The Xenotext

The Xenotext

Enciphered in a bacterium, The Xenotext is the world's first living poem

Author: Christian Bök

Publisher:

ISBN: 1552453219

Category: Poetry

Page: 159

View: 865

The first work of 'living poetry' in the world, by the author of the bestselling book Eunoia Shortlisted for the 2016 Stephan G. Stephansson Award for Poetry (Alberta Literary Awards) Internationally renowned poet Christian Bök has encoded a poem (called 'Orpheus') into the genome of a germ so that, in reply, the cell builds a protein that encodesyet another poem (called 'Eurydice'). After having illustrated this idea in E. coli, Bök is planning to insert his poem into a deathless bacterium (D. radiodurans), thereby writing a text able to outlive every apocalypse, enduring till the Sun itself expires. Book 1 of The Xenotext is an 'infernal grimoire' that introduces readers to the conceptual groundwork for this project. The book offers a primer in genetics, even as it revisits the pastoral heritage of poetry, updating the orphic idylls of Virgil for a new age of mythic danger - be it in the beauty of artful biogenesis, if not in the terror of global extinction. 'The cellular "rules" that govern this extraordinary text allow Bök to create one of the most beautiful poems of our time - a poem in which the georgics of Virgil join forces with the double helix of Watson and Crick.' - Marjorie Perloff 'If Human reverence was slanted more toward Nature and less toward the exaltation of gods, our scriptures might have looked something like The Xenotext.' - Peter Watts 'Many artists seek to attain immortality through their art, but few would expect their work to outlast the human race and live on for billions of years. As Canadian poet Christian Bök has realized, it all comes down to the durability of your materials.' - The Guardian
Categories: Poetry

The Xenotext

The Xenotext

Contents: Book1. isbn 978-1-55245-321-6 (book 1: paperback) I. Title. ps8553.o4727x45 2015 c811'.54 c2015-905022-7 The Xenotext (Book 1) is available as an ebook: isbn 978 177056 4343 Purchase of the print version of this book entitles ...

Author: Christian Bök

Publisher: Coach House Books

ISBN: 9781770564343

Category: Poetry

Page: 160

View: 516

"Many artists seek to attain immortality through their art, but few would expect their work to outlast the human race and live on for billions of years. As Canadian poet Christian Bök has realized, it all comes down to the durability of your materials."—The Guardian Internationally best-selling poet Christian Bök has spent more than ten years writing what promises to be the first example of "living poetry." After successfully demonstrating his concept in a colony of E. coli, Bök is on the verge of enciphering a beautiful, anomalous poem into the genome of an unkillable bacterium (Deinococcus radiodurans), which can, in turn, "read" his text, responding to it by manufacturing a viable, benign protein, whose sequence of amino acids enciphers yet another poem. The engineered organism might conceivably serve as a post-apocalyptic archive, capable of outlasting our civilization. Book I of The Xenotext constitutes a kind of "demonic grimoire," providing a scientific framework for the project with a series of poems, texts, and illustrations. A Virgilian welcome to the Inferno, Book I is the "orphic" volume in a diptych, addressing the pastoral heritage of poets, who have sought to supplant nature in both beauty and terror. The book sets the conceptual groundwork for the second volume, which will document the experiment itself. The Xenotext is experimental poetry in the truest sense of the term. Christian Bök is the author of Crystallography (1994) and Eunoia (2001), which won the Griffin Poetry Prize. He teaches at the University of Calgary in Alberta, Canada.
Categories: Poetry

absence of clutter

absence of clutter

The Xenotext project has now been underway for fifteen years , and may be the most laborious work of constrained writing since Georges Perec's La Vie mode d'emploi . The two central sonnets of The Xenotext , according to Bök , required ...

Author: Paul Stephens

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN: 9780262043670

Category: Art

Page: 288

View: 277

An exploration of minimal writing—texts generally shorter than a sentence—as complex, powerful literary and visual works. In the 1960s and 70s, minimal and conceptual artists stripped language down to its most basic components: the word and the letter. Barbara Kruger, Jenny Holzer, Carl Andre, Lawrence Weiner, and others built lucrative careers from text-based art. Meanwhile, poets and writers created works of minimal writing—visual texts generally shorter than a sentence. (One poem by Aram Saroyan reads in its entirety: eyeye.) In absence of clutter, Paul Stephens offers the first comprehensive account of minimal writing, arguing that it is equal in complexity and power to better-known, more commercial text-based art. Minimal writing, Stephens writes, can be beguilingly simple on the surface, but can also offer iterative reading experiences on multiple levels, from the fleeting to the ponderous. “absence of clutter,” for example, the entire text of a poem by Robert Grenier, is both expressive and self-descriptive. Stephens first sets out a theoretical framework for reading and viewing minimal writing and then offers close readings of works of minimal writing by Saroyan, Grenier, Norman Pritchard, Natalie Czech, and others. He “reverse engineers” recent works by Jen Bervin, Craig Dworkin, and Christian Bök that draw on molecular biology, and explores print-on-demand books by Holly Melgard, code poetry by Nick Montfort, Twitter-based work by Allison Parrish, and the use of Instagram by Hans-Ulrich Obrist and Saroyan. Text, it seems, is becoming ever more prevalent in visual art; meanwhile, poems are getting shorter. When reading has become scanning a screen and writing tapping out a text, absence of clutter invites us to reflect on how we read, see, and pay attention.
Categories: Art

Avenging Nature

Avenging Nature

The principal subject of analysis in this essay will be Christian Bök's The Xenotext, a project and book seeking to accomplish a form of genetic poetry.1 The Xenotext aims to manipulate the DNA of an extremophile bacterium called D.

Author: Eduardo Valls Oyarzun

Publisher: Lexington Books

ISBN: 9781793621450

Category: Nature

Page: 258

View: 300

“Nature, thou art my goddess”—Edmund’s bold assertion in King Lear could easily inspire and, at the same time, function as a lamentation of the inadequate respect of nature in culture. In this volume, international experts provide multidisciplinary exploration of the insubordinate representations of nature in modern and contemporary literature and art. The work foregrounds the need to reassess how nature is already, and has been for a while, striking back against human domination. From the perspective of literary studies, art, history, media studies, ethics and philosophy, and ethnology and anthropology, Avenging Nature highlights the need of assessing insurgent discourses that—converging with counter-discourses of race, gender or class—realize the empowerment of nature from its subaltern position. Acknowledging the argument that cultural representations of nature establish a relationship of domination and exploitation of human discourse over nonhuman reality and that, in consequence, our regard for nature as humanist critics is instrumental and anthropocentric, the present volume advocates for the view that the time has come to finally perceive nature’s vengeance and to critically probe into nature’s ongoing revenge against the exploitation of culture.
Categories: Nature

The Bloomsbury Handbook of Electronic Literature

The Bloomsbury Handbook of Electronic Literature

In this context, The Xenotext project by Canadian poet Christian Bök provides a compelling case through which to consider digital literary writing as it understands, engages, and inflects this post-digital phase.

Author: Joseph Tabbi

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781474230278

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 464

View: 473

A CHOICE Outstanding Academic Title 2018 The digital age has had a profound impact on literary culture, with new technologies opening up opportunities for new forms of literary art from hyperfiction to multi-media poetry and narrative-driven games. Bringing together leading scholars and artists from across the world, The Bloomsbury Handbook of Electronic Literature is the first authoritative reference handbook to the field. Crossing disciplinary boundaries, this book explores the foundational theories of the field, contemporary artistic practices, debates and controversies surrounding such key concepts as canonicity, world systems, narrative and the digital humanities, and historical developments and new media contexts of contemporary electronic literature. Including guides to major publications in the field, The Bloomsbury Handbook of Electronic Literature is an essential resource for scholars of contemporary culture in the digital era.
Categories: Literary Criticism

The Birth of Intertextuality

The Birth of Intertextuality

In 2011, Bök announced that 'The Xenotext works!'; and his poem, along with his description of its history and biochemical functioning, was published in 2015.12 Biologists have long relied on bibliographic and textual analogies to ...

Author: Scarlett Baron

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781135091910

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 382

View: 916

Why was the term ‘intertextuality’ coined? Why did its first theorists feel the need to replace or complement those terms – of quotation, allusion, echo, reference, influence, imitation, parody, pastiche, among others – which had previously seemed adequate and sufficient to the description of literary relations? Why, especially in view of the fact that it is still met with resistance, did the new concept achieve such popularity so fast? Why has it retained its currency in spite of its inherent paradoxes? Since 1966, when Kristeva defined every text as a ‘mosaic of quotations’, ‘intertextuality’ has become an all-pervasive catchword in literature and other humanities departments; yet the notion, as commonly used, remains nebulous to the point of meaninglessness. This book seeks to shed light on this thought-provoking but treacherously polyvalent concept by tracing the theory’s core ideas and emblematic images to paradigm shifts in the fields of science, philosophy, psychoanalysis, and linguistics, focusing on the shaping roles of Darwin, Nietzsche, Freud, Saussure, and Bakhtin. In so doing, it elucidates the meaning of one of the most frequently used terms in contemporary criticism, thereby providing a much-needed foundation for clearer discussions of literary relations across the discipline and beyond.
Categories: Literary Criticism

The Lyric in the Age of the Brain

The Lyric in the Age of the Brain

Christian Bök, “The Xenotext Experiment,” https://www.yumpu.com/en/document /view/6511784/abstracts-voice-and-vision-conference-university-of-manitoba/3. The final version of The Xenotext has yet to appear in print.

Author: Nikki Skillman

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674545120

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 342

View: 991

Science has transformed understandings of the mind, supplying physiological explanations for what once seemed transcendental. Nikki Skillman shows how lyric poets—caught between a reductive scientific view and naïve literary metaphors—struggled to articulate a vision of consciousness that was both scientifically informed and poetically truthful.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Postscript

Postscript

The Alien within Goes Viral: Christian Bök's Xenotext Christian Bök's Xenotext, were it to accomplish it aims, might well be the most sublime poem ever to emerge on this planet. I say to emerge, rather than to be created, ...

Author: Andrea Andersson

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN: 9781442649842

Category: Art and literature

Page: 416

View: 939

Postscript is the first collection of writings on the subject of conceptual writing by a diverse field of scholars in the realms of art, literature, media, as well as the artists themselves
Categories: Art and literature

Anthropocene Poetics

Anthropocene Poetics

The Xenotext not only promises to echo into the deep future but also works through a collaborative aesthetic in which literary and biochemical echoes shape its meaning. The Xenotext is a work of 'pataphysics, Alfred Jarry's “science of ...

Author: David Farrier

Publisher: U of Minnesota Press

ISBN: 9781452959535

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 176

View: 651

How poetry can help us think about and live in the Anthropocene by reframing our intimate relationship with geological time The Anthropocene describes how humanity has radically intruded into deep time, the vast timescales that shape the Earth system and all life-forms that it supports. The challenge it poses—how to live in our present moment alongside deep pasts and futures—brings into sharp focus the importance of grasping the nature of our intimate relationship with geological time. In Anthropocene Poetics, David Farrier shows how contemporary poetry by Elizabeth Bishop, Seamus Heaney, Evelyn Reilly, and Christian Bök, among others, provides us with frameworks for thinking about this uncanny sense of time. Looking at a diverse array of lyric and avant-garde poetry from three interrelated perspectives—the Anthropocene and the “material turn” in environmental philosophy; the Plantationocene and the role of global capitalism in environmental crisis; and the emergence of multispecies ethics and extinction studies—Farrier rethinks the environmental humanities from a literary critical perspective. Anthropocene Poetics puts a concern with deep time at the center, defining a new poetics for thinking through humanity’s role as geological agents, the devastation caused by resource extraction, and the looming extinction crisis.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Poetics of Liveliness

Poetics of Liveliness

12. Elizabeth Grosz, The Incorporeal: Ontology, Ethics and the Limits of Materialism, (New York: Columbia University Press, 2017), 4–5, 14, 13, 18. 13. Christian Bök, The Xenotext: Book 1 (Toronto: Coach House, 2015), 150. 14.

Author: Ada Smailbegović

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 9780231552561

Category: Literary Criticism

Page:

View: 980

Can poetry act as an aesthetic amplification device, akin to a microscope, through which we can sense minute or nearly imperceptible phenomena such as the folding of molecules into their three-dimensional shapes, the transformations that make up the life cycle of a silkworm, or the vaporous movements that constitute the ever-shifting edges of clouds? We tend to think of these subjects as reserved for science, but, as Ada Smailbegović argues, twentieth- and twenty-first-century writers have intermingled scientific methodologies with poetic form to reveal unfolding processes of change. Their works can be envisioned as laboratories within which the methodologies of experimentation, natural historical description, and taxonomic classification allow poetic language to register the rhythms and durations of material transformation. Poetics of Liveliness moves across scales to explore the realms of molecules, fibers, tissues, and clouds. It investigates works such as Christian Bök’s insertion of a poetic text into the DNA code of living bacteria in order to generate a new poem in the shape of a protein molecule, Jen Bervin’s considerations of silk fibers and their use in biomedicine, Gertrude Stein’s examination of brain tissues in medical school and its subsequent influence on her literary taxonomies of character, and Lisa Robertson’s studies of nineteenth-century meteorology and the soft architecture of clouds. In their attempt to understand physical processes unfolding within lively material worlds, Smailbegović contends, these poets have developed a distinctive materialist poetics. Structured as a poetic cosmology akin to Lucretius’s “On the Nature of Things,” which begins at the atomic level and expands out to the vastness of the universe, Poetics of Liveliness provides an innovative and surprising vision of the relationship between science and poetry.
Categories: Literary Criticism

The Oxford Handbook of Ecocriticism

The Oxford Handbook of Ecocriticism

Christian Bök, Eunoia (toronto: Coach house Books, 2001), 103. Cary Wolfe, What is Posthumanism? (Minneapolis and London: University of Minnesota Press, 2010), 165. Christian Bök, “The Xenotext Experiment,” SCRIPTed 5, no.2 (2008): 229.

Author: Greg Garrard

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199908196

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 600

View: 292

The Oxford Handbook of Ecocriticism provides a broad survey of the longstanding relationship between literature and the environment. The moment for such an offering is opportune in many respects: multiple environmental crises are increasingly inescapable at both transnational and local levels; the role of the humanities in addition to technology and politics is increasingly recognized as central for exploring and finding solutions; and the subject of ecocriticism has reached a kind of critical mass, both within its Anglo-American heartlands and beyond. From its origins in the study of American Nature Writing and British Romanticism, ecocriticism has developed along numerous theoretical, historical, cultural and geographical axes, the most contemporary and exciting of which will be represented in the Handbook. The contributors include eminent founders of the field, including Michael Branch and Richard Kerridge, a number of key 'second-wave' ecocritics, and the best up-and-coming scholars. Topics covered include: Renaissance anxieties about nature; the challenges of representing climate change; the racialization of the environment in the early 20th century; language and the concept of biosemiotics; and the possibilities for environmental humour.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Signifying Nothing

Signifying Nothing

The xenotext offers no redemption, no written promise of hidden treasure, no icon of value, no delivery of some precious, proto-signifying, specie. What was a past meaning, waiting intact and whole to be claimed, independent of the act ...

Author: B. Rotman

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9781349186891

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 111

View: 310

Categories: Literary Criticism

Parallel Encounters

Parallel Encounters

The aesthetics of the project are downplayed in favour of the Xenotext Experiment's potential to work out new directions in data storage for a variety of corporate and technological applications. On one occasion, they presented their ...

Author: Gillian Roberts

Publisher: Wilfrid Laurier Univ. Press

ISBN: 9781554589982

Category: Social Science

Page: 354

View: 476

The essays collected in iParallel Encounters The field of border studies has hitherto neglected the Canada–US border as a site of cultural interest, tending to examine only its role in transnational policy, economic cycles, and legal and political frameworks. Border studies has long been rooted in the US–Mexico divide; shifting the locus of that discussion north to the 49th parallel, the contributors ask what added complications a site-specific analysis of culture at the Canada–US border can bring to the conversation. In so doing, this collection responds to the demands of Hemispheric American Studies to broaden considerations of the significance of American culture to the Americas as a whole—bringing Canadian Studies into dialogue with the dominantly US-centric critical theory in questions of citizenship, globalization, Indigenous mobilization, hemispheric exchange, and transnationalism.
Categories: Social Science

Learning from Thoreau

Learning from Thoreau

The Xenotext: Book 1. Ontario, Canada: Coach House Books, 2015. —.“The Xenotext Experiment.” SCRIPTed 5, no. 2 (August 2008), 227–31. —. “The Xenotext Works.” Harriett (blog), Poetry Foundation, April 2nd, ...

Author: Andrew Menard

Publisher: University of Georgia Press

ISBN: 9780820353449

Category: Nature

Page: 192

View: 352

Learning from Thoreau is an intimate intellectual walk with America’s most edgy and original environmentalist. The thrust of the book consists not in learning “about” Thoreau from an intermediary but, as the title suggests, in learning “from” Thoreau along with the author—whose lifelong engagement with this “genius of the natural world” leads him to examine the process of learning from an admired model. Using both images and text, Andrew Menard offers a personal meditation on Thoreau’s thought, its originality, and its influence on the modern environmental movement. He places Thoreau in dialogue with contemporary artists and thinkers and associates him with a rich variety of places: Walden Pond, the Museum of Modern Art, the Rockefeller State Park Preserve in upstate New York, Mormon Mesa northeast of Las Vegas, and the old town of Königsberg, Prussia. Each place, each experience, each writer, and each work of art provides a different line of approach. The author also leads us through an expanding and deepening series of keywords that trigger fresh occasions to learn from Thoreau: Concord, Walden, walking, seeing, nature, wildness, beauty. The result is a deeply nuanced and informed portrait of Thoreau’s inner and outer landscape.
Categories: Nature

The Poetic Imperative

The Poetic Imperative

In Transcendental Heidegger, edited by Stephen Crowell and Jeff Malpas. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press. Bök, Christian. 2008. “The Xenotext Experiment.” SCRIPTed 5, no. 2 (August): 227– 31. –2011. “The Xenotext Works.

Author: Johanna Skibsrud

Publisher: McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP

ISBN: 9780228003069

Category: Literary Criticism

Page:

View: 142

This book aims to expand our sense of poetry's reach and potential impact. It is an effort at recouping the poetic imperative buried within the first taxonomic description of human being: "nosce te ipsum," or "know yourself." Johanna Skibsrud explores both poetry and human being not as fixed categories but as active processes of self-reflection and considers the way that human being is constantly activated within and through language and thinking. By examining a range of modern and contemporary poets including Wallace Stevens, M. NourbeSe Philip, and Anne Carson, all with an interest in playfully disrupting sense and logic and eliciting unexpected connections, The Poetic Imperative highlights the relationship between the practice of writing and reading and a broad tradition of speculative thought. It also seeks to demonstrate that the imperative "know yourself" functions not only as a command to speak and listen, but also as a call to action and feeling. The book argues that poetic modes of knowing - though central to poetry understood as a genre - are also at the root of any conscious effort to move beyond the subjective limits of language and selfhood in the hopes of touching upon the unknown. Engaging and erudite, The Poetic Imperative is an invitation to direct our attention simultaneously to the finite and embodied limits of selfhood, as well as to what those limits touch: the infinite, the Other, and truth itself.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Conceptualisms

Conceptualisms

The Xenotext Experiment” is a literary exercise that explores the aesthetic potential of genetics in the modern milieu — doing so in order to make literal the renowned aphorism of William S. Burroughs, who has declared that “the word ...

Author: Steve Tomasula

Publisher: University of Alabama Press

ISBN: 9780817360412

Category: Fiction

Page: 540

View: 676

"Anyone who looks beyond the bestseller lists can see that the literary landscape outside its commercial walls is just as varied as that of visual art, just as wild, just as conceptual: novels in the form of dioramas, narratives read through virtual-reality glasses, or told as a series of tweets, stories told as recipes, poems in skywriting, genetic code, pixels, skin-as well as print and sound. The 100+ prose works and poems that make up Conceptualisms all have the strangeness authors have always given ordinary speech in order to transform it into literature. In fact, this strangeness, or unfamiliarity, may be the very core of what makes writing literature, and pushed to its boundaries, what makes literature conceptual. Experimental, conceptual, avant-garde, hybrid, surfiction, fusion, radical, slip-stream, avant-pop, postmodern, self-conscious, innovative, L=A=N=G=U=A=G=E writing, alternative, anti- or new literature.... Across the years, a variety of names have been used to describe fiction, poetry and hybrid writing that, like conceptual visual art, foregrounds its ideas, explores new forms, challenges mainstream writing traditions, strives for ways to speak to the present. Along with whatever else they do, they ask, Why isn't this also literature?-and keep the boundaries of literature flexible and unresolved. Now, for the first time, here is an anthology that offers an overview of this other tradition as it lives in the early decades of the 21st century. The first major anthology of this other tradition, Conceptualisms presents writing by over 90 authors, across three generations, representing a plethora of aesthetics and approaches to their subjects. Readers will recognize authors who have shaped the nature of contemporary writing, such Lydia Davis, Charles Bernstein, Nathaniel Mackey, David Foster Wallace, and Claudia Rankine. They'll also find authors, and responses to the canon, that they haven't yet encountered. Conceptualisms is a book of ideas for writers, teachers and scholars, as well as readers who wonder how many ways literature can live"--
Categories: Fiction

Plain Text

Plain Text

The Xenotext Works.” Harriet: The Blog, 2011. web.archive.org/save/_embed/https://www.poetryfoundation.org/harriet/2011/04/the-xenotext-works/ (accessed December 26, 2016). . The Xenotext: Book I. Toronto: Coach House, 2015.

Author: Dennis Tenen

Publisher: Stanford University Press

ISBN: 9781503602342

Category: Social Science

Page: 280

View: 320

This book challenges the ways we read, write, store, and retrieve information in the digital age. Computers—from electronic books to smart phones—play an active role in our social lives. Our technological choices thus entail theoretical and political commitments. Dennis Tenen takes up today's strange enmeshing of humans, texts, and machines to argue that our most ingrained intuitions about texts are profoundly alienated from the physical contexts of their intellectual production. Drawing on a range of primary sources from both literary theory and software engineering, he makes a case for a more transparent practice of human–computer interaction. Plain Text is thus a rallying call, a frame of mind as much as a file format. It reminds us, ultimately, that our devices also encode specific modes of governance and control that must remain available to interpretation.
Categories: Social Science

The Routledge Companion to the Environmental Humanities

The Routledge Companion to the Environmental Humanities

Christian Bök Editorial note: “Phage φX174” and “The Dire Seed” are excerpts from The Xenotext, an ongoing project by the poet Christian Bök. For the last fifteen years, Bök has been working with geneticists to engineer an extremophile ...

Author: Ursula K. Heise

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 9781317660194

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 490

View: 345

The Routledge Companion to the Environmental Humanities provides a comprehensive, transnational, and interdisciplinary map to the field, offering a broad overview of its founding principles while providing insight into exciting new directions for future scholarship. Articulating the significance of humanistic perspectives for our collective social engagement with ecological crises, the volume explores the potential of the environmental humanities for organizing humanistic research, opening up new forms of interdisciplinarity, and shaping public debate and policies on environmental issues. Sections cover: The Anthropocene and the Domestication of Earth Posthumanism and Multispecies Communities Inequality and Environmental Justice Decline and Resilience: Environmental Narratives, History, and Memory Environmental Arts, Media, and Technologies The State of the Environmental Humanities The first of its kind, this companion covers essential issues and themes, necessarily crossing disciplines within the humanities and with the social and natural sciences. Exploring how the environmental humanities contribute to policy and action concerning some of the key intellectual, social, and environmental challenges of our times, the chapters offer an ideal guide to this rapidly developing field.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Word Toys

Word Toys

The Xenotext Works.” Harriet, a poetry blog. Web. <https://www.poetryfoun dation.org/harriet/2011/04/the-xenotext-works/>. Bram, Shachar, and Batya Stein. Charles Olson and Alfred North Whitehead: An Essay on Poetry.

Author: Brian Kim Stefans

Publisher: University of Alabama Press

ISBN: 9780817358952

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 364

View: 991

Word Toys: Poetry and Technics is an engaging and thought provoking volume that speculates on a range of textual works—poetic, novelistic, and programmed—as technical objects. With the ascent of digital culture, new forms of literature and literary production are thriving that include multimedia, networked, conceptual, and other as-yet-unnamed genres while traditional genres and media—the lyric, the novel, the book—have been transformed. Word Toys: Poetry and Technics is an engaging and thought-provoking volume that speculates on a range of poetic, novelistic, and programmed works that lie beyond the language of the literary and which views them instead as technical objects. Brian Kim Stefans considers the problems that arise when discussing these progressive texts in relation to more traditional print-based poetic texts. He questions the influence of game theory and digital humanities rhetoric on poetic production, and how non-digital works, such as contemporary works of lyric poetry, are influenced by the recent ubiquity of social media, the power of search engines, and the public perceptions of language in a time of nearly universal surveillance. Word Toys offers new readings of canonical avant-garde writers such as Ezra Pound and Charles Olson, major successors such as Charles Bernstein, Alice Notley, and Wanda Coleman, mixed-genre artists including Caroline Bergvall, Tan Lin, and William Poundstone, and lyric poets such as Harryette Mullen and Ben Lerner. Writers that trouble the poetry/science divide such as Christian Bök, and novelists who have embraced digital technology such as Mark Z. Danielewski and the elusive Toadex Hobogrammathon, anchor reflections on the nature of creativity in a world where authors collaborate, even if unwittingly, with machines and networks. In addition, Stefans names provocative new genres—among them the nearly formless “undigest” and the transpacific “miscegenated script”—arguing by example that interdisciplinary discourse is crucial to the development of scholarship about experimental work.
Categories: Literary Criticism

A Bibliography of Conceptual Writing

A Bibliography of Conceptual Writing

The Xenotext Experiment. 10 pages. /ubu editions (Publishing the Unpublishable). Bök, Christian (2009). Two Dots over a Vowel. Calgary: No press. Bök, Christian (2015-10-20). The Xenotext: Book 1. 160 pages. Toronto: Coach House Books.

Author: yigru zeltil

Publisher: Lulu.com

ISBN: 9781365725517

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