (“higher empiricism”); Laura Dassow Walls, Seeing New Worlds: Henry David Thoreau and NineteenthCentury Natural Science (Madison: ...

Author: Maurice S. Lee

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199985814

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 569

Maurice Lee's study illustrates how writers such as Poe, Melville, Douglass, Thoreau, Dickinson, and others participated in a broad intellectual and cultural shift in which Americans increasingly learned to live with the threatening and wonderful possibilities of chance.
Categories: History

Henry David Thoreau

Henry David Thoreau

“From Thoreau to Queer Politics,” Yale Journal of Criticism 6.3 (1993): 17–27. Adams, Raymond. ... Thoreau Society Bulletin 24 ( July 1948): 3–7. ... Thoreau's Late Career and “The Dispersion of Seeds”: The Saunterer's Synoptic Vision.

Author: Laura Dassow Walls

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226599373

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 640

View: 458

"Walden. Yesterday I came here to live." That entry from the journal of Henry David Thoreau, and the intellectual journey it began, would by themselves be enough to place Thoreau in the American pantheon. His attempt to "live deliberately" in a small woods at the edge of his hometown of Concord has been a touchstone for individualists and seekers since the publication of Walden in 1854. But there was much more to Thoreau than his brief experiment in living at Walden Pond. A member of the vibrant intellectual circle centered on his neighbor Ralph Waldo Emerson, he was also an ardent naturalist, a manual laborer and inventor, a radical political activist, and more. Many books have taken up various aspects of Thoreau's character and achievements, but, as Laura Dassow Walls writes, "Thoreau has never been captured between covers; he was too quixotic, mischievous, many-sided." Two hundred years after his birth, and two generations after the last full-scale biography, Walls renews Henry David Thoreau for us in all his profound, inspiring complexity. Drawing on Thoreau's copious writings, published and unpublished, Walls presents a Thoreau vigorously alive, full of quirks and contradictions: the young man shattered by the sudden death of his brother; the ambitious Harvard College student; the ecstatic visionary who closed Walden with an account of the regenerative power of the Cosmos. We meet the man whose belief in human freedom and the value of labor made him an uncompromising abolitionist; the solitary walker who found society in nature, but also found his own nature in the society of which he was a deeply interwoven part. And, running through it all, Thoreau the passionate naturalist, who, long before the age of environmentalism, saw tragedy for future generations in the human heedlessness around him. "The Thoreau I sought was not in any book, so I wrote this one," says Walls. The result is a Thoreau unlike any seen since he walked the streets of Concord, a Thoreau for our time and all time.--Dust jacket.
Categories: Biography & Autobiography

Henry David Thoreau in Context

Henry David Thoreau in Context

Thoreau's Late Career and “The Dispersion of Seeds”: The Saunterer's Synoptic Vision. Rochester, NY: Camden House, 2000. Richards, Robert J. The Meaning of Evolution: The Morphological Construction and Ideological Reconstruction of ...

Author: James S. Finley

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781108500975

Category: Literary Criticism

Page:

View: 651

Well known for his contrarianism and solitude, Henry David Thoreau was nonetheless deeply responsive to the world around him. His writings bear the traces of his wide-ranging reading, travels, political interests, and social influences. Henry David Thoreau in Context brings together leading scholars of Thoreau and nineteenth-century American literature and culture and presents original research, valuable synthesis of historical and scholarly sources, and innovative readings of Thoreau's texts. Across thirty-four chapters, this collection reveals a Thoreau deeply concerned with and shaped by a diverse range of environments, intellectual traditions, social issues, and modes of scientific practice. Essays also illuminate important posthumous contexts and consider the specific challenges of contextualizing Thoreau today. This collection provides a rich understanding of Thoreau and nineteenth-century American literature, political activism, and environmentalist thinking that will be a vital resource for students, teachers, scholars, and general readers.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Thoreauvian Modernities

Thoreauvian Modernities

Thoreau's Late Career and “The Dispersion of Seeds”: The Saunterer's Synoptic Vision. Rochester, NY: Camden House, 2000. Bhaskar, Roy. A Realist Theory ofScience. Sussex: Harvester, 1978. — . ReclaimingReality: A Critical Introduction ...

Author: François Specq

Publisher: University of Georgia Press

ISBN: 9780820344294

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 310

View: 131

Does Thoreau belong to the past or to the future? Instead of canonizing him as a celebrant of “pure” nature apart from the corruption of civilization, the essays in Thoreauvian Modernities reveal edgier facets of his work—how Thoreau is able to unsettle as well as inspire and how he is able to focus on both the timeless and the timely. Contributors from the United States and Europe explore Thoreau's modernity and give a much-needed reassessment of his work in a global context. The first of three sections, “Thoreau and (Non)Modernity,” views Thoreau as a social thinker who set himself against the “modern” currents of his day even while contributing to the emergence of a new era. By questioning the place of humans in the social, economic, natural, and metaphysical order, he ushered in a rethinking of humanity's role in the natural world that nurtured the environmental movement. The second section, “Thoreau and Philosophy,” examines Thoreau's writings in light of the philosophy of his time as well as current philosophical debates. Section three, “Thoreau, Language, and the Wild,” centers on his relationship to wild nature in its philosophical, scientific, linguistic, and literary dimensions. Together, these sixteen essays reveal Thoreau's relevance to a number of fields, including science, philosophy, aesthetics, environmental ethics, political science, and animal studies. Thoreauvian Modernities posits that it is the germinating power of Thoreau's thought—the challenge it poses to our own thinking and its capacity to address pressing issues in a new way—that defines his enduring relevance and his modernity. Contributors: Kristen Case, Randall Conrad, David Dowling, Michel Granger, Michel Imbert, Michael Jonik, Christian Maul, Bruno Monfort, Henrik Otterberg, Tom Pughe, David M. Robinson, William Rossi, Dieter Schulz, François Specq, Joseph Urbas, Laura Dassow Walls.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Wild Apples and Other Natural History Essays

Wild Apples and Other Natural History Essays

Henry David Thoreau William John Rossi ... Rev. of Faith in a Seed, by Henry D. Thoreau. BioScience 44 (1994): 184. Bennett, Jane. ... Thoreau's Late Career and “The Dispersion of Seeds”: The Saunterer's Synoptic Vision.

Author: Henry David Thoreau

Publisher: University of Georgia Press

ISBN: 9780820326368

Category: Nature

Page: 272

View: 775

This volume of seven essays and a late lecture by Henry David Thoreau makes available important material written both before and after Walden. First appearing in the 1840s through the 1860s, the essays were written during a time of great change in Thoreau's environs, as the Massachusetts of his childhood became increasingly urbanized and industrialized. William Rossi's introduction puts the essays in the context of Thoreau's other major works, both chronologically and intellectually. Rossi also shows how these writings relate to Thoreau's life and career as both writer and naturalist: his readings of Ralph Waldo Emerson and Charles Darwin; his failed bid for commercial acceptance of his work; and his pivotal encounter with the utter wildness of the Maine woods. In the essays themselves, readers will see how Thoreau melded conventions of natural history writing with elements of two popular literary forms--travel writing and landscape writing--to explore concerns ranging from America's westward expansion to the figural dimensions of scientific facts and phenomena. Thoreau the thinker, observer, wanderer, and inquiring naturalist--all emerge in this distinctive composite picture of the economic, natural, and spiritual communities that left their marks on one of our most important early environmentalists.
Categories: Nature

The Redemption

The Redemption

In the nineteenth century, Henry David Thoreau and Herman Melville provide fascinating and instructive examples of ... Thoreau's Late Career and the Dispersion of Seeds (Rochester, NY: Camden House, 2000); David R. Foster, Thoreau's ...

Author: Stephen T. Davis

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 9780191556593

Category: Religion

Page: 392

View: 407

This interdisciplinary study follows an international and ecumenical meeting of twenty-one scholars held in New York at Easter 2003: the Redemption Summit. After an opening chapter, which explores seven central questions for writers on redemption, five chapters are dedicated to the scriptural roots of the doctrine. A section on the patristic and medieval periods then examines the interpretation of redemption through the centuries. The volume moves on to foundational and systematic issues: the problem of horrendous evil, karma and grace, and differing views on justification. Studies on the redemption in literature, art, music, and preaching form the final part. There is a fruitful dialogue between experts in a wide range of areas and the international reputation of the participants reflects and guarantees the high quality of this joint work. The result is a well researched, skilfully argued, and, at times, provocative volume on the central Christian belief: the redemption of human beings through Jesus Christ.
Categories: Religion

The Transcendentalists

The Transcendentalists

Lindisfarne Books , 2001 ) ; Sam McGuire Worley , Emerson , Thoreau , and the Role of the Cultural Critic ( Albany : State ... Thoreau's Late Career and the Dispersion of Seeds : The Saunterer's Synoptic Vision ( Rochester , N.Y .

Author: Barbara L. Packer

Publisher: University of Georgia Press

ISBN: 0820329576

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 304

View: 639

Barbara L. Packer's long essay "The Transcendentalists" is widely acknowledged by scholars of nineteenth-century American literary history as the best-written, most comprehensive treatment to date of Transcendentalism. Previously existing only as part of a volume in the magisterial Cambridge History of American Literature, it will now be available for the first time in a stand-alone edition. Packer presents Transcendentalism as a living movement, evolving out of such origins as New England Unitarianism and finding early inspiration in European Romanticism. Transcendentalism changed religious beliefs, philosophical ideas, literary styles, and political allegiances. In addition, it was a social movement whose members collaborated on projects and formed close personal ties. Transcendentalism contains vigorous thought and expression throughout, says Packer; only a study of the entire movement can explain its continuing sway over American thought. Through fresh readings of both the essential Transcendentalist texts and the best current scholarship, Packer conveys the movement's genuine expectations that its radical spirituality not only would lead to personal perfection but also would inspire solutions to such national problems as slavery and disfranchisement. Here is Transcendentalism in whole, with Emerson, Thoreau, and Fuller restored to their place alongside such contemporaries as Bronson Alcott, George Ripley, Jones Very, Theodore Parker, James Freeman Clarke, Orestes Brownson, and Frederick Henry Hedge.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Journal

Journal

... David Thoreau and Nineteenth - Century Natural Science ( Madison : University of Wisconsin Press , 1995 ) ; Michael Berger , Thoreau's Late Career and " The Dispersion of Seeds " : The Saunterer's Synoptic Vision ( Rochester , N.Y .

Author: Henry David Thoreau

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 0691065411

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 528

View: 561

From 1837 to 1861, Thoreau kept a Journal that began as a conventional record of ideas, grew into a writer's notebook, and eventually became the principal imaginative work of his career. The source of much of his published writing, the Journal is also a record of his interior life and of his monumental studies of the natural history of his native Concord, Massachusetts. Unlike earlier editions, the Princeton edition reproduces the Journal in its original and complete form, in a reading text free of editorial interpolations but keyed to a comprehensive scholarly apparatus. Journal 8: 1854 is edited from the 467-page notebook that Thoreau kept February 13-September 3, 1854. It reveals him as an increasingly confident taxonomist creating lists that distill his observations about plant leafing and seasonal birds. Two particularly significant public events took place in his life in the summer of 1854. On July 4, at an antislavery rally at Framingham, Massachusetts, Thoreau appeared for the first time in the company of prominent abolitionists, delivering as heated a statement against slavery as he had yet made. And on August 9, Ticknor and Fields published Walden, the book Thoreau had been working on since 1846. In Journal 8 Thoreau indicates that these public accomplishments, though satisfying, took a toll on his creative life and did not fully compensate him for the hours spent away from the woods.
Categories: Biography & Autobiography

Thoreau and the Language of Trees

Thoreau and the Language of Trees

... Richardson, Henry Thoreau, 340–45, 385; Stoller, After Walden, 77–89; and Berger, Thoreau's Late Career, 24–32, 58–68. p. 78 Not until 1993: On the recovery and publication of Thoreau's “The Dispersion of Seeds” by Bradley Dean, ...

Author: Richard Higgins

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520294042

Category: Science

Page: 248

View: 102

Trees were central to Henry David Thoreau’s creativity as a writer, his work as a naturalist, his thought, and his inner life. His portraits of them were so perfect, it was as if he could see the sap flowing beneath their bark. When Thoreau wrote that the poet loves the pine tree as his own shadow in the air, he was speaking about himself. In short, he spoke their language. In this original book, Richard Higgins explores Thoreau’s deep connections to trees: his keen perception of them, the joy they gave him, the poetry he saw in them, his philosophical view of them, and how they fed his soul. His lively essays show that trees were a thread connecting all parts of Thoreau’s being—heart, mind, and spirit. Included are one hundred excerpts from Thoreau’s writings about trees, paired with over sixty of the author’s photographs. Thoreau’s words are as vivid now as they were in 1890, when an English naturalist wrote that he was unusually able to “to preserve the flashing forest colors in unfading light.” Thoreau and the Language of Trees shows that Thoreau, with uncanny foresight, believed trees were essential to the preservation of the world.
Categories: Science

Emerson s Life in Science

Emerson s Life in Science

Philadelphia: Carey, Lea, and Blanchard, 1835. Berger, Michael. Thoreau's Late Career and “The Dispersion of Seeds.” Rochester, N.Y.: Camden House, 2000. Bishop, Jonathan. Emerson on the Soul. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, I964.

Author: Laura Dassow Walls

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 9781501717390

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 296

View: 445

Ralph Waldo Emerson has traditionally been cast as a dreamer and a mystic, concerned with the ideals of transcendentalism rather than the realities of contemporary science and technology. In Laura Dassow Walls's view Emerson was a leader of the secular avant-garde in his day. He helped to establish science as the popular norm of truth in America and to modernize American popular thought. In addition, he became a hero to a post-Darwinian generation of Victorian Dissenters, exemplifying the strong connection between transcendentalism and later nineteenth-century science. In his early years as a minister, Emerson read widely in natural philosophy (or physics), chemistry, geology, botany, and comparative anatomy. When he left the church, it was to seek the truths written in the book of nature rather than in books of scripture. While visiting the Paris Museum of Natural History during his first European tour, Emerson experienced a revelation so intense that he declared, "I will be a naturalist." Once he was back in the United States, his first step in realizing this ambition was to deliver a series of lectures on natural science. These lectures formed the basis for his first publication, Nature (1836), and his writings ever after reflected his intense and continuing interest in science. Walls finds that Emerson matured just as the concept of "the two cultures" emerged, when the disciplines of literature and science were divorcing each other even as he called repeatedly for their marriage. Consequently, Walls writes, half of Emerson's thought has been invisible to us: science was central to Emerson, to his language, to the basic organization of his career. In Emerson's Life in Science, she makes the case that no study of literary history can be complete without embracing science as part of literature. Conversely, she maintains, no history of science is complete unless we consider the role played by writers of literature who helped to install science in the popular imagination.
Categories: Literary Criticism

American Literary Scholarship

American Literary Scholarship

In “ The Saunterer's Vision : Henry Thoreau's Epiphany of Forest Dynamics in The Dispersion of Seeds ” ( CS n.s. 4 : 45–71 ) Berger describes Thoreau's later pattern of field investigation , calling The Dispersion of Seeds “ an ...

Author: James Leslie Woodress

Publisher:

ISBN: UOM:39015068947186

Category: American literature

Page:

View: 457

Categories: American literature