The Unquiet Nisei

The Unquiet Nisei

The book traces Embrey's life from her youth in the Little Tokyo section of Los Angeles, to her harrowing experiences in the Japanese internment camps, to her many decades of passionate advocacy on behalf of her fellow internees.

Author: D. Bahr

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9780230609990

Category: History

Page: 193

View: 904

An oral-history-based biography of a seminal Asian-American activist. The book traces Embrey's life from her youth in the Little Tokyo section of Los Angeles, to her harrowing experiences in the Japanese internment camps, to her many decades of passionate advocacy on behalf of her fellow internees.
Categories: History

The Unquiet Nisei

The Unquiet Nisei

The book traces Embrey's life from her youth in the Little Tokyo section of Los Angeles, to her harrowing experiences in the Japanese internment camps, to her many decades of passionate advocacy on behalf of her fellow internees.

Author: Diana Meyers Bahr

Publisher: Macmillan

ISBN: 0230600670

Category: History

Page: 192

View: 269

An oral-history-based biography of a seminal Asian-American activist. The book traces Embrey's life from her youth in the Little Tokyo section of Los Angeles, to her harrowing experiences in the Japanese internment camps, to her many decades of passionate advocacy on behalf of her fellow internees.
Categories: History

Nisei Radicals

Nisei Radicals

The Unquiet Nisei: An Oral History of the Life of Sue Kunitomi Embrey. New York:
Palgrave Macmillan, 2007. Fujino, Diane C. “Cold War Activism and Japanese
American Exceptionalism: Contested Solidarities and Decolonial Alternatives to ...

Author: Diane C. Fujino

Publisher: University of Washington Press

ISBN: 9780295748276

Category: Social Science

Page: 272

View: 454

Demanding liberation, advocating for the oppressed, and organizing for justice, siblings Mitsuye Yamada (1923–) and Michael Yasutake (1920–2001) rebelled against respectability and assimilation, charting their own paths for what it means to be Nisei. Raised in Seattle and then forcibly removed and detained in the Minidoka concentration camp, their early lives mirrored those of many second-generation Japanese Americans. Yasutake’s pacifism endured even with immense pressure to enlist during his confinement and in the years following World War II. His faith-based activism guided him in condemning imperialism and inequality, and he worked tirelessly to free political prisoners and defend human rights. Yamada became an internationally acclaimed feminist poet, professor, and activist who continues to speak out against racism and patriarchy. Weaving together the stories of two distinct but intrinsically connected political lives, Nisei Radicals examines the siblings’ half century of dedication to global movements, including multicultural feminism, Puerto Rican independence, Japanese American redress, Indigenous sovereignty, and more. From displacement and invisibility to insurgent mobilization, Yamada and Yasutake rejected stereotypes and fought to dismantle systems of injustice.
Categories: Social Science

The Color of Success

The Color of Success

Robert M. Cullum, “Japanese American Audit—1948,” Common Ground (Winter
1949): 87–89; Robinson, After Camp, ... December, 12, 1997, 1, 3, 4; Greg
Robinson, After Camp, 191; Diana Meyers Bahr, The Unquiet Nisei: An Oral
History of ...

Author: Ellen D. Wu

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9781400848874

Category: History

Page: 376

View: 831

The Color of Success tells of the astonishing transformation of Asians in the United States from the "yellow peril" to "model minorities"--peoples distinct from the white majority but lauded as well-assimilated, upwardly mobile, and exemplars of traditional family values--in the middle decades of the twentieth century. As Ellen Wu shows, liberals argued for the acceptance of these immigrant communities into the national fold, charging that the failure of America to live in accordance with its democratic ideals endangered the country's aspirations to world leadership. Weaving together myriad perspectives, Wu provides an unprecedented view of racial reform and the contradictions of national belonging in the civil rights era. She highlights the contests for power and authority within Japanese and Chinese America alongside the designs of those external to these populations, including government officials, social scientists, journalists, and others. And she demonstrates that the invention of the model minority took place in multiple arenas, such as battles over zoot suiters leaving wartime internment camps, the juvenile delinquency panic of the 1950s, Hawaii statehood, and the African American freedom movement. Together, these illuminate the impact of foreign relations on the domestic racial order and how the nation accepted Asians as legitimate citizens while continuing to perceive them as indelible outsiders. By charting the emergence of the model minority stereotype, The Color of Success reveals that this far-reaching, politically charged process continues to have profound implications for how Americans understand race, opportunity, and nationhood.
Categories: History

City Girls

City Girls

Interview in REgenerations Oral History Project: Rebuilding Japanese American
Families, Communities, and Civil Rights in the Resettlement Era, ... Bahr, Diana
Meyers, The Unquiet Nisei: An Oral History of the Life of Sue Kunitomi Embrey.

Author: Valerie J. Matsumoto

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780190655204

Category:

Page: 312

View: 861

Even before wartime incarceration, Japanese Americans largely lived in separate cultural communities from their West Coast neighbors. Although the Nisei children, the American-born second generation, were U.S. citizens and were integrated in public schools, they were socially isolated in many ways from their peers. These young women found rapport in ethnocultural youth organizations, a forgotten world of female friendship and camaraderie that Valerie J. Matsumoto recovers in this book. Through extensive networks of social clubs, young Japanese American women competed in sports, socialized with young men, and forged enduring friendships. During the 1920s and 1930s, Nisei girls' organizations flourished in Los Angeles, then home to the largest Japanese American population. In clubs with names such as the Junior Misses and Tartanettes, girls gained leadership training, took part in community service, found jobs, and enjoyed beach outings and parties. Often sponsored by the YWCA, Buddhist temples, and Christian churches, these groups served as a bulwark against racial discrimination, offering a welcoming space that helped young women navigate between parental expectations and the lure of popular culture. Indeed, their dances, meetings, and athletic events filled the social calendars in the ethnic press. As cultural mediators and ethnic representatives, these urban teenagers bridged the cultures of the Japanese American community and mainstream society, whether introducing new foods, holidays, and rituals into the home or dancing in kimono at civic events. Some expressed themselves as poets, writers, and journalists and took leading roles in the development of a Nisei literary network. Women's organizing skills and work would prove critical to the support of their families during World War II incarceration and community rebuilding in the difficult years of resettlement. By bringing to life a dynamic and long-lasting world of friendship circles and clubs, City Girls highlights the ways in which urban Nisei daughters claimed modern femininity, an American identity, and public space from the Jazz Age through the postwar era.
Categories:

Encyclopedia of Asian American Folklore and Folklife

Encyclopedia of Asian American Folklore and Folklife

The Unquiet Nisei: An Oral History of the Life of Sue Kunitomi Embrey. Palgrave
Studies in Oral History. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2007. Daniels, Roger. “
Words Do Matter: A Note on Inappropriate Terminology and the Incarceration of ...

Author: Jonathan H. X. Lee

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 9780313350665

Category: Social Science

Page: 1254

View: 730

This comprehensive compilation of entries documents the origins, transmissions, and transformations of Asian American folklore and folklife. * More than 600 entries * Contributions from more than 170 expert contributors * Introductory essays covering disciplinary theories and methods in the study of folklore and folklife * An appendix of Asian American folktales
Categories: Social Science

Overcoming Katrina

Overcoming Katrina

... The University of Nevada in the Wake of Kent State , by Brad E . Lucas ( 2006 )
The Unquiet Nisei : An Oral History of the Life of Sue Kunitomi Embrey , by Diana
Meyers Bahr ( 2007 ) Sisters in the Brotherhoods : Working Women Organizing ...

Author: D'Ann R. Penner

Publisher: Palgrave Studies in Oral Histo

ISBN: STANFORD:36105132252375

Category: History

Page: 248

View: 914

stores, the Baptist churches, the community health clinics, and those streets where the aunties stood on the corner, and whose physical traces have now all been washed away. They conclude with visions of a safer, equitably rebuilt New Orleans." --Book Jacket.
Categories: History

Saturday Review

Saturday Review

JOYCE CAROL OATES , Windsor , Ont . The Unquiet Nisei An Absolute
Commitment JEROME CHARYN'S REVIEW of Bill Hosokawa's Nisei : The Quiet
Americans ( SR , Nov. 15 ) does not mention the controversy which has been ,
and is still ...

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN: MINN:31951001915494W

Category: American literature

Page:

View: 262

Categories: American literature

Edward Lansdale the Unquiet American

Edward Lansdale  the Unquiet American

He selected three men to accompany him : James Clark , an agent of the Army ' s
Counter Intelligence Corps ( CIC ) ; Technician Fifth Class David Greene , a
photographer ; and Technician Fourth Class Matsue Yagawa , a Nisei interpreter
.

Author: Cecil B. Currey

Publisher: Potomac Books Incorporated

ISBN: UCSC:32106019464640

Category: Generals

Page: 430

View: 900

The Village Voice called the complex life of U.S. Air Force major general and CIA agent Edward G. Lansdale one of "Technicolor fascination". The maverick military thinker's brilliant counterinsurgency tactics preserved democracy in the Philippines, but his subsequent efforts to create "a broad-based, open society" in Vietnam failed following his return to the United States in 1956. Lansdale later led an undercover organization dedicated to bringing down Fidel Castro. This important biography of the legendary intelligence operative and master of political and psychological warfare is now available as a Brassey's Five-Star Paperback.
Categories: Generals

Viola Martinez California Paiute

Viola Martinez  California Paiute

The life story of Viola Martinez, an Owens Valley Paiute Indian of eastern California, extends over nine decades of the twentieth century.

Author: Diana Meyers Bahr

Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press

ISBN: 9780806179599

Category: Social Science

Page: 214

View: 863

The life story of Viola Martinez, an Owens Valley Paiute Indian of eastern California, extends over nine decades of the twentieth century. Viola experienced forced assimilation in an Indian boarding school, overcame racial stereotypes to pursue a college degree, and spent several years working at a Japanese American internment camp during World War II. Finding herself poised uncertainly between Indian and white worlds, Viola was determined to turn her marginalized existence into an opportunity for personal empowerment. In Viola Martinez, California Paiute, Diana Meyers Bahr recounts Viola’s extraordinary life story and examines her strategies for dealing with acculturation. Bahr allows Viola to tell her story in her own words, beginning with her early years in Owens Valley, where she learned traditional lifeways, such as gathering piñons, from her aunt. In the summers, she traveled by horse and buggy into the High Sierras where her aunt traded with Basque sheepherders. Viola was sent to the Sherman Institute, a federal boarding school with a mandate to assimilate American Indians into U.S. mainstream culture. Punished for speaking Paiute at the boarding school, Viola and her cousin climbed fifty-foot palm trees to speak their native language secretly. Realizing that, despite her efforts, she was losing her language, Viola resolved not just to learn English but to master it. She earned a degree from Santa Barbara State College and pursued a career as social worker. During World War II, Viola worked as an employment counselor for Japanese American internees at the Manzanar War Relocation Authority camp. Later in life, she became a teacher and worked tirelessly as a founding member of the Los Angeles American Indian Education Commission.
Categories: Social Science

Program of the Annual Meeting

Program of the     Annual Meeting

THE UNQUIET NISEI An Oral History of the Life of Sue Kunitomi Embrey Diana
Meyers Bahr Palgrave Studies in Oral History 208 pp . / 0-230-60067-0 / $ 69.95
hc . THE HISTORY OF LATIN AMERICA Collision of Cultures Marshall C. Eakin ...

Author: Organization of American Historians. Meeting

Publisher:

ISBN: UCSC:32106020343213

Category: Historians

Page:

View: 367

Categories: Historians

OAH Annual Meeting

OAH Annual Meeting

THE UNQUIET NISEI An Oral History of the Life of Sue Kunitomi Embrey Diana
Meyers Bahr Palgrave Studies in Oral History 208 pp . 70 - 230 - 60067 - 0 / $ 69
. 95 hc . THE HISTORY OF LATIN AMERICA Collision of Cultures Marshall C ...

Author: Organization of American Historians. Meeting

Publisher:

ISBN: IND:30000116759956

Category: Historians

Page:

View: 874

Categories: Historians

The Students of Sherman Indian School

The Students of Sherman Indian School

This book offers the first full history of Sherman Indian School’s 100-plus years, a history that reflects federal Indian education policy since the late nineteenth century.

Author: Diana Meyers Bahr

Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press

ISBN: 9780806145136

Category: History

Page: 192

View: 801

Sherman Indian High School, as it is known today, began in 1892 as Perris Indian School on eighty acres south of Riverside, California, with nine students. Its mission, like that of other off-reservation Indian boarding schools, was to "civilize" Indian children, which meant stripping them of their Native culture and giving them vocational training. Today, the school on Magnolia Avenue in Riverside serves 350 students from 68 tribes, and its curricula are designed to both preserve Native languages and traditions and prepare students for life and work in mainstream American society. This book offers the first full history of Sherman Indian School’s 100-plus years, a history that reflects federal Indian education policy since the late nineteenth century. Sherman Institute's historical trajectory features the abuse and exploitation familiar from other accounts of life at Indian boarding schools—children punished and humiliated for maintaining Native ways and put to work as manual laborers. But this book also brings to light the ways Native children managed to maintain their dignity, benefited from interacting with students from other tribes, and often even expressed appreciation for the experiences at Sherman. Alternating periods of assimilation and self-determination form a critical part of the story Diana Meyers Bahr tells, but her interpretation of the students’ complex experiences is more subtle than that. From the accounts of students, educators, and administrators over the years, Bahr draws a picture of Sherman students successfully navigating a complicated middle course between total assimilation and total rejection of white education. The ambivalence of such a middle way has meant confronting painful moral choices—and ultimately it has deepened students’ appreciation for the diverse cultures of Indian America and heightened their awareness of their own tribal identity. The ramifications can be seen in today's Sherman Indian High School, a repository of the living history so deftly and thoroughly chronicled here.
Categories: History

A Matter of Conscience

A Matter of Conscience

Yoda ' s fine 1999 senior thesis at Stanford University , “ The Unquiet American :
A Portrait of the Life of James M . Omura , American Champion of Civil Rights , ”
represents the first comprehensive biographical study of the controversial Nisei ...

Author: Mike Mackey

Publisher:

ISBN: STANFORD:36105113090588

Category: Concentration camps

Page: 185

View: 987

This book is a collection of essays that look at various aspects of the heart mountain draft resistance movement during world war II.
Categories: Concentration camps

Bibliographic Index

Bibliographic Index

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN: UOM:39015079882158

Category: Bibliographical literature

Page:

View: 482

Categories: Bibliographical literature

Pacific Northwest Quarterly

Pacific Northwest Quarterly

49 Lubove, Struggle for Social Security, by Paul K. Conkin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
Kitagawa, Issei and Nisei, by S. Frank Miyamoto . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 Johnston
, Legions of Babel: Weintraub, The Last Great Cause, by Hugh T. Lovin .

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN: UVA:X004965410

Category: Northwest, Pacific

Page:

View: 384

Categories: Northwest, Pacific

Arts Humanities Citation Index

Arts   Humanities Citation Index

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN: UOM:39015064551305

Category: Arts

Page:

View: 626

A multidisciplinary index covering the journal literature of the arts and humanities. It fully covers 1,144 of the world's leading arts and humanities journals, and it indexes individually selected, relevant items from over 6,800 major science and social science journals.
Categories: Arts

Ultimate Arabic

Ultimate Arabic

Set A (4 discs) -- Set B. Disc 1. Egyptian Arabic. Disc 2. Iraqi Arabic. Disc 3. Lebanese Arabic. Disc 4. Saudi Arabic.

Author: Zvjezdana Vrzić

Publisher:

ISBN: 9781400020812

Category: Foreign Language Study

Page: 536

View: 786

Set A (4 discs) -- Set B. Disc 1. Egyptian Arabic. Disc 2. Iraqi Arabic. Disc 3. Lebanese Arabic. Disc 4. Saudi Arabic.
Categories: Foreign Language Study