Theaetetus

Author: Plato,Bernard Williams,M. J. Levett,Myles Burnyeat

Publisher: Hackett Publishing

ISBN: 9780872201583

Category: Philosophy

Page: 128

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M J Levett's elegant translation of Theaetetus, first published in 1928, is here revised by Myles Burnyeat to reflect contemporary standards of accuracy while retainingn the style, imagery, and idiomatic speech for which the Levett translation is unparalleled. Bernard Williams's concise introduction illuminates the powerful argument of this complex dialogue and illustrates its connections to contemporary metaphysical and epistemological concerns.
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The Theaetetus of Plato

Author: Plato,Lewis Campbell

Publisher: Franklin Classics Trade Press

ISBN: 9780343748555

Category:

Page: 406

View: 6606

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This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. To ensure a quality reading experience, this work has been proofread and republished using a format that seamlessly blends the original graphical elements with text in an easy-to-read typeface. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.
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The Theaetetus of Plato

With Translation and Notes (Classic Reprint)

Author: Plato Plato

Publisher: Forgotten Books

ISBN: 9781396803581

Category: Philosophy

Page: 274

View: 1018

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Excerpt from The Theaetetus of Plato: With Translation and Notes I. The dialogues of Plato, which I chose, from time to time, for the school work of my Sixth Form. Were chiefly the Protagoras, the Euthydemus, and the Hippias Major; since this last, if not Platonic, is very amusing and instructive. But I seldom allowed any of my foremost boys to leave school without reading with them privately in the evenings the Theaetetus also, as the best preparative for their deeper study of Plato and of Greek philosophy in general: Often adding to it the earlier books (1 - 4) of Aristotle's Ethics. In the past year, 1880, I took it for the sub jcet of my Cambridge Lectures, reading a translation to my class, and commenting as occasion required. This was executed in the first instance quite indepen dently, without reference to Professor Jowett's ver sion; but in revising my translation for the press I have compared the two, with frequent advantage, as might be expected, to the correction of my own work. Still the result is, that I have generally departed less widely from the literal Greek than my confrére in the Sister University: and the reason of this is evident. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.
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Plato's Theory of Knowledge

The Theaetetus and the Sophist

Author: Plato

Publisher: Courier Corporation

ISBN: 0486122018

Category: Philosophy

Page: 352

View: 1079

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Two masterpieces of Plato's later period. The Theaetetus offers a systematic treatment of the question "What is knowledge?" The Sophist follows Socrates' cross-examination of a self-proclaimed true philosopher.
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The Being of the Beautiful

Plato's Theaetetus, Sophist, and Statesman

Author: Plato

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226670393

Category: Philosophy

Page: 592

View: 2231

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The Being of the Beautiful collects Plato’s three dialogues, the Theaetetus, Sophist, and Statesmen, in which Socrates formulates his conception of philosophy while preparing for trial. Renowned classicist Seth Benardete’s careful translations clearly illuminate the dramatic and philosophical unity of these dialogues and highlight Plato’s subtle interplay of language and structure. Extensive notes and commentaries, furthermore, underscore the trilogy’s motifs and relationships. “The translations are masterpieces of literalness. . . . They are honest, accurate, and give the reader a wonderful sense of the Greek.”—Drew A. Hyland, Review of Metaphysics
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Reading Plato's Theaetetus

Author: Timothy D. J. Chappell

Publisher: Hackett Publishing

ISBN: 9780872207608

Category: Philosophy

Page: 246

View: 8173

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Timothy Chappell's new translation of the Theaetetus is presented here in short sections of text, each preceded by a summary of the argument and followed by his philosophical commentary on it. Introductory remarks discuss Plato and his works, his use of dialogue, the structure of the Theaetetus, and alternative interpretations of the work as a whole. A glossary and bibliography are provided.
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The Theaetetus of Plato

With Translation and Notes

Author: Benjamin Hall Kennedy

Publisher: Forgotten Books

ISBN: 9781330002650

Category: Philosophy

Page: 271

View: 4588

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Excerpt from The Theaetetus of Plato: With Translation and Notes I. The dialogues of Plato, which I chose, from time to time, for the school work of my Sixth Form, were chiefly the Protagoras, the Euthydemus, and the Hippias Major; since this last, if not Platonic, is very amusing and instructive. But I seldom allowed any of my foremost boys to leave school without reading with them privately in the evenings the Theaetetus also, as the best preparative for their deeper study of Plato and of Greek philosophy in general: often adding to it the earlier books (1-4) of Aristotle's Ethics. In the past year, 1880, I took it for the subject of my Cambridge Lectures, reading a translation to my class, and commenting as occasion required. This was executed in the first instance quite independently, without reference to Professor Jowett's version; but in revising my translation for the press I have compared the two, with frequent advantage, as might be expected, to the correction of my own work. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.
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The Rational Enterprise

logos in Plato's Theaetetus

Author: Rosemary Desjardins

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN: 9780887068386

Category: Philosophy

Page: 275

View: 8908

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“Desjardins’ conclusion, that the Theaetetus really does point to a particular theory of knowledge, certainly will be controversial, since for many people the idea that the Theaetetus fails to define knowledge is the cornerstone of their interpretation of Plato’s later philosophical thought. But whatever one thinks about the conclusion, it must be agreed that the manner in which it is defended is intrinsically important. Desjardins starts from the unassailable premise that the dialogues are internally unified, and that everything in the dialogues is there for a reason. Her method, then, is to show how some of the features of the dialogue that are usually not taken very seriously actually are very important. Of course, she is not the only scholar taking this sort of tack, but what she makes of the various elements of the Theaetetus is a most impressive construction.
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