This Is Shakespeare

This Is Shakespeare

The Shakespeare in this book poses awkward questions rather than offering bland answers, always implicating us in working out what it might mean. This is Shakespeare. And he needs your attention.

Author: Emma Smith

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN: 9780241361641

Category: Drama

Page: 320

View: 275

A THE TIMES BOOK OF THE YEAR 2019 'The best introduction to the plays I've read, perhaps the best book on Shakespeare, full stop' Alex Preston, Observer 'It makes you impatient to see or re-read the plays at once' Hilary Mantel A genius and prophet whose timeless works encapsulate the human condition like no others. A writer who surpassed his contemporaries in vision, originality and literary mastery. Who wrote like an angel, putting it all so much better than anyone else. Is this Shakespeare? Well, sort of. But it doesn't really tell us the whole truth. So much of what we say about Shakespeare is either not true, or just not relevant, deflecting us from investigating the challenges of his inconsistencies and flaws. This electrifying new book thrives on revealing, not resolving, the ambiguities of Shakespeare's plays and their changing topicality. It introduces an intellectually, theatrically and ethically exciting writer who engages with intersectionality as much as with Ovid, with economics as much as poetry: who writes in strikingly modern ways about individual agency, privacy, politics, celebrity and sex. It takes us into a world of politicking and copy-catting, as we watch him emulating the blockbusters of Christopher Marlowe and Thomas Kyd, the Spielberg and Tarantino of their day; flirting with and skirting round the cut-throat issues of succession politics, religious upheaval and technological change. The Shakespeare in this book poses awkward questions rather than offering bland answers, always implicating us in working out what it might mean. This is Shakespeare. And he needs your attention.
Categories: Drama

Is Shakespeare Dead

Is Shakespeare Dead

It was published in April 1909 by Harper & Brothers, twelve months before Mark Twain's death. Ê The book attracted controversy for incorporating a chapter from The Shakespeare Problem Restated by George Greenwood without permission or ...

Author: Mark Twain

Publisher: Library of Alexandria

ISBN: 9781613100417

Category: Fiction

Page: 86

View: 522

ÊIs Shakespeare Dead? is a short, semi-autobiographical work by American humorist Mark Twain. It explores the controversy over the authorship of the Shakespearean literary canon via satire, anecdote, and extensive quotation of contemporary authors on the subject. Ê The original publication spans only 150 pages, and the formatting leaves roughly half of each page blank. The spine is thread bound. It was published in April 1909 by Harper & Brothers, twelve months before Mark Twain's death. Ê The book attracted controversy for incorporating a chapter from The Shakespeare Problem Restated by George Greenwood without permission or proper credit, an oversight Twain blamed on the accidental omission of a footnote by the printer. Ê The book has been described as "one of his least well received and most misunderstood works". Although she admits that Twain appears to have been sincere in his beliefs concerning Shakespeare, Karen Lystra argues that the essay reveals satirical intentions that went beyond the ShakespeareÑBacon controversy of the time. Ê Though it is commonly assumed to be nothing more than a stale and embarrassing rehash of the Shakespeare-Bacon controversy, Twain was up to something more than flimsy literary criticism. He was using the debate over Shakespeare's real identity to satirize prejudice, intolerance, and self-importanceÑin himself as well as others.... But after his passionate diatribe against the "Stratfordolators" and his vigorous support of the Baconians, he cheerfully admits that both sides are built on inference. Leaving no doubt about his satirical intent, Twain then gleefully subverts his entire argument. After seeming to be a serious, even angry, combatant, he denies that he intended to convince anyone that Shakespeare was not the real author of his works. "It would grieve me to know that any one could think so injuriously of me, so uncomplimentarily, so unadmiringly of me," he writes mockingly. "Would I be so soft as that, after having known the human race familiarly for nearly seventy-four years?" We get our beliefs at second hand, he explains, "we reason none of them out for ourselves. It is the way we are made." Twain has set a trapÑan elaborate joke at the expense of what he scornfully refers to as the "Reasoning Race." He is satirizing the need to win an argument when it is virtually impossible to convince anyone to change sides in almost any debate. His excessive rhetoric of attack is obviously absurdÑcalling the other side "thugs," for exampleÑyet it has been taken at face value.
Categories: Fiction

Is Shakespeare Still Our Contemporary

Is Shakespeare Still Our Contemporary

First published in 2004. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Author: John Elsom

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781134950355

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 208

View: 438

First published in 2004. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
Categories: Performing Arts

Shylock Is Shakespeare

Shylock Is Shakespeare

What explains the strange and enduring force of this character, so unlike that of any other in Shakespeare’s plays? Kenneth Gross posits that the figure of Shylock is so powerful because he is the voice of Shakespeare himself.

Author: Kenneth Gross

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226309927

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 216

View: 281

Shylock, the Jewish moneylender in The Merchant of Venice who famously demands a pound of flesh as security for a loan to his antisemitic tormentors, is one of Shakespeare’s most complex and idiosyncratic characters. With his unsettling eloquence and his varying voices of protest, play, rage, and refusal, Shylock remains a source of perennial fascination. What explains the strange and enduring force of this character, so unlike that of any other in Shakespeare’s plays? Kenneth Gross posits that the figure of Shylock is so powerful because he is the voice of Shakespeare himself. Marvelously speculative and articulate, Gross’s book argues that Shylock is a breakthrough for Shakespeare the playwright, an early realization of the Bard’s power to create dramatic voices that speak for hidden, unconscious, even inhuman impulses—characters larger than the plays that contain them and ready to escape the author’s control. Shylock is also a mask for Shakespeare’s own need, rage, vulnerability, and generosity, giving form to Shakespeare’s ambition as an author and his uncertain bond with the audience. Gross’s vision of Shylock as Shakespeare’s covert double leads to a probing analysis of the character’s peculiar isolation, ambivalence, opacity, and dark humor. Addressing the broader resonance of Shylock, both historical and artistic, Gross examines the character’s hold on later readers and writers, including Heinrich Heine and Philip Roth, suggesting that Shylock mirrors the ambiguous states of Jewishness in modernity. A bravura critical performance, Shylock Is Shakespeare will fascinate readers with its range of reference, its union of rigor and play, and its conjectural—even fictive—means of coming to terms with the question of Shylock, ultimately taking readers to the very heart of Shakespeare’s humanizing genius.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Bacon Is Shakespeare

Bacon Is Shakespeare

Author: Edwin Durning-Lawrence

Publisher: Barman Press

ISBN: 9781443774031

Category: History

Page: 76

View: 769

PREFACE. THE Author of this very practical treatise on Scotch Loch - Fishing desires clearly that it may be of use to all who had it. He does not pretend to have written anything new, but to have attempted to put what he has to say in as readable a form as possible. Everything in the way of the history and habits of fish has been studiously avoided, and technicalities have been used as sparingly as possible. The writing of this book has afforded him pleasure in his leisure moments, and that pleasure would be much increased if he knew that the perusal of it would create any bond of sympathy between himself and the angling community in general. This section is interleaved with blank shects for the readers notes. The Author need hardly say that any suggestions addressed to the case of the publishers, will meet with consideration in a future edition. We do not pretend to write or enlarge upon a new subject. Much has been said and written-and well said and written too on the art of fishing but loch-fishing has been rather looked upon as a second-rate performance, and to dispel this idea is one of the objects for which this present treatise has been written. Far be it from us to say anything against fishing, lawfully practised in any form but many pent up in our large towns will bear us out when me say that, on the whole, a days loch-fishing is the most convenient. One great matter is, that the loch-fisher is depend- ent on nothing but enough wind to curl the water, -and on a large loch it is very seldom that a dead calm prevails all day, -and can make his arrangements for a day, weeks beforehand whereas the stream- fisher is dependent for a good take on the state of the water and however pleasant and easy it may be for one living near the banks of a good trout stream or river, it is quite another matter to arrange for a days river-fishing, if one is looking forward to a holiday at a date some weeks ahead. Providence may favour the expectant angler with a good day, and the water in order but experience has taught most of us that the good days are in the minority, and that, as is the case with our rapid running streams, -such as many of our northern streams are, -the water is either too large or too small, unless, as previously remarked, you live near at hand, and can catch it at its best. A common belief in regard to loch-fishing is, that the tyro and the experienced angler have nearly the same chance in fishing, -the one from the stern and the other from the bow of the same boat. Of all the absurd beliefs as to loch-fishing, this is one of the most absurd. Try it. Give the tyro either end of the boat he likes give him a cast of ally flies he may fancy, or even a cast similar to those which a crack may be using and if he catches one for every three the other has, he may consider himself very lucky. Of course there are lochs where the fish are not abundant, and a beginner may come across as many as an older fisher but we speak of lochs where there are fish to be caught, and where each has a fair chance. Again, it is said that the boatman has as much to do with catching trout in a loch as the angler. Well, we dont deny that. In an untried loch it is necessary to have the guidance of a good boatman but the same argument holds good as to stream-fishing...
Categories: History

Pursuing Shakespeare s Dramaturgy

Pursuing Shakespeare s Dramaturgy

This book is about Shakespeare's stagecraft.

Author: John C. Meagher

Publisher: Fairleigh Dickinson Univ Press

ISBN: 0838639933

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 489

View: 944

This book is about Shakespeare's stagecraft. It presents examinations of the conditions under which Shakespeare worked, including limitations and opportunities offered by circumstances that affected how his plays were written. It attempts to recover more in Shakespeare's plays than is normally appreciated, and to discover previously unnoticed dramatic strategies embedded in the Shakespearean texts. The book is aimed at Shakespeare as a playwright - or, more exactly, a playmaker - of his time. It considers only the earliest texts of the plays, only the resources available when they were written, and only what can be seen in the plays in conjunctions with the evidences from the days of Shakespeare's career. It is especially concerned with what can be said about Shakespeare's intentions as he shaped his plays. There are, the book maintains, important but still inadequately appreciated dramatic designs built into the plays, and there are clever strategies that have gone unnoticed but may yet be discerned by the careful application of dramaturgical analysis. The Shakespeare studied in this book is Shakespeare the playmaker, engaged in every step of the process from the first draft of the text to the performance before a live audience. This, the author contends, is the Shakespeare that is most essential, the Shakespeare who should be known as the foundation underlying any other treatment of the plays, and the Shakespeare most exciting and rewarding to pursue.
Categories: Literary Criticism

1601

1601

Author: Mark Twain

Publisher:

ISBN: 019973349X

Category: Great Britain

Page: 178

View: 260

Categories: Great Britain

Shakespeare and the Book

Shakespeare and the Book

An account of Shakespeare's plays as they were transformed from scripts into books.

Author: David Scott Kastan

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521786517

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 167

View: 127

An account of Shakespeare's plays as they were transformed from scripts into books.
Categories: Literary Collections

De Vere is Shakespeare

De Vere is Shakespeare

Author: Dennis E. Baron

Publisher: Cambridge Bibles

ISBN: UOM:39015041919781

Category: English drama

Page: 148

View: 238

Categories: English drama

The Friendly Shakespeare

The Friendly Shakespeare

Discusses Shakespeare's life and times, modern interpretations of his plays, and questions about their authorship

Author: Norrie Epstein

Publisher: Viking Adult

ISBN: MINN:31951D00970730L

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 550

View: 410

Discusses Shakespeare's life and times, modern interpretations of his plays, and questions about their authorship
Categories: Literary Criticism

Shakespeare and London

Shakespeare and London

This book presents new research about Shakespeare's connections with London.

Author: Duncan Salkeld

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780198709947

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 224

View: 518

This volume takes an historical approach to Shakespeare's connections with London. It explores Stratford's established links with the capital, significant locations for Shakespeare's work, the people with whom he associated, his resistance to the pressure from the City authorities, and thecultural diversity of early modern London. Among many features of his life in the City and its environs, it covers the playhouses in Shoreditch, his associations with Bishopsgate, his brother Edmund's residence on Bankside, and aspects of London life that went into the making of Falstaff. Stratfordmade the man, but London made the phenomenon that is Shakespeare. Yet, being "forest born", he was always an outsider and could never have been a citizen. We find him repeatedly a sojourner in the City, often on the move. His home and family lay in Stratford. We might almost imagine him a reluctantLondoner. Shakespeare and London draws on a range of documentary sources including City parish registers and the archives of London's Bridewell Hospital and seeks to acknowledge those who inhabited Shakespeare's milieu, or played some part in shaping his writing and acting career. This volume is Ideal readingfor undergraduates, graduates, and specialists of Shakespeare studies.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Shakespeare Survey 73

Shakespeare Survey 73

The theme for Volume 73 is 'Shakespeare and the City'.

Author: Emma Smith

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781108909662

Category: Literary Criticism

Page:

View: 453

Shakespeare Survey is a yearbook of Shakespeare studies and production. Since 1948, Survey has published the best international scholarship in English and many of its essays have become classics of Shakespeare criticism. Each volume is devoted to a theme, or play, or group of plays; each also contains a section of reviews of that year's textual and critical studies and of the year's major British performances. The theme for Volume 73 is 'Shakespeare and the City'. The complete set of Survey volumes is also available online at https://www.cambridge.org/core/what-we-publish/collections/shakespeare-survey This fully searchable resource enables users to browse by author, essay and volume, search by play, theme and topic and save and bookmark their results.
Categories: Literary Criticism

1601

1601

Author: Mark Twain

Publisher: ICON Group International

ISBN:

Category: Great Britain

Page: 178

View: 845

The first work is a short parody of Elizabethan England. The second is a study of Shakespeare's role in English literature and by extension, Twain's place in history.
Categories: Great Britain

Why Shakespeare

Why Shakespeare

Why is Shakespeare as highly regarded now as he ever has been? This book's answer to this question counters claims that Shakespeare's iconic status is no more than an accident of history.

Author: Catherine Belsey

Publisher: Macmillan International Higher Education

ISBN: 9781137067760

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 208

View: 329

Why is Shakespeare as highly regarded now as he ever has been? This book's answer to this question counters claims that Shakespeare's iconic status is no more than an accident of history. The plays, Belsey argues, entice us into a world we recognize by retelling traditional fairy tales with a difference, each chapter providing a detailed reading.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Shakespeare and the Body Politic

Shakespeare and the Body Politic

The chapters in Shakespeare and the Body Politic examine the tensions between the passion and ambition of individuals and the limits of the political communities that encompass and inform them.

Author: Bernard J. Dobski

Publisher: Lexington Books

ISBN: 9780739170960

Category: Political Science

Page: 290

View: 577

The chapters in Shakespeare and the Body Politic examine the tensions between the passion and ambition of individuals and the limits of the political communities that encompass and inform them. Shakespeare provides his audiences and readers both timely and timeless political lessons through his diverse portraits of the body politic in his plays and poetry–from ancient city-states of Greece and Rome to the early modern cities and kingdoms of his own time.
Categories: Political Science