The Trauma of Everyday Life

Author: Dr. Epstein

Publisher: Hay House, Inc

ISBN: 1781804567

Category: Philosophy

Page: 240

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Trauma does not just happen to a few unlucky people; it is the bedrock of our psychology. Death and illness touch us all, but even the everyday sufferings of loneliness and fear are traumatic. In The Trauma of Everyday Life renowned psychiatrist and author of Thoughts Without a Thinker Mark Epstein uncovers the transformational potential of trauma, revealing how it can be used for the mind's own development. Epstein finds throughout that trauma, if it doesn't destroy us, wakes us up to both our minds' own capacity and to the suffering of others. It makes us more human, caring and wise. It can be our greatest teacher, our freedom itself, and it is available to all of us. Western psychology teaches that if we understand the cause of trauma, we might move past it while many drawn to Eastern practices see meditation as a means of rising above, or distancing themselves from, their most difficult emotions. Both, Epstein argues, fail to recognize that trauma is an indivisible part of life and can be used as a tool for growth and an ever deeper understanding of change. When we regard trauma with this perspective, understanding that suffering is universal and without logic, our pain connects us to the world on a more fundamental level. Guided by the Buddha's life as a profound example of the power of trauma, Epstein's also closely examines his own experience and that of his psychiatric patients to help us all understand that the way out of pain is through it.
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Finding Your Voice Amid the Trauma and Drama of Everyday Life

Author: Nicole Sheppard

Publisher: Independently Published

ISBN: 9781728846545

Category: Body, Mind & Spirit

Page: 130

View: 5333

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As a woman, I find myself being a virtual hat rack. I wear so many different hats and each one demands more than the last. I'm a wife, mother, aunt, sister, mentor and friend. Those are just some of the hats that I wear and each one demands a significant amount of time effort and engagement. Due to my having to wear so many different hats I often have lost my own voice and authenticity in the process. This book was written to women everywhere regarding the drama, trauma and comma in their lives.Over the last decade I found myself increasingly swallowed up in the landscape of my life. As a mother, so much of my time is spent making sure that my children get a correct and right start in life. That means checking homework, mentoring each one so that they can become the powerful person they were designed and born to be. As a wife I've been supportive of my husband's practice, his career, and his masculine needs. As a female in general there are requirements that we find ourselves forced to follow.This book is not meant to bemoan or complain about the fact that being a female requires all these different hats. Rather it is a celebration of all of those hats and a blueprint of how to wear them and still maintain your authentic voice. In the midst of all the hats that I wear, the one that I seem to leave in the closet most often than not is the one called me. My voice had gotten lost in the shuffle of having to speak and address all the needs that surround me. This book was written for me to find my voice and at the same time help you to identify and accept your own voice.
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Thoughts Without A Thinker

Psychotherapy from a Buddhist Perspective

Author: Mark Epstein

Publisher: Basic Books

ISBN: 0465063926

Category: Psychology

Page: 272

View: 8173

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The line between psychology and spirituality has blurred, as clinicians, their patients, and religious seekers explore new perspectives on the self. A landmark contribution to the field of psychoanalysis, Thoughts Without a Thinker describes the unique psychological contributions offered by the teachings of Buddhism. Drawing upon his own experiences as a psychotherapist and meditator, New York-based psychiatrist Mark Epstein lays out the path to meditation-inspired healing, and offers a revolutionary new understanding of what constitutes a healthy emotional life.
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The Trauma of Birth

Author: Otto Rank

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN: 9780415211048

Category: Psychology

Page: 224

View: 2497

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Conflicting Identities and Multiple Masculinities takes as its focus the construction of masculinity in Western Europe from the early Middle Ages until the fifteenth century, crossing from pre-Christian Scandinavia across western Christendom. The essays consult a broad and representative cross section of sources including the work of theological, scholastic, and monastic writers, sagas, hagiography and memoirs, material culture, chronicles, exampla and vernacular literature, sumptuary legislation, and the records of ecclesiastical courts. The studies address questions of what constituted male identity, and male sexuality. How was masculinity constructed in different social groups? How did the secular and ecclesiastical ideals of masculinity reinforce each other or diverge? These essays address the topic of medieval men and, through a variety of theoretical, methodological, and disciplinary approaches, significantly extend our understanding of how, in the Middle Ages, masculinity and identity were conflicted and multifarious.
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Treating the Trauma of Rape

Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for PTSD

Author: Edna B. Foa,Barbara Olasov Rothbaum

Publisher: Guilford Press

ISBN: 9781572307360

Category: Psychology

Page: 286

View: 6775

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After reviewing the relevant treatment literature, the authors detail how to assess and treat PTSD using a cognitive-behavioral approach. Co mplete instructions are given for planning treatment, as well as for i ntroducing the patient to the various interventions. Nine exposure and stress management techniques are then detailed, including imaginal ex posure (trauma reliving), in vivo exposure, relaxation training, thoug ht-stopping, cognitive restructuring, covert modeling, and role-playin g. Enhancing the books clinical utility are numerous case examples il lustrating how to implement the techniques, as well as explanations of how to cope with common problems and complications in treatment. The final chapter presents detailed outlines of three suggested treatment programs.
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The Trauma of Terrorism

Sharing Knowledge and Shared Care, an International Handbook

Author: Yael Danieli,D. Brom,Joe Sills

Publisher: Haworth Press

ISBN: N.A

Category: Medical

Page: 858

View: 1106

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A compendium of the latest information on terrorism & its impact on individuals, families, communities, & nations. Issues explored include the need for cultural sensitivity when observing the damaging impact of terrorism & subsequent development of intervention programmes.
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The Trauma of Time

A Psychoanalytic Investigation

Author: Irvine Schiffer

Publisher: International Universities PressInc

ISBN: N.A

Category: Psychology

Page: 279

View: 9008

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Advice Not Given

A Guide to Getting Over Yourself

Author: Mark Epstein, M.D.

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 0399564330

Category: Psychology

Page: 224

View: 7621

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“Most people will never find a great psychiatrist or a great Buddhist teacher, but Mark Epstein is both, and the wisdom he imparts in Advice Not Given is an act of generosity and compassion. The book is a tonic for the ailments of our time.”—Ann Patchett, New York Times bestselling author of Commonwealth Our ego, and its accompanying sense of nagging self-doubt as we work to be bigger, better, smarter, and more in control, is one affliction we all share. And while our ego claims to have our best interests at heart, in its never-ending pursuit of attention and power, it sabotages the very goals it sets to achieve. In Advice Not Given, renowned psychiatrist and author Dr. Mark Epstein reveals how Buddhism and Western psychotherapy, two traditions that developed in entirely different times and places and, until recently, had nothing to do with each other, both identify the ego as the limiting factor in our well-being, and both come to the same conclusion: When we give the ego free rein, we suffer; but when it learns to let go, we are free. With great insight, and in a deeply personal style, Epstein offers readers a how-to guide that refuses a quick fix, grounded in two traditions devoted to maximizing the human potential for living a better life. Using the Eightfold Path, eight areas of self-reflection that Buddhists believe necessary for enlightenment, as his scaffolding, Epstein looks back productively on his own experience and that of his patients. While the ideas of the Eightfold Path are as old as Buddhism itself, when informed by the sensibility of Western psychotherapy, they become something more: a road map for spiritual and psychological growth, a way of dealing with the intractable problem of the ego. Breaking down the wall between East and West, Epstein brings a Buddhist sensibility to therapy and a therapist's practicality to Buddhism. Speaking clearly and directly, he offers a rethinking of mindfulness that encourages people to be more watchful of their ego, an idea with a strong foothold in Buddhism but now for the first time applied in the context of psychotherapy. Our ego is at once our biggest obstacle and our greatest hope. We can be at its mercy or we can learn to mold it. Completely unique and practical, Epstein's advice can be used by all--each in his or her own way--and will provide wise counsel in a confusing world. After all, as he says, "Our egos can use all the help they can get."
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The Neuropsychology of Everyday Life: Issues in Development and Rehabilitation

Author: David E. Tupper,Keith D. Cicerone

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 1461315115

Category: Medical

Page: 313

View: 9488

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For a period of some fifteen years following completion of my internship training in clinical psychology (1950-1951) at the Washington University School of Medicine and my concurrent successful navigation through that school's neuroanatomy course, clinical work in neuropsychology for me and the psychologists of my generation consisted almost exclusively of our trying to help our physician colleagues differentiate patients with neurologic disorders from those with psychiatric disorders. In time, experience led all of us from the several disciplines involved in this enterprise to the conclusion that the crude diagnostic techniques available to us circa 1945-1965 had garnered little valid information on which to base such complex, differential diagnostic decisions. It now is gratifying to look back and review the remarkable progress that has occurred in the field of clinical neuropsychology in the four decades since I was a graduate student. In the late 1940s such pioneers as Ward Halstead, Alexander Luria, George Yacorzynski, Hans-Lukas Teuber, and Arthur Benton already were involved in clinical studies that, by the late 1960s, would markedly have improved the quality of clinical practice. However, the only psychological tests that the clinical psychologist of my immediate post Second Wodd War generation had as aids for the diagnosis of neurologically based conditions involving cognitive deficit were such old standbys as the Wechsler-Bellevue, Rorschach, Draw A Person, Bender Gestalt, and Graham Kendall Memory for Designs Test.
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