The Tyranny of Metrics

The Tyranny of Metrics

This book addresses a major problem."--George A. Akerlof, Nobel Prize-winning economist "The Tyranny of Metrics is an important and accessible book about a growing problem.

Author: Jerry Z. Muller

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9780691191911

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 248

View: 311

Today, organizations of all kinds are ruled by the belief that the path to success is quantifying human performance, publicizing the results, and dividing up the rewards based on the numbers. But in our zeal to instill the evaluation process with scientific rigor, we've gone from measuring performance to fixating on measuring itself. The result is a tyranny of metrics that threatens the quality of our lives and most important institutions. In this timely and powerful book, Jerry Muller uncovers the damage our obsession with metrics is causing--and shows how we can begin to fix the problem. Filled with examples from education, medicine, business and finance, government, the police and military, and philanthropy and foreign aid, this brief and accessible book explains why the seemingly irresistible pressure to quantify performance distorts and distracts, whether by encouraging "gaming the stats" or "teaching to the test." That's because what can and does get measured is not always worth measuring, may not be what we really want to know, and may draw effort away from the things we care about. Along the way, we learn why paying for measured performance doesn't work, why surgical scorecards may increase deaths, and much more. But metrics can be good when used as a complement to--rather than a replacement for--judgment based on personal experience, and Muller also gives examples of when metrics have been beneficial. Complete with a checklist of when and how to use metrics, The Tyranny of Metrics is an essential corrective to a rarely questioned trend that increasingly affects us all.
Categories: Business & Economics

Minds Wide Shut

Minds Wide Shut

Jerry Z. Muller's delightful study The Tyranny of Metrics makes Postman seem all the more prescient.22 Muller examines the cultural paradigm “engulfing an ever- widening range of institutions,” which he calls a “metric fixation.

Author: Gary Saul Morson

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9780691214917

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 336

View: 225

"Gary Saul Morson, a literature scholar at Northwestern, and Morton Schapiro, an economist, and president of Northwestern, are authors of our book Cents and Sensibilities, on what economists, who tend to reduce reality to economic fundamentalist thinking, can do to correct and enhance their accounts of social life. In their new book, Morton and Schapiro extend their discussion to encompass not only the market fundamentalism of economics, but various other forms of intellectual fundamentalism from politics through religion through literature. In each case and overall, they emphasize the importance of cross-disciplinary dialogue in correcting the errors of these diferent academics fundamentalisms, while helping to construct richer accounts of culture and society"--
Categories: Business & Economics

The Product Diploma

The Product Diploma

Understand how to contextualize data, and know when to go against the data (because data is imperfect) There are entire books written about metrics and analytics (two we recommend are Lean Analytics and The Tyranny of Metrics).

Author: Davis Treybig

Publisher: Davis Treybig

ISBN: 9781728740911

Category: Computers

Page: 223

View: 792

The complete guide on landing a job as an Associate Product Manager (APM). Two former Google APMs share everything they wish they knew when they were applying for product roles out of college. See a breakdown of what it's like to be a product manager and what a day in the life looks like. Learn how to prepare for APM roles while in college, from what classes to take to what extracurriculars to pursue. Finally, read about how to master the APM interview, from high level strategies to sample interview questions. In 2002, the product executive at Google and future Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer made a big bet. It was the kind of big bet that Google has become known for, but this wasn’t a bet on self-driving cars or a game-changing app. In fact, the bet wasn’t about a product at all - it was about product managers. Back in the early 2000’s product managers were in short supply, or at least the kind that Google was looking for. Google wanted product managers who were deeply technical; people who not only knew how to write code, but who fundamentally understood technology. They also wanted product managers who were hungry and could execute on the smallest details, but who could also think strategically. They weren’t finding what they were looking for in the existing pool of product managers. So Mayer pitched a radical idea: what if Google hired entrepreneurial and talented computer science majors straight out of college and taught them to be product leaders? Google would create a small, close-knit community which could learn the role together as they rotated through different teams in the company. Those in the program would be transformed into the type of product leaders Google wanted - people who could speak in both business and technical terms and who could take products all the way from a high-level idea to a launch. The job would be called Associate Product Manager, or ‘APM’ for short. Fast-forward fifteen years and the Google APM program has become one of Mayer’s most indelible contributions to the search giant. The first class of Google APMs was just 6 people, but today there are over 40 APMs in each class. Google APMs have gone on to become Google VPs, C-level execs of tech giants like Facebook and Asana, and founders of numerous successful startups such as Optimizely. Mayer’s program was such a success that it has been adopted by almost every other tech giant as well as many successful startups. Today, companies like Facebook, Uber, Dropbox, Workday, and LinkedIn all hire product managers out of college into “APM”-like programs. Although there are some subtle differences between each program - Facebook RPMs (rotational product managers) have 6-month rotations versus Google’s year-long rotations, and Microsoft has hundreds of new grad product managers each year - they all have the same foundational goal of finding and developing the product leaders of tomorrow. Today, the product manager role has become one of the most coveted and prestigious jobs for ambitious college students, but it is also one of the most competitive and misunderstood. Perhaps you picked up this book because you heard about the product manager role, and want to understand more about what it is and whether it is right for you. Or, perhaps you heard about how rigorous and intimidating the application and interview processes can be, and you want to get a leg up. We faced those same questions and felt the same way, and that’s why we decided to write this book. Before we became Google APMs we were frantically googling: “Should I be a software engineer or PM out of school?”, “What do companies look for in new grad PMs?”, “How do I prepare for the interviews”, and “What does a PM do exactly?”. At the time, we didn’t find great answers and still there aren’t many answers out there today. This book gives you the answers we were looking for; we’ve synthesized everything we learned through the job search, application, and interview process along with everything we’ve learned on the job. We discuss what it means to be a product manager and why you could be a good (or bad) fit for the role. We talk about what to do during college, across classes, extracurriculars, and internships, to develop the skills that will help you excel as a PM. Finally, we teach you how to land and then nail a product management interview. For each topic we cover, we’ve also asked our peers - new grad PMs from Google, Facebook, and more - to reveal their secrets as well.
Categories: Computers

The New Metrics

The New Metrics

The tyranny of metrics. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press. Nowakowska, M. (1990). Cluster analysis, graphs, and branching processes as new methodologies for intelligent systems on example of bibliometric and social network data.

Author: Elaine M. Lasda

Publisher: Emerald Group Publishing

ISBN: 9781789732696

Category: Reference

Page: 160

View: 910

New methods in bibliometrics and alternative metrics provide us with information about research impact at both increasingly granular and global levels. Here, editor Elaine Lasda and a cast of expert contributors present a variety of case studies that demonstrate the practical utilization of these new scholarly metrics.
Categories: Reference

The Tyranny of Metrics

The Tyranny of Metrics

This book addresses a major problem."--George A. Akerlof, Nobel Prize-winning economist "The Tyranny of Metrics is an important and accessible book about a growing problem.

Author: Jerry Z Muller

Publisher:

ISBN: 0691201226

Category:

Page: 248

View: 177

How the obsession with quantifying human performance threatens business, medicine, education, government--and the quality of our lives Today, organizations of all kinds are ruled by the belief that the path to success is quantifying human performance, publicizing the results, and dividing up the rewards based on the numbers. But in our zeal to instill the evaluation process with scientific rigor, we've gone from measuring performance to fixating on measuring itself--and this tyranny of metrics now threatens the quality of our organizations and lives. In this brief, accessible, and powerful book, Jerry Muller uncovers the damage metrics are causing and shows how we can begin to fix the problem. Filled with examples from business, medicine, education, government, and other fields, the book explains why paying for measured performance doesn't work, why surgical scorecards may increase deaths, and much more. But Muller also shows that, when used as a complement to judgment based on personal experience, metrics can be beneficial, and he includes an invaluable checklist of when and how to use them. The result is an essential corrective to a harmful trend that increasingly affects us all.
Categories:

Metrics at Work

Metrics at Work

This distinction between algorithms on the one hand and metrics and analytics on the other hand echoes the one developed by Karin Knorr-Cetina between algorithms and what she analyzes as “scopic systems.” See Knorr-Cetina, Karin, 2003, ...

Author: Angèle Christin

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9780691175232

Category: Computers

Page: 272

View: 611

From Circulation Numbers to Web Analytics: Journalists and their Readers in the United States and France -- Utopian Beginnings: A Tale of Two Websites -- Entering the Chase for Clicks: Transatlantic Convergences -- The Multiple Meanings of Clicks: Journalists and Algorithmic Publics -- The Fast and the Slow: Producing Online News in Real Time -- Between Exposure and Unpaid Work: Compensation and Freelance Careers in Online News -- Conclusion.
Categories: Computers

Identity Ignorance Innovation

Identity  Ignorance  Innovation

See also https://towardsdatascience.com/on-the-tyranny-of-metrics-and-metric-fixation-b4c1d44b5f6c See also ed. R.H. Super, Matthew Arnold, Democratic Education (1962), pp212–43 12 Quoted in Muller, op. cit. pp32–3 13 On this cultural ...

Author: Matthew d'Ancona

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN: 9781529303964

Category: Political Science

Page: 288

View: 653

'D'Ancona makes his case well... The book is well written and thoughtful' -- The Times 'A heartfelt attempt to renew liberal ideals for the coming decades... How sorely our public debate needs others to express themselves similarly.' -- Henry Mance, Financial Times 'An urgent and exhilarating account of how populism, prejudice & polarisation have corrupted objective truth and public discourse. D'Ancona's sparkling prose provides an explanation of how we got here and, crucially, how we might get out.' -- James O'Brien 'A book so rich in thought, wisdom and persuasion I find myself sharing the ideas within it with everyone I meet... In the much-mourned absence of Christopher Hitchens, d'Ancona is fast becoming the voice of enlightenment for our bewildered age.' -- Emily Maitlis 'A tonic for our times that blows open any complacency following Trump's defeat that the demise of populism and nativism is inevitable. In beautifully written prose, D'Ancona puts forward hopeful ideas and timely inspiration for a progressive politics to replace it.' -- David Lammy 'A brilliant, lucid, fearless tract, just what the historical moment ordered.' -- Andrew O'Hagan 'D'Ancona's regular practical suggestions help to take it beyond mere theory and into the real world... Decision-makers would do well to read it.' -- Charlotte Henry, TLS *** This is a call to arms. The old tools of political analysis are obsolete - they have rusted and are no longer fit for purpose. We've grown lazy, wedded to the assumption that, after ruptures such as Brexit, the pandemic, and the rise of the populist Right, things will eventually go 'back to normal'. Award-winning political writer Matthew d'Ancona invites you to think afresh: to seek new ways of challenging political extremism, bombastic populism and democratic torpor on both Left and Right. In this ground-breaking book, he proposes a new way of understanding our era and plots a way forward. With rigorous analysis, he argues that we need to understand the world in a new way, with a framework built from the three I's: Identity, Ignorance and Innovation.
Categories: Political Science

Analytics Stories

Analytics Stories

You would think that after a metric becomes an important component of hospital ratings, hospitals would improve on that metric. Wrong again! Again, as pointed out in The Tyranny of Metrics (pages 115–116), since Medicare began reporting ...

Author: Wayne L. Winston

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 9781119646051

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 528

View: 171

Inform your own analyses by seeing how one of the best data analysts in the world approaches analytics problems Analytics Stories: How to Make Good Things Happen is a thoughtful, incisive, and entertaining exploration of the application of analytics to real-world problems and situations. Covering fields as diverse as sports, finance, politics, healthcare, and business, Analytics Stories bridges the gap between the oft inscrutable world of data analytics and the concrete problems it solves. Distinguished professor and author Wayne L. Winston answers questions like: Was Liverpool over Barcelona the greatest upset in sports history? Was Derek Jeter a great infielder What's wrong with the NFL QB rating? How did Madoff keep his fund going? Does a mutual fund’s past performance predict future performance? What caused the Crash of 2008? Can we predict where crimes are likely to occur? Is the lot of the American worker improving? How can analytics save the US Republic? The birth of evidence-based medicine: How did James Lind know citrus fruits cured scurvy? How can I objectively compare hospitals? How can we predict heart attacks in real time? How does a retail store know if you're pregnant? How can I use A/B testing to improve sales from my website? How can analytics help me write a hit song? Perfect for anyone with the word “analyst” in their job title, Analytics Stories illuminates the process of applying analytic principles to practical problems and highlights the potential pitfalls that await careless analysts.
Categories: Business & Economics

The Matter of Facts

The Matter of Facts

12 The Tyranny of Metrics Despite its inadequacies, journal impact factor became a proxy for research quality, a metric commonly used by institutes, research groups, and grant and promotion committees to assess research and even ...

Author: Gareth Leng

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN: 9780262358286

Category: Science

Page: 376

View: 842

How biases, the desire for a good narrative, reliance on citation metrics, and other problems undermine confidence in modern science. Modern science is built on experimental evidence, yet scientists are often very selective in deciding what evidence to use and tend to disagree about how to interpret it. In The Matter of Facts, Gareth and Rhodri Leng explore how scientists produce and use evidence. They do so to contextualize an array of problems confronting modern science that have raised concerns about its reliability: the widespread use of inappropriate statistical tests, a shortage of replication studies, and a bias in both publishing and citing “positive” results. Before these problems can be addressed meaningfully, the authors argue, we must understand what makes science work and what leads it astray. The myth of science is that scientists constantly challenge their own thinking. But in reality, all scientists are in the business of persuading other scientists of the importance of their own ideas, and they do so by combining reason with rhetoric. Often, they look for evidence that will support their ideas, not for evidence that might contradict them; often, they present evidence in a way that makes it appear to be supportive; and often, they ignore inconvenient evidence. In a series of essays focusing on controversies, disputes, and discoveries, the authors vividly portray science as a human activity, driven by passion as well as by reason. By analyzing the fluidity of scientific concepts and the dynamic and unpredictable development of scientific fields, the authors paint a picture of modern science and the pressures it faces.
Categories: Science

Against Free Speech

Against Free Speech

Jerry Z. Muller, “The Tyranny of Metrics: The Quest to Quantify Everything Undermines Higher Education”, Chronicle of Higher Education, January 21, 2018, https://www.chronicle.com/article/The-Tyranny-of-Metrics/242269. 61.

Author: Anthony Leaker

Publisher:

ISBN: 9781786608567

Category:

Page: 115

View: 310

Leaker critiques the role that the defence of free speech has played in legitimising the scapegoating of oppressed minorities while deflecting attention from the egregious operations of power that have led to ever greater inequality, injustice and capitalist destruction.--Nick Riemer, Senior Lecturer in English, University of Sydney
Categories: