The Strange Last Voyage of Donald Crowhurst

The Strange Last Voyage of Donald Crowhurst

From in-depth interviews with Crowhurst's family and friends and telling excerpts from his logbooks, Tomalin and Hall develop a tale of tragic self-delusion and public deception, a haunting portrait of a complex, deeply troubled man and his ...

Author: Nicholas Tomalin

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN: 9781473635371

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 320

View: 189

'A masterpiece.' New Yorker 'Wholly riveting, brilliantly researched.' Evening Standard 'A meticulous investigation into the seeds of disaster... fascinating, uncomfortable reading.' Sunday Times In 1968, Donald Crowhurst was trying to market a nautical navigation device he had developed, and saw the Sunday Times Golden Globe round the world sailing race as the perfect opportunity to showcase his product. Few people knew that he wasn't an experienced deep-water sailor. His progress was so slow that he decided to short-cut the journey, while falsifying his location through radio messages from his supposed course. Everyone following the race thought that he was winning, and a hero's welcome awaited him at home in Britain. But on 10 July 1968, eight months after he set off, his wife was told that his boat had been discovered drifting in mid-Atlantic. Crowhurst was missing, assumed drowned, and there was much speculation that this was one of the great mysteries of the sea. In this masterpiece of investigative journalism, Nicholas Tomalin and Ron Hall reconstruct one of the greatest hoaxes of our time. From in-depth interviews with Crowhurst's family and friends and telling excerpts from his logbooks, Tomalin and Hall develop a tale of tragic self-delusion and public deception, a haunting portrait of a complex, deeply troubled man and his journey into the heart of darkness.
Categories: Sports & Recreation

Strange Voyage of Donald Crowhurst

Strange Voyage of Donald Crowhurst

Tomalin's reconstruction of Crowhuurst's life and death, now a classic of the sea, is reprinted here under McGraw's International Marine imprint. Annotation copyright by Book News, Inc., Portland, OR

Author: Nicholas Tomalin

Publisher: International Marine Publishing Company

ISBN: 0070650845

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 317

View: 458

In the fall of 1968, Donald Crowhurst set out from England in his untested trimaran, a competitor in the first single-handed nonstop around-the-world sailboat race. Eight months later, the boat was found in mid-Atlantic with no one on board. This journalistic masterpiece reconstructs what really happened and provides details on one of the greatest hoaxes of our time. 48 illustrations.
Categories: Biography & Autobiography

Desperate Voyage

Desperate Voyage

Of all these, Donald Crowhurst was the least likely and, ultimately, the most tragic. In 1970, not long after Donald Crowhurst's death, Nicholas Tomalin and Ron Hall assembled a masterful narrative entitled The Strange Last Voyage of ...

Author: Edward Renehan

Publisher: New Street Communications

ISBN:

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 112

View: 942

Ed Renehan's Desperate Voyage, the retelling of Donald Crowhurst's tragic voyage during the 1968/69 Golden Globe Race, is a finely honed account of what has become offshore sailing's most enduring story. Drawing on an array of sources, Renehan's Crowhurst is Shakespearean: narcissistic and reviled but also sympathetic, a flawed human consumed by ambition. Although I've known this story forever, Renehan's fresh, haunting narrative had me hoping for a new ending, a better outcome this time around. Alas, it's not to be, you just keep reading until it breaks your heart. - John Kretschmer, author of Sailing a Serious Ocean, At the Mercy of the Sea, Flirting with Mermaids, and Cape Horn to Starboard The first non-stop single-handed race around the world in 1968 was a cauldron of huge personalities and epic sea tales. Ironically, it was the complete failure of Donald Crowhurst that has garnered the most passion and interest. Few stories equal the modern Greek tragedy that is Crowhurst's, exposed like a raw nerve to those who loved and supported him when his Teignmouth Electronwas found abandoned in the Atlantic, along with dual logbooks that revealed Crowhurst's spectacular hoax and probable suicide. Edward Renehan's able and concise recounting of the story is not the first, nor will it be the last because the tale is the quintessential cautionary tale filled with characters, dreams, and dilemmas with which we are all familiar. Desperate Voyage provides readers precious insights through concentration on the backstory and how Crowhurst's basic personality drove him inexorably towards disaster, and like a dangerous vortex, dragged his family, friends, and supporters into his sphere. Throughout Renehan's clever telling, and because I have spent some time alone and tested at sea myself, I could not help but recognize the conditions that try sailors' souls, but also people I know from every walk of life and the troubles into which they have gotten themselves. For the first time, I even could see my relationship to Crowhurst, how I, too, have shaped and been shaped by the strains of life and thwarted goals. Simply fascinating. - Steven Callahan, New York Times bestselling author of Adrift Edward Renehan’s Desperate Voyage is incisive, haunting, and absorbing. For those, like me, initially unfamiliar with this great sea drama, it is a perfect introduction to the story of Donald Crowhurst and the Golden Globe Race of 1968. Crowhurst is flawed and complicated, a tragic and captivating figure, and Renehan’s retelling, Shakespearean in scope, is wonderfully crafted and endlessly fascinating. - William Boyle, author of the critically-acclaimed Gravesend and Death Don’t Have No Mercy On a dismal day at the end of October, 1968, a weekend sailor by the name of Donald Crowhurst set out from England in a flimsy trimaran, hoping to win the LondonSunday Times "Golden Globe" race and become the first solo sailor to circumnavigate the world non-stop. His was an exercise in over-arching ambition, delusion, and tragedy such as the world has seldom seen. Before it was over, the world media would be subject to a fraud of enormous proportions, and Crowhurst would die a madman in the middle of the Atlantic. What he left behind was a shattered boat, a shattered family, and this incredible story.
Categories: Sports & Recreation

Last Voyages

Last Voyages

Strange. Last. Voyage. of. Donald. Crowhurst. and. the. Trimaran. Teignmouth. Electron. (1969). The story of Donald Crowhurst's voyage in the trimaran Teignmouth Electron and its tragic ending is almost too well known to bear repeating.

Author: Nicholas Gray

Publisher: Fernhurst Books Limited

ISBN: 9781909911932

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 240

View: 801

Looking back at the lives and sailing careers of some of our lifetime’s finest yachtsmen, this collection of eleven original, moving accounts is just as much a celebration of the good – tales of hope, achievement and courageous spirit – as it is an account of their tragic final voyages. Included are world-renowned racers, like Eric Tabarly and Rob James, highly experienced cruisers and adventurers, like Peter Tangvald and Bill Tilman, and the notoriously ill-prepared Donald Crowhurst, as well as other famous and some less well-known sailors. Starting with the sad loss of Frank Davison and Reliance in 1949, the book concludes with the amazing last voyage of Philip Walwyn in 2015 – crossing the Atlantic single-handed in his 12 Metre yacht Kate. All of the men and women described were friends with or known to the author, Nicholas Gray, who himself competed in several short-handed long distance races, where he met and raced against many of these fascinating characters. Peppered with photographs showcasing the sailors and their yachts, this is a refreshing look at those who have helped to shape this sport’s history, honouring their lives and accomplishments before detailing their tragic last voyages.
Categories: Biography & Autobiography

A History of Ambition in 50 Hoaxes History in 50

A History of Ambition in 50 Hoaxes  History in 50

“Introduction,” in Nicholas Tomalin and Ron Hall, The Strange Last Voyage of Donald Crowhurst (Camden, ME: International Marine Publications, 1995), xi–xix. “Science of the 34th America's Cup.” National Sailing Hall of Fame.

Author: Gale Eaton

Publisher: Tilbury House Publishers and Cadent Publishing

ISBN: 9780884484936

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 288

View: 784

What do the Trojan Horse, Piltdown Man, Keely Motor Company, and Ponzi Scheme have in common? They were all famous hoaxes, carefully designed and bolstered with false evidence. The con artists in this book pursued a variety of ambitions—making money, winning wars, mocking authority, finding fame, trading an ordinary life for a glamorous one—but they all chose the lowest, fastest road to get there. Every hoax is a curtain, and behind it is a deceiver operating levers and smoke machines to make us see what is not there and miss what is. As P.T. Barnum knew, you can short-circuit critical thinking in any century by telling people what they want to hear. Most scams operate on a personal scale, but some have shaped the balance of world power, inspired explorers to sail uncharted seas, derailed scientific progress, or caused terrible massacres. A HISTORY OF AMBITION IN 50 HOAXES guides us through a rogue’s gallery of hustlers, liars, swindlers, imposters, scammers, pretenders, and cheats. In Gale Eaton’s wide-ranging synthesis, the history of deception is a colorful tour, with surprising insights behind every curtain. Fountas & Pinnell Level Z+
Categories: Juvenile Nonfiction

Driving Home

Driving Home

Strange. Last. Voyage. of. Donald. Crowhurst. More than thirty years after Donald Crowhurst stepped to his death in the Atlantic, somewhere between the Caribbean and the coast of North Africa, he is enjoying a busy new life as a ...

Author: Jonathan Raban

Publisher: Pan Macmillan

ISBN: 9781509881062

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page:

View: 762

For over thirty years Jonathan Raban has written about people and places in transition or on the margins, of journeys undertaken and destinations never quite reached; of isolation and alienation, but also of what it means to belong, to feel rooted. Driving Home, a collection of pieces spanning two decades, charts its course through American history and recent world events. Raban writes with an outsider’s eye for the public and the personal, about political, social, and cultural affairs, and about literature, his tone intimate but never nostalgic, and always fresh. Variously frank, witty, and provocative, Driving Home is part essay collection, part diary – and wholly engrossing. ‘A passionate history buff and a skilled raconteur . . . it’s a fine ride’ Sunday Times ‘A fabulous collection’ Observer
Categories: Biography & Autobiography

Round About the Earth

Round About the Earth

William Rodarmor (Dobbs Ferry, ny, 1995), 5, 7; nicholas Tomalin and Ron hall, The Strange Last Voyage of Donald Crowhurst (new york, 1995), 19–20; Knox-Johnston, World of My Own, 2. Moitessier, Long Way, 60, 72, 74–75, 76, 77, 78–79, ...

Author: Joyce E. Chaplin

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 9781439100066

Category: History

Page: 560

View: 386

In this first full history of around-the-world travel, Joyce E. Chaplin brilliantly tells the story of circumnavigation. Round About the Earth is a witty, erudite, and colorful account of the outrageous ambitions that have inspired men and women to circle the entire planet. For almost five hundred years, human beings have been finding ways to circle the Earth—by sail, steam, or liquid fuel; by cycling, driving, flying, going into orbit, even by using their own bodily power. The story begins with the first centuries of circumnavigation, when few survived the attempt: in 1519, Ferdinand Magellan left Spain with five ships and 270 men, but only one ship and thirty-five men returned, not including Magellan, who died in the Philippines. Starting with these dangerous voyages, Joyce Chaplin takes us on a trip of our own as we travel with Francis Drake, William Dampier, Louis-Antoine de Bougainville, and James Cook. Eventually sea travel grew much safer and passengers came on board. The most famous was Charles Darwin, but some intrepid women became circumnavigators too—a Lady Brassey, for example. Circumnavigation became a fad, as captured in Jules Verne’s classic novel, Around the World in Eighty Days. Once continental railroads were built, circumnavigators could traverse sea and land. Newspapers sponsored racing contests, and people sought ways to distinguish themselves—by bicycling around the world, for instance, or by sailing solo. Steamships turned round-the-world travel into a luxurious experience, as with the tours of Thomas Cook & Son. Famous authors wrote up their adventures, including Mark Twain and Jack London and Elizabeth Jane Cochrane (better known as Nellie Bly). Finally humans took to the skies to circle the globe in airplanes. Not much later, Sputnik, Gagarin, and Glenn pioneered a new kind of circumnavigation— in orbit. Through it all, the desire to take on the planet has tested the courage and capacity of the bold men and women who took up the challenge. Their exploits show us why we think of the Earth as home. Round About the Earth is itself a thrilling adventure.
Categories: History

Cruising World

Cruising World

ORE THAN 30 YEARS AFTER DONALD Crowhurst stepped to his death in the Atlantic, somewhere between the Caribbean and the ... Crowhurst comes from one book, and it's the narrative brilliance of The Strange Last Voyage of Donald Crowhurst ...

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Page: 2188

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MotorBoating

MotorBoating

THE BOOK SHELF By Tony Gibbs The Strange Last Voyage of Donald Crowhurst, by Nicholas Tomalin and Ron Hall ($7.95: Stein & Day, 7 East 48th St., New York, N.Y. 10017) This may well be the best true sea adventure to be published in this ...

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Page: 146

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Recovering Sanity

Recovering Sanity

The description of events relating to the life and strange adventure of Donald Crowhurst comes from the excellent work of N. Tomalin and R. Hall, The Strange Last Voyage of Donald Crowhurst (New York: Stein & Day, 1970).

Author: E Podvoll

Publisher: Shambhala Publications

ISBN: 9780834828728

Category: Psychology

Page: 416

View: 409

Recovering Sanity is a compassionately written examination of the experience of psychosis and related mental illnesses. By presenting four in-depth profiles of illness and recovery, Dr. Edward Podvoll reveals the brilliance and chaos of the psychotic mind and demonstrates its potential for recovery outside of traditional institutional settings. Dr. Podvoll counters the conventional thinking that the millions of Americans suffering from psychosis can never fully recover. He offers a bold new approach to treatment that involves home care with a specially trained team of practitioners. Using "basic attendance," a treatment technique inspired by the author's study of Buddhist psychology, healthcare professionals can use the tools of compassion and awareness to help patients recover their underlying sanity. Originally published as The Seduction of Madness, this reissue includes new introductory material and two new appendices.
Categories: Psychology

Strange and Dangerous Dreams

Strange and Dangerous Dreams

Scott's own version of his story is told in Scott's Last Expedition (London: Smith, Elder & Co., 1913). ... The definitive work on Crowhurst's life is Nicholas Tomalin and Ron Hall's The Strange Last Voyage of Donald Crowhurst (London: ...

Author: Geoff Powter

Publisher: The Mountaineers Books

ISBN: 9781594852343

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 256

View: 560

* Explores the darker psychological drama behind the exploits of eleven adventurers, famous and lesser-known * Written by a practicing clinical psychologist * Accounts include heretofore unpublished information provided by archival witnesses, friends, and family Every culture, in every era, has its adventure myths: The golden hero willing to walk through fire elevates us all beyond our fears and limits. But more often than readily seen, there are darker reasons for dangerous pursuits. Where falls the line between adventure and madness? Geoff Powter, a practicing clinical psychologist, looks into the stories of eleven troubled adventurers, divided into three categories: The Burdened, The Bent, and The Lost. * Polar explorer Robert Falcon Scott has been called a "willing martyr" ready to die for the mystical deliverance of adventure. * Meriwether Lewis, convinced that he had failed to achieve the objectives set by mentor and father figure, Thomas Jefferson, died by his own hand. * Maurice Wilson's plan for climbing Everest included deliberately crashing his plane as high as possible on the mountain. * Jean Batten was a remarkably driven early aviator whose clothes and make-up were always more perfect than her flying technique. * Polar balloonist Solomon Andrée was certain that his rigorous understanding of scientific principles would overcome any challenge posed by nature or equipment failure. * Aleister Crowley, a brilliant mountaineer who founded the Golden Dawn cult, was labeled pathologically, and even fatally, arrogant. In each of these stories, darkness of some kind -- ambition, ego, a thirst for redemption, the need to please others -- carried these characters in a perilous direction. In the end, understanding these difficult but utterly human stories helps us comprehend the deepest purpose and allure of adventure, and, ultimately, to more honestly measure ourselves.
Categories: Biography & Autobiography

Boating

Boating

BOOKS & PUBLICATIDNS THE STRANGE LAST VOYAGE OF DONALD CROWHURST by Nicholas Tomalin and Ron Hall: published by Stein and Day. 7 East 48th Street, New York, N. Y. 10017; 31 7 p. $7.95. Authors Nicholas Tomalin and Ron Hall, ...

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Page: 1132

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On the Strange Place of Religion in Contemporary Art

On the Strange Place of Religion in Contemporary Art

Disappearance at Sea II is an austere and cold artwork , in contrast to the actual story of Crowhurst , which was reported in the best - seller The Strange Last Voyage of Donald Crowhurst . In real life Crowhurst sailed back and forth ...

Author: James Elkins

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN: 0415969891

Category: Art

Page: 136

View: 857

Can contemporary art say anything about spirituality? Answering this question and more, On the Strange Place of Religion in Contemporary Art explores the curious disconnection between spirituality and current art.
Categories: Art

Framing the Ocean 1700 to the Present

 Framing the Ocean  1700 to the Present

Nicholas Tomalin and Ron Hall piece together the events surrounding Crowhurst's last journey from these logbooks in The Strange Last Voyage of Donald Crowhurst (Tomalin and Hall, 1995), which inspired Dean to make this work.

Author: Tricia Cusack

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781351566735

Category: Art

Page: 302

View: 873

Before the eighteenth century, the ocean was regarded as a repulsive and chaotic deep. Despite reinvention as a zone of wonder and pleasure, it continued to be viewed in the West and elsewhere as ?uninhabited?, empty space. This collection, spanning the eighteenth century to the present, recasts the ocean as ?social space?, with particular reference to visual representations. Part I focuses on mappings and crossings, showing how the ocean may function as a liminal space between places and cultures but also connects and imbricates them. Part II considers ships as microcosmic societies, shaped for example by the purpose of the voyage, the mores of shipboard life, and cross-cultural encounters. Part III analyses narratives accreted to wrecks and rafts, what has sunk or floats perilously, and discusses attempts to recuperate plastic flotsam. Part IV plumbs ocean depths to consider how underwater creatures have been depicted in relation to emergent disciplines of natural history and museology, how mermaids have been reimagined as a metaphor of feminist transformation, and how the symbolism of coral is deployed by contemporary artists. This engaging and erudite volume will interest a range of scholars in humanities and social sciences, including art and cultural historians, cultural geographers, and historians of empire, travel, and tourism.
Categories: Art

The Race

The Race

New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1956. Tetley, Nigel. Trimaran Solo. Lymington, U.K.: Nautical Publishing, 1970. Tomalin, Nicholas, and Ron Hall. The Strange Last Voyage of Donald Crowhurst. London: Hodder and Stoughton, 1970.

Author: Tim Zimmermann

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

ISBN: 9780547347066

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 364

View: 545

A contributing editor for Outside magazine provides a behind-the-scenes look at the fast-paced, around-the-world sailing race. An invigorating behind-the-scenes look at the world of extreme sailing, The Race is also a taut, engrossing account of the first running of the competition called “The Race,” which began on December 31, 2000, in Barcelona and ended sixty-two days later in Marseilles. The most intense event of its kind—a nonstop circumnavigation of the globe in the fastest boats ever built—The Race attracts some of the world’s best sailors and arguably its most eccentric personalities. Tim Zimmermann, an experienced blue-water sailor, relates in knuckle-whitening detail how and why sailors risk millions of dollars and their lives to dash around the world in record time. He garnishes this story with a chronicle of the tumultuous history of extreme sailing from the nineteenth century to today. Zimmermann “puts the reader right on board with the tough, colorful crews as they take a crash course (sometimes literally) in how to handle these astonishing machines” (Derek Lundy, author of Godforsaken Sea). Praise for The Race “Zimmerman turns a daring race of unthinkably fast, high-tech sailing machines into a page-turner.” —Bruce Knecht, author of The Proving Ground “This is probably the finest account of the history of the circumnavigator’s quest yet written, refreshingly free of hyperbole and false expectation. Zimmerman’s pace matches that of The Race itself, though he never puts his bow under.” —Lincoln P. Paine, author of Ships of the World “Zimmerman’s behind-the-scenes look at the characters, boats, and technology in The Race—as well as the rich sailing history that preceded it—captures the nuances of adventure only a masochist could love. The Race was a wild ride, and The Race is a fine read.” —Herb McCormick, sailing correspondent of the New York Times, editor of Cruising World
Categories: Sports & Recreation

Conversations with Robert Stone

Conversations with Robert Stone

Do you think a book at all close to Outerbridge Reach could have been written had you not come across Ron Hall's and Nicholas Tomalin's The Strange Last Voyage of Donald Crowhurst? Stone: Yes, I think it could have, but that situation ...

Author: William Heath

Publisher: Univ. Press of Mississippi

ISBN: 9781496808929

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 208

View: 218

Ever since A Hall of Mirrors depicted the wild side of New Orleans in the 1960s, Robert Stone (1937-2015) has situated novels where America has shattered and the action is at a pitch. In Dog Soldiers, he covered the Vietnam War and drug smuggling. A Flag for Sunrise captured revolutionary discontent in Central America. Children of Light exposed the crass values of Hollywood. Outerbridge Reach depicted how existential angst can lead to a longing for heroic transcendence. The clash of religions in Jerusalem drove Damascus Gate. Traditional town-gown tensions amid twenty-first-century culture wars propelled Death of the Black-Haired Girl. Stone's reputation rests on his mastery of the craft of fiction. These interviews are replete with insights about the creative process as he responds with disarming honesty to probing questions about his major works. Stone also has fascinating things to say about his remarkable life--a schizophrenic mother, a stint in the navy, his involvement with Ken Kesey's Merry Pranksters, and his presence at the creation of the counterculture. From the publication of A Hall of Mirrors until his death in 2015, Stone was a major figure in American literature.
Categories: Biography & Autobiography

The Odysseum

The Odysseum

The Strange Last Voyage of Donald Crowhurst, Nicholas Tomalin and Ron Hall (Hodder & Stoughton, 1970) An utterly compelling account of Crowhurst's hoax journey and deteriorating state of mind, and a masterpiece of investigate journalism ...

Author: David Bramwell

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN: 9781473668966

Category: Body, Mind & Spirit

Page: 240

View: 855

THE ODYSSEUM explores extraordinary journeys, pilgrimages, expeditions and meanders of the mind that helped us to figure out our place in the world. We will learn about epic trips to the bottom of the ocean, to outer space and to the deepest cave on earth ("like climbing an inverted Mount Everest") as well as micro-journeys, such as Xavier de Maistre's six-week odyssey around his bedroom and the tale of a Nazi who attempted to walk around the world without setting foot outside of his prison. Brought to you by the bestselling authors of THE ODDITORIUM and THE MYSTERIUM, this book is a call to arms to step off the beaten path and embark on your own eccentric, remarkable odyssey.
Categories: Body, Mind & Spirit

Origins of a Journey

Origins of a Journey

“Robert McCrum Meets the Family of the Infamous 'Lone Sailor,' Donald Crowhurst.” The Observer. 04 Apr. 2009. Web. Accessed 25 Apr. 2018. Tomalin, Nicholas, and Hall, Ron. The Strange Last Voyage of Donald Crowhurst. Quercus, 2017.

Author: Daniel Grogan

Publisher: Cider Mill Press

ISBN: 9781604338041

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 320

View: 252

Feed the adventurer in you with Origins of a Journey, more than 120 stories of history’s most famous travellers and their finest adventures. Inside each of us lives an explorer who yearns to visit the great unknown. Feed the adventurer in you with Origins of a Journey, more than 120 stories of history’s most famous travellers and their finest adventures. These are the tales behind the history’s bravest pioneers, bringing you from the ocean’s black depths to the top of Mount Everest. Harriet Tubman ferries fugitive slaves along the Underground Railroad—not once, not twice, but 19 times. Teddy Roosevelt risks life, limb, and sanity as he charts the Amazon’s River of Doubt. Buoyed by the voice of God, Joan of Arc travels to Vaucouleurs to petition Charles for a chance to fight for France. Charles Darwin notices several different finch species while touring the Galápagos Islands, fundamentally changing how we understand life. Spanning from 500 BC to today, Origins of a Journey teaches us that there is always value in an adventure, no matter how small—or doomed—it may be.
Categories: Biography & Autobiography

Tales of Freedom

Tales of Freedom

1 In order to compress the unfolding drama of Donald Crowhurst's eight-and-a-half months at sea into a few pages, ... Ron Hall and Jonathan Raban, The Strange Last Voyage of Donald Crowhurst, McGraw Hill Contemporary, New York, ...

Author: Vessantara

Publisher: Windhorse Publications

ISBN: 9781909314962

Category: Religion

Page: 216

View: 297

Drawn from the rich variety of the Buddhist tradition, the stories convey a sense of inner freedom. We see ordinary people liberate themselves from anger and grief, and great teachers remain free even in the face of death. Vessantara's commentary shows us how we can move towards that freedom in our own lives. Stories have the power to transform us as we enter their world. The wisdom of these beautifully told stories can teach us how to break out of our self-imposed mental prisons - and roam free.
Categories: Religion