The Symbolism of Medieval Churches

The Symbolism of Medieval Churches

The Symbolism of Medieval Churches: An Introduction explores the ways in
which the medieval church building and key features of it were used as symbols,
particularly to represent different relationships within the Church and the virtues
of ...

Author: Mark Spurrell

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9780429678073

Category: History

Page: 196

View: 701

The Symbolism of Medieval Churches: An Introduction explores the ways in which the medieval church building and key features of it were used as symbols, particularly to represent different relationships within the Church and the virtues of the Christian life. This book introduces the reader to the definition, form, and use of medieval symbols, and the significance that they held and still hold for some people, exploring the context in which church symbolism developed, and examining the major influences that shaped it. Among the topics discussed are allegory, typology, moral interpretation, and anagogy. Further chapters also consider the work of key figures, including Hugh and Richard of St Victor and Abbot Suger at St-Denis. Finally, the book contrasts the Eastern world with the Western world, taking a look at the late Middle Ages and what happened to church symbolism once Aristotle had ousted Plato from the schools. Entering into the medieval mind and placing church symbolism in its context, The Symbolism of Medieval Churches will be of great interest to upper-level undergraduates, postgraduates, and scholars working on Architectural History, Medieval Art, Church History, and Medieval History more widely.
Categories: History

Churches in Early Medieval Ireland

Churches in Early Medieval Ireland

We have already encountered this idea of the church as a symbol of the Christian
community . Such symbolism is central to an understanding of how these
buildings were conceived . In contrast to Roman temples , and indeed the
Jerusalem ...

Author: Tomás Ó Carragáin

Publisher: Paul Mellon Ctr for Studies

ISBN: UOM:39076002967540

Category: Architecture

Page: 392

View: 416

This is the first book devoted to churches in Ireland dating from the arrival of Christianity in the fifth century to the early stages of the Romanesque around 1100, including those built to house treasures of the golden age of Irish art, such as the Book of Kells and the Ardagh chalice. � Carrag�in's comprehensive survey of the surviving examples forms the basis for a far-reaching analysis of why these buildings looked as they did, and what they meant in the context of early Irish society. � Carrag�in also identifies a clear political and ideological context for the first Romanesque churches in Ireland and shows that, to a considerable extent, the Irish Romanesque represents the perpetuation of a long-established architectural tradition.
Categories: Architecture

Lectures on Medieval Church History

Lectures on Medieval Church History

The immense development of the sensuous and the symbolic , of which I have
spoken elsewhere , — the mistaken confidence that men might be effectually
taught by means of these without the living and interpreting voice , — did much to
 ...

Author: Richard Chenevix Trench

Publisher:

ISBN: WISC:89097206569

Category: Church history

Page: 444

View: 853

Categories: Church history

The History Principles and Practice of Symbolism in Christian Art

The History  Principles and Practice of Symbolism in Christian Art

The old church inventories supply us with many excellent illustrations of this use .
... It has been held that the symbolic colours used in the Middle Ages in the
services and adornment of the church were based on those used in the temple ...

Author: Frederick Edward Hulme

Publisher:

ISBN: STANFORD:36105042856612

Category: Christian art and symbolism

Page: 234

View: 354

Categories: Christian art and symbolism

The Church of England The medieval church

The Church of England  The medieval church

A curious testimony to some of the dulce lignum , dulces clavos , dulcia ferens
ritual and teaching of the church of his ... and crucifixes by of the tabernacle , and
the symbols of the which He was pleased to work miracles , temple of Solomon .

Author: Henry Donald Maurice Spence-Jones

Publisher:

ISBN: HARVARD:32044090304502

Category: England

Page:

View: 953

Categories: England

The Secret Language of Churches and Cathedrals

The Secret Language of Churches and Cathedrals

Today, in an age less attuned to iconography, such places of worship are often seen merely as magnificent works of architecture. This book restores the lost spiritual meaning of these fine and fascinating buildings.

Author: Richard Stemp

Publisher: Watkins Media Limited

ISBN: 9781780289618

Category: Cathedrals

Page: 224

View: 655

Who is depicted in that stained glass window? What is the significance of those geometric figures? Why are there fierce-looking beasts carved amidst all that beauty? Is there a deeper purpose behind the play of light and space in the nave? Why is there a pelican on the lectern and ornate foliage on the pillars? The largely illiterate medieval audience could read the symbols of churches and cathedrals and recognise the meanings and stories deliberately encoded into them. For worshippers these were places of religious education and an awe-inspiring feast that satisfied both the senses and the soul. Today, in an age less attuned to iconography, such places of worship are often seen merely as magnificent works of architecture. This book restores the lost spiritual meaning of these fine and fascinating buildings. The Secret Language of Churches & Cathedrals provides a three-part illustrated key by which modern visitors can understand the layout, fabric and decorative symbolism of Christian sacred structures - thereby bringing back to life their original atmosphere of awe and sanctity. Part One is an analysis of structural features, outside and in, from spires and domes to clerestories and brasses. Part Two is a theme-by-theme guide, which identifies significant figures, scenes, stories, animals, flowers, and the use of numbers, letters and patterns in paintings, carvings and sculpture. Part Three is a historical decoder, revealing the evolution of styles - from basilicas through Byzantine, Romanesque, Gothic and beyond. For all those who seek to know more about Christian art and architecture, this richly illustrated book will instruct and delight in equal measure.
Categories: Cathedrals

Eastern Medieval Architecture

Eastern Medieval Architecture

At all levels of society, Eastern medieval people looked at, inhabited, and
responded to their architectural environment, ... treatise attributed to the eighth-
century patriarch Germanos I of Constantinople, outlines the symbolism of the
church ...

Author: Robert G. Ousterhout

Publisher: Onassis Series in Hellenic Cul

ISBN: 9780190272739

Category: Architecture

Page: 816

View: 876

The rich and diverse architectural traditions of the Eastern Mediterranean and adjacent regions are the subject of this book. Representing the visual residues of a "forgotten" Middle Ages, the social and cultural developments of the Byzantine Empire, the Caucasus, the Balkans, Russia, and the Middle East parallel the more familiar architecture of Western Europe. The book offers an expansive view of the architectural developments of the Byzantine Empire and areas under its cultural influence, as well as the intellectual currents that lie behind their creation. The book alternates chapters that address chronological or regionally-based developments with thematic studies that focus on the larger cultural concerns, as they are expressed in architectural form.
Categories: Architecture

The Living Church

The Living Church

The symbolism was attached by the piety of a later day . The characteristic
feature of the ... The medieval Church is a " mys - terious succession of self -
contained rooms , seemingly stretching away into infinity . ” However beautiful
they may ...

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN: WISC:89062388442

Category:

Page:

View: 346

Categories:

Trustworthy Men

Trustworthy Men

How Inequality and Faith Made the Medieval Church Ian Forrest ... lost through
ignorance.24 Whether quantified or not trustworthiness as understood within
medieval church administration was an attributed characteristic and a symbolic
role.

Author: Ian Forrest

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9780691180601

Category: Religion

Page: 520

View: 689

The medieval church was founded on and governed by concepts of faith and trust--but not in the way that is popularly assumed. Offering a radical new interpretation of the institutional church and its social consequences in England, Ian Forrest argues that between 1200 and 1500 the ability of bishops to govern depended on the cooperation of local people known as trustworthy men and shows how the combination of inequality and faith helped make the medieval church. Trustworthy men (in Latin, viri fidedigni) were jurors, informants, and witnesses who represented their parishes when bishops needed local knowledge or reliable collaborators. Their importance in church courts, at inquests, and during visitations grew enormously between the thirteenth and fifteenth centuries. The church had to trust these men, and this trust rested on the complex and deep-rooted cultures of faith that underpinned promises and obligations, personal reputation and identity, and belief in God. But trust also had a dark side. For the church to discriminate between the trustworthy and untrustworthy was not to identify the most honest Christians but to find people whose status ensured their word would not be contradicted. This meant men rather than women, and—usually—the wealthier tenants and property holders in each parish. Trustworthy Men illustrates the ways in which the English church relied on and deepened inequalities within late medieval society, and how trust and faith were manipulated for political ends.
Categories: Religion

Suggestions on the arrangement and characteristics of Parish Churches

Suggestions on the arrangement and characteristics of Parish Churches

The custom of taking holy water on entering the Church originated in the primitive
practice of washing the hands , as a symbol of purification , before entering the
House of God . Large fountains were erected outside of Churches for this ...

Author: J. J. MACCARTHY

Publisher:

ISBN: BL:A0019430789

Category:

Page: 47

View: 491

Categories:

Women s Space

Women s Space

Art historical and literary perspectives on the place of women in the medieval church.

Author: Virginia Chieffo Raguin

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN: 0791463656

Category: Religion

Page: 261

View: 675

Art historical and literary perspectives on the place of women in the medieval church.
Categories: Religion

Encyclopedia of Medieval Church Art

Encyclopedia of Medieval Church Art

Reproducing over 900 photographs taken by the author (most using natural light) this is a guide to the themes, origins, symbolism, variations and distribution of medieval church art in the British Isles.

Author: Edward G. Tasker

Publisher: B T Batsford Limited

ISBN: STANFORD:36105016517414

Category: Art

Page: 320

View: 715

Reproducing over 900 photographs taken by the author (most using natural light) this is a guide to the themes, origins, symbolism, variations and distribution of medieval church art in the British Isles.
Categories: Art

Drama and Imagery in English Medieval Churches

Drama and Imagery in English Medieval Churches

The religious significance of the imagery I have mentioned was , of course ,
common to the teaching of Holy Church throughout Europe and the two great
allegories of Death were both of Continental origin . The parallels between the
play and ...

Author: Mary Désirée Anderson

Publisher: CUP Archive

ISBN:

Category: Art and literature

Page: 248

View: 647

Categories: Art and literature

The Wise Master Builder Platonic Geometry in Plans of Medieval Abbeys and Cathederals

The Wise Master Builder  Platonic Geometry in Plans of Medieval Abbeys and Cathederals

This work re-opens the debate about the importance of geometry and symbolism in medieval architectural design and argues the case for attributing an intellectual meaning to the planning of abbeys and cathedrals.

Author: Nigel Hiscock

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781351769747

Category: Social Science

Page: 462

View: 724

This title was first published in 2000: Did the plan of medieval churches have any underlying symbolic meaning? This work re-opens the debate about the importance of geometry and symbolism in medieval architectural design and argues the case for attributing an intellectual meaning to the planning of abbeys and cathedrals. In challenging prevailing claims for the use of arithmetical rations in architectural design, notably those based on the square root of two, Dr Hiscock advances a perspective consisting of proportions derived from the figures of Platonic geometry - the square, the equilateral triangle and the pentagon - and provides evidence for the symbolic interpretation of these figures. The investigation further reveals whole series of geometric relationships between some of England's most celebrated Norman cathedrals, such as Norwich or Durham, together with a wide sample from the Continent, from Old St Peter's in Rome to Chartres Cathedral, and sets out a comprehensive design method in each case. Hiscock first demonstrates the proposition that the ideas of Christian Platonism, including number and geometry, remained current and were employed in the thought of the early Middle Ages. In particular, he argues that they can be associated with the leading persons in the 10th-century revival of monasticism and that they found expression in the "white mantle of churches" that spread across Western Europe at the end of the first millennium AD. The book then provides a detailed analysis of the geometric proportions of church plans between the 9th and 12th centuries in Germany, France and in England. This research seeks to demonstrate that a coherent sequence of geometric forms can be seen in thse plans, forms which correspond to the key figures of Platonic geometry as understood in the context of Christian Platonist thought. In conclusion, the author shows how the system of design proposed could be set out on site using the known working methods of medieval masons.
Categories: Social Science

Medieval Number Symbolism

Medieval Number Symbolism

In this classic study, a noted scholar reveals "how deeply rooted in medieval thought was the consciousness of numbers, not as mathematical tools, nor yet as the counters in a game, but as fundamental realities, alive with memories and ...

Author: Vincent Foster Hopper

Publisher: Courier Corporation

ISBN: 0486414302

Category: Body, Mind & Spirit

Page: 241

View: 751

In this classic study, a noted scholar reveals "how deeply rooted in medieval thought was the consciousness of numbers, not as mathematical tools, nor yet as the counters in a game, but as fundamental realities, alive with memories and eloquent with meaning."
Categories: Body, Mind & Spirit

The Liturgy of the Medieval Church

The Liturgy of the Medieval Church

This longitudinal axis was cut by the Resurrection and the Ascension over the
transept arches at the eastern end of the north and south aisles.21 The vertical
extension and the attendant symbolism of the celestial realm in the upper levels
of ...

Author: E. Ann Matter

Publisher: Western Michigan Univ Medieval

ISBN: UOM:39015060871806

Category: Religion

Page: 714

View: 319

This volume seeks to address the needs of teachers and advanced students who are preparing classes on the Middle Ages or who find themselves confounded in their studies by reference to the various liturgies that were fundamental to the lives of medieval peoples. In a series of essays, scholars of the liturgy examine The Shape of the Liturgical Year, Particular Liturgies, The Physical Setting of the Liturgy, The Liturgy and Books, and Liturgy and the Arts. A concluding essay, which originated in notes left behind by the late C. Clifford Flanigan, seeks to open the field, to examine liturgy within the larger and more inclusive category of ritual. The essays are intended to be introductory but to provide the basic facts and the essential bibliography for further study. They approach particular problems assuming a knowledge of medieval Europe but little expertise in liturgical studies per se.
Categories: Religion

The Medieval Church Success Or Failure

The Medieval Church  Success Or Failure

In short Lull articles which made up the equipment of was partly the author
encouraging the a knight . The men of the Middle Ages reading of his book and
partly the en were devoted to symbolism , but nowhere thusiast seeking to
propagate ...

Author: Bernard S. Bachrach

Publisher: New York : Holt, Rinehart and Winston

ISBN: UOM:39015020709526

Category: Church history

Page: 120

View: 880

Categories: Church history

Monastic Spaces and Their Meanings

Monastic Spaces and Their Meanings

The reason that I focus on the trends in this discipline is that architectural
iconography has traditionally and consistently utilized the medieval church as its
primary focus of analysis . Our conceptions of the symbolism and form in church ...

Author: Megan Cassidy-Welch

Publisher: Brepols Pub

ISBN: UVA:X004562876

Category: History

Page: 293

View: 842

Medieval Cistercians distinguished between material and imagined space, while the landscapes in which they lived were perceived as both physical sites and abstract topographies. Ostensibly, Cistercians lived in intensely regulated and confined physical circumstances in accordance with ideals of enclosure articulated in the Regula S. Benedicti. However, Cistercian representations of space also express ideas of transcendence and freedom. This monograph focuses on the abbeys of northern England during the period 1132-1400 (Fountains, Rievaulx, Jervaulx, Meaux, Sawley, Roche, Byland and Kirkstall) to facilitate a microhistory of cultural, textual, personnel and architectural comparisons. Post-twelfth century Cistercian history has been understudied, in comparison with research into the euphoria of the order's foundation, and has tended to focus on 'ideals' versus 'reality', whereas this study considers Cistercian houses in terms of contingency, singularity and specificity. The author engages with the work of theorists such as Michel Foucault, Pierre Bourdieu and Henri Lefebvre, all of whom have explored the cultural production of space and the meanings attributed to certain spaces by abstract reference, performative practice and institutional direction. The study is richly illustrated with 45 images of the landscape and space of these houses and enables the reader to see how one monastic order positioned itself in relation to geography, architecture, institution, community and cosmos, and dealt with the dialectic between regulation and imagination, freedom and enclosure. Patrick Geary (UCLA) commends this study as being 'based on a wide reading of Cistercian texts and blends solid text-critical historical scholarship with more conceptual approaches in a most convincing way'.
Categories: History

Scottish Medieval Churches

Scottish Medieval Churches

The raising , or elevation , of mortal remains to leave an empty tomb below as an
additional focus of veneration in churches which possessed a crypt was quite in
the spirit of the age . There was no crypt in Dunfermline wherein the symbolism ...

Author: Stewart Cruden

Publisher: John Donald

ISBN: UOM:39015015863635

Category: Architecture, Medieval

Page: 210

View: 572

Categories: Architecture, Medieval