The Social Media Revolution: An Economic Encyclopedia of Friending, Following, Texting, and Connecting

An Economic Encyclopedia of Friending, Following, Texting, and Connecting

Author: Jarice Hanson

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 1610697685

Category: Social Science

Page: 441

View: 8965

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Social media shapes the ways in which we communicate, think about friends, and hear about news and current events. It also affects how users think of themselves, their communities, and their place in the world. This book examines the tremendous impact of social media on daily life. • Provides an insightful perspective on the past and future that demonstrates how the technologies of communication serve to create the nexus of social interaction • Examines the fundamental need and desire of humanity to communicate, which in turn determines what we think of ourselves, how we see the world, and how we make meaning • Focuses on social media as a powerful tool, not only for communication and entertainment but also for potentially equalizing power and social mobility locally, nationally, and globally • Considers the financial impact of social media as it challenges legacy media for consumers, users, and audiences
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The Digitizing Family

An Ethnography of Melanesian Smartphones

Author: Geoffrey Hobbis

Publisher: Springer Nature

ISBN: 3030349292

Category:

Page: N.A

View: 1647

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The Autonomous Revolution

Reclaiming the Future We’ve Sold to Machines

Author: William Davidow,Michael Malone

Publisher: Berrett-Koehler Publishers

ISBN: 1523087633

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 240

View: 4067

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The coauthors of the seminal book The Virtual Corporation describe how the rise of artificial intelligence and virtual environments are ushering in an epic cultural transformation—and how we can thrive in this new era. We are at the dawn of the Autonomous Revolution, a turning point in human history as decisive as the Agricultural and Industrial Revolutions. More and more, AI-based machines are replacing human beings, and online environments are gathering our data and using it to manipulate us. This loss of human autonomy amounts to nothing less than a societal phase change, a fundamental paradigm shift. The same institutions will remain—schools, banks, churches, and corporations—but they will radically change form, obey new rules, and use new tools. William H. Davidow and Michael S. Malone go deeply into the enormous implications of these developments. They show why increases in productivity no longer translate into increases in the GDP and how zero cost, one-to-many communications have been turned into tools for cybercrime and propaganda. Many of the book's recommendations—such as using taxes to control irresponsible internet behavior and enabling people to put their data into what are essentially virtual personal information “safety deposit boxes”—are bold and visionary, but we must figure out how we will deal with these emerging challenges now, before the Autonomous Revolution overcomes us.
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Streaming Music

Practices, Media, Cultures

Author: Sofia Johansson,Ann Werner,Patrik Åker,Greg Goldenzwaig

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1351801988

Category: Social Science

Page: 180

View: 6561

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Streaming Music examines how the Internet has become integrated in contemporary music use, by focusing on streaming as a practice and a technology for music consumption. The backdrop to this enquiry is the digitization of society and culture, where the music industry has undergone profound disruptions, and where music streaming has altered listening modes and meanings of music in everyday life. The objective of Streaming Music is to shed light on what these transformations mean for listeners, by looking at their adaptation in specific cultural contexts, but also by considering how online music platforms and streaming services guide music listeners in specific ways. Drawing on case studies from Moscow and Stockholm, and providing analysis of Spotify, VK and YouTube as popular but distinct sites for music, Streaming Music discusses, through a qualitative, cross-cultural, study, questions around music and value, music sharing, modes of engaging with music, and the way that contemporary music listening is increasingly part of mobile, automated and computational processes. Offering a nuanced perspective on these issues, it adds to research about music and digital media, shedding new light on music cultures as they appear today. As such, this volume will appeal to scholars of media, sociology and music with interests in digital technologies.
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