The Skin That We Speak

Thoughts on Language and Culture in the Classroom

Author: Lisa Delpit,Joanne Kilgore Dowdy

Publisher: New Press/ORIM

ISBN: 1595585842

Category: Education

Page: 256

View: 2243

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“Lucid, accessible” research on classroom language bias for educators and “parents concerned about questions of power and control in public schools” (Publishers Weekly). In this collection of twelve essays, MacArthur Fellow Lisa Delpit and Kent State University Associate Professor Joanne Kilgour Dowdy take a critical look at the issues of language and dialect in the education system. The Skin That We Speak moves beyond the highly charged war of idioms to present teachers and parents with a thoughtful exploration of the varieties of English spoken today. At a time when children who don’t speak formal English are written off in our schools, and when the class- and race-biased language used to describe those children determines their fate, The Skin That We Speak offers a cutting-edge look at this all-important aspect of education. Including groundbreaking work by Herbert Kohl, Gloria J. Ladson-Billings, and Victoria Purcell-Gates, as well as classic texts by Geneva Smitherman and Asa Hilliard, this volume of writing is what Black Issues Book Review calls “an essential text.” “The book is aimed at helping educators learn to make use of cultural differences apparent in language to educate children, but its content guarantees broader appeal.” —Booklist “An honest, much-needed look at one of the most crucial issues in education today.” —Jackson Advocate
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Voice in Qualitative Inquiry

Challenging conventional, interpretive, and critical conceptions in qualitative research

Author: Alecia Y Jackson,Lisa A Mazzei

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134107900

Category: Education

Page: 264

View: 3788

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Voice in Qualitative Inquiry is a critical response to conventional, interpretive, and critical conceptions of voice in qualitative inquiry. A select group of contributors focus collectively on the question, "What does it mean to work the limits of voice?" from theoretical, methodological, and interpretative positions, and the result is an innovative challenge to traditional notions of voice. The thought-provoking book will shift qualitative inquiry away from uproblematically engaging in practices and interpretations that limit what "counts" as voice and therefore data. The loss and betrayal of comfort and authority when qualitative researchers work the limits of voice will lead to new disruptions and irruptions in making meaning from data and, in turn, will add inventive and critical dialogue to the conversation about voice in qualitative inquiry. Toward this end, the book will specifically address the following objectives: To promote an examination of how voice functions to communicate in qualitative research To expose the excesses and instabilities of voice in qualitative research To present theoretical, methodological, and interpretative implications that result in a problematizing of voice To provide working examples of how qualitative methodologists are engaging the multiple layers of voice and meaning To deconstruct the epistemological limits of voice that circumscribe our view of the world and the ways in which we make meaning as researchers This compelling collection will challenge those who conduct qualitative inquiry to think differently about how they collect, analyze, and represent meaning using the voices of others, as well as their own.
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Everyday Antiracism

Getting Real About Race in School

Author: Mica Pollock

Publisher: The New Press

ISBN: 1595585672

Category: Education

Page: 416

View: 2674

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Which acts by educators are “racist” and which are “antiracist”? How can an educator constructively discuss complex issues of race with students and colleagues? In Everyday Antiracism leading educators deal with the most challenging questions about race in school, offering invaluable and effective advice. Contributors including Beverly Daniel Tatum, Sonia Nieto, and Pedro Noguera describe concrete ways to analyze classroom interactions that may or may not be “racial,” deal with racial inequality and “diversity,” and teach to high standards across racial lines. Topics range from using racial incidents as teachable moments and responding to the “n-word” to valuing students’ home worlds, dealing daily with achievement gaps, and helping parents fight ethnic and racial misconceptions about their children. Questions following each essay prompt readers to examine and discuss everyday issues of race and opportunity in their own classrooms and schools. For educators and parents determined to move beyond frustrations about race, Everyday Antiracism is an essential tool.
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Fires in the Bathroom

Advice for Teachers from High School Students

Author: Kathleen Cushman

Publisher: The New Press

ISBN: 1595585702

Category: Education

Page: 204

View: 3701

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Since its initial publication in hardcover in 2003, Fires in the Bathroom has been through multiple printings and received the attention of teachers across the country. Now in paperback, Kathleen Cushman’s groundbreaking book offers original insights into teaching teenagers in today’s hard-pressed urban high schools from the point of view of the students themselves. It speaks to both new and established teachers, giving them firsthand information about who their students are and what they need to succeed. Students from across the country contributed perceptive and pragmatic answers to questions of how teachers can transcend the barriers of adolescent identity and culture to reach the diverse student body in today’s urban schools. With the fresh and often surprising perspectives of youth, they tackle tough issues such as increasing engagement and motivation, teaching difficult academic material, reaching English-language learners, and creating a classroom culture where respect and success go hand in hand.
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Understanding English Language Variation in U.S. Schools

Author: Anne H. Charity Hudley,Christine Mallinson

Publisher: Teachers College Press

ISBN: 0807774022

Category: Education

Page: 193

View: 1381

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In today’s culturally diverse classrooms, students possess and use many culturally, ethnically, and regionally diverse English language varieties that may differ from standardized English. This book helps classroom teachers become attuned to these differences and offers practical strategies to support student achievement while fostering positive language attitudes in classrooms and beyond. The text contrasts standardized varieties of English with Southern, Appalachian, and African American English varieties, focusing on issues that are of everyday concern to those who are assessing the linguistic competence of students. Featuring a narrative style with teaching strategies and discussion questions, this practical resource: Provides a clear, introductory explanation of what is meant by non-standard English, from both linguistic and educational viewpoints. Emphasizes what educators needs to know about language variation in and outside of the classroom. Addresses the social factors accompanying English language variation and how those factors interact in real classrooms. “A landmark book. . . . It guides linguists and educators as we all work to apply our knowledge on behalf of those for whom it matters most: students.” —From the Afterword by Walt Wolfram, North Carolina State University “In the ongoing debate about language we typically hear arguments about what students say and/or how they say it. Finally, a volume that takes on the ‘elephant in the parlor’—WHO is saying it. By laying bare the complicated issues of race, culture, region, and ethnicity, Charity Hudley and Mallinson provide a scholarly significant and practically relevant text for scholars and practitioners alike. This is bound to be an important contribution to the literature.” —Gloria Ladson-Billings, University of Wisconsin–Madison “An invaluable guide for teachers, graduate students, and all lovers of language. The authors provide a comprehensive and fascinating account of Southern and African American English, showing how it differs from standardized English, how those differences affect children in the classroom, and how teachers can use these insights to better serve their students.” —Deborah Tannen, University Professor and professor of linguistics, Georgetown University

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We Do Language

English Language Variation in the Secondary English Classroom

Author: Anne H. Charity-Hudley,Christine Mallinson

Publisher: Teachers College Press

ISBN: 0807772518

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 160

View: 5885

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We Do Language builds on the authors’ highly acclaimed first collaboration, Understanding English Language Variation in U.S. Schools, and examines the need to integrate linguistically informed teaching into the secondary English classroom. The book meets three critical goals for preparing English educators to ensure the academic success of their students. First, the book helps educators acquire a greater knowledge of language variation so they may teach their students to analyze the social, cultural, and linguistic dimensions of the texts they read in class. Second, the chapters provide specific information about language varieties that students bring with them to school so that educators can better assist students in developing the literacy skills necessary for the Common Core State Standards. Third, the text empowers educators to build their linguistic awareness so they may more fully understand, respect, and meet the needs of culturally and linguistically diverse students. We Do Language features concrete strategies, models, and vignettes, as well as classroom materials developed by English educators for English educators. It is essential reading for anyone interested in learning about the role that language plays in the experiences of students, both in secondary and postsecondary environments. “Full of advice and support for walking hand-in-hand with students into imaginative ways of understanding the realities of language variation, this book is pure joy for teachers and college counselors. Even more important is the guarantee that when these educators embrace the humanity and philosophy so touchingly illustrated by the authors, the intrigue of thinking deeply about speaking, writing, and reading is sure to follow for students.” —Shirley Brice Heath, Margery Bailey Professor of English & Dramatic Literature and Professor of Linguistics, Emerita, Stanford University “We Do Language is an enabling tool for helping teachers and those who prepare them to face—perhaps better than we ever have—the challenge of schooling in the English/language arts for the 21st century.” —From the Foreword by Jacqueline Jones Royster, Ivan Allen Chair in Liberal Arts and Technology and Dean, Ivan Allen College of Liberal Arts, Georgia Institute of Technology “Long overdue and much needed. African American English is here to stay, and this book affirms and supports educators and African American students, their language, and their culture. I can't thank the authors enough for writing this powerful, thought provoking, and critical analysis of language variation.” —Donna Ford, Harvie Branscomb Distinguished Professor of Special Education and Teaching and Learning, Peabody College of Education, Vanderbilt University Anne H. Charity Hudley is associate professor of education, English, linguistics, and Africana studies at the College of William & Mary in Williamsburg, Virginia. Christine Mallinson is associate professor in the Language, Literacy, and Culture Program and affiliate associate professor in the Gender and Women’s Studies Program at the University of Maryland-Baltimore County (UMBC).
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Multicultural Teaching in the Early Childhood Classroom

Approaches, Strategies and Tools, Preschool-2nd Grade

Author: Mariana Souto-Manning

Publisher: Teachers College Press

ISBN: 0807771457

Category: Education

Page: 169

View: 1456

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This unique book features an array of approaches, strategies, and tools for teaching multiculturally in the early years. The teachers and classrooms portrayed here provide young children with rich educational experiences that empower them to understand themselves in relation to others. You will see how amazing teachers engage in culturally responsive teaching that fosters educational equity while also meeting state and national standards (such as the Common Core State Standards). This engaging book is sprinkled with questions for reflection and implementation that encourage educators to start planning ways of enhancing their own teaching, making their early childhood setting a more equitable learning space. Book Features: Multicultural education in action,including the everyday issues and tensions experienced by children and their families. Powerful vignettes from diverse Head Start, preschool, kindergarten, 1st- and 2nd-grade classrooms throughout the United States. Sections on “Getting Started” and “Considering Obstacles and Exploring Possibilities” in each chapter. A list of multicultural children’s books and resources for further reading. Chapters: Multicultural Tools and Strategies for Teaching Young Children Multicultural Education as Transformative Education Interviews: Encouraging Children to Ask Questions Critical Inquiry: Supporting Children’s Investigations Culture Circles with Multicultural Literature: Addressing Issues of Fairness Community Resources and Home Literacies: Developing Funds of Knowledge Technology: Media(ting) Multicultural Teaching Storytelling and Story Acting: Creating Spaces for Children to Negotiate Change Reflecting on the Possibilities of Teaching Multiculturally: What Next? What If? Mariana Souto-Manning is Associate Professor of Education in the Department of Curriculum and Teaching at Teachers College, Columbia University. “A profound, rich, and rewarding meditation and deep conversation with teachers fully engaging young children with culture, social history, and learning for the future. This wide-ranging book escapes temporal, spatial, and disciplinary boundaries. Read it and reflect on how you can take it into your own life of learning.” —Shirley Brice Heath, Professor Emerita, Stanford University “Early childhood educators will experience this unique book as a warm and detailed invitation to engage in multicultural education. The emphasis throughout is on “multi”—multiple pedagogical approaches, from culture circles to podcasts to story acting, and multiple cultural heritages embodied by active children and teachers. From a critical perspective and alongside creative teachers who aspire to be transformative, Souto-Manning links accessible theory with rich and thoughtful practices.” —Celia Genishi, Professor of Education, Teachers College, Columbia University “Mariana Souto-Manning’s Multicultural Teaching in the Early Childhood Classroom rightly places the use of deficit thinking and ineffective teaching strategies in the wasteland of classroom instruction. The author superbly documents and explains ways of teaching multiculturally that will richly benefit the learning of all students and make teaching become the fun that teachers dreamed it would be when they first said, ‘I want to teach because I love kids.’” —Carl A. Grant, Hoefs-Bascom Professor, University of Wisconsin-Madison “Multicultural Teaching in the Early Childhood Classroom encourages teachers to honor, affirm, and challenge even our very youngest children to think inclusively, critically, and democratically—a necessity if we are to help develop knowledgeable, caring, and empowered learners.” —Sonia Nieto, Professor Emerita, University of Massachusetts, Amherst
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Through ebony eyes

what teachers need to know but are afraid to ask about African American students

Author: Gail L. Thompson

Publisher: Jossey-Bass Inc Pub

ISBN: 9780787970611

Category: Education

Page: 328

View: 775

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Fifty years after the Brown v. Board of Education decision was handed down from the Supreme Court, schools are still grappling with issues pertaining to race, ethnicity, diversity, and multiculturalism. In this book, Gail L. Thompson takes on the volatile topic of the role of race in education and explores the black-white achievement gap and the cultural divide that exists between some teachers and African American students. Solidly based on research conducted with 175 educators, Through Ebony Eyes provides information and strategies that will help teachers increase their effectiveness with African American students. Written in conversational language, Through Ebony Eyes offers a wealth of examples and personal stories that clearly demonstrate the cultural differences that exist in the schools and offers a three-part, long-term professional development plan that will help teachers become more effective. Through Ebony Eyes tackles real-life problems in schools and explains why some African American students misbehave in class and how teachers often unwittingly contribute to their misbehavior. Examples from a variety of classrooms and Thompson's own personal story of transformation clearly show how it is possible for a teacher to reach African American students and what it takes to become a powerful and influential life-changing teacher. Through Ebony Eyes revisits the controversial topic of whether or not teachers should force African American students to speak Standard English in class and includes recommendations on motivating African American students to acquire Standard English skills without silencing them or devaluing their "home" language. The book offers practical advice on whether teachers should allow African American students to call each other the "N" word and offers suggestions on how to handle students' accusations of racism. This important resource offers teachers, administrators, and student-teachers much-needed guidance for closing the cultural gap and providing sensitive but rigorous and effective educational experiences for their African American students.
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Teaching About Dialect Variations and Language in Secondary English Classrooms

Power, Prestige, and Prejudice

Author: Michelle D. Devereaux

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1136675191

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 176

View: 5550

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Standardized tests demand Standard English, but secondary students (grades 6-12) come to school speaking a variety of dialects and languages, thus creating a conflict between students’ language of nurture and the expectations of school. The purpose of this text is twofold: to explain and illustrate how language varieties function in the classroom and in students’ lives and to detail linguistically informed instructional strategies. Through anecdotes from the classroom, lesson plans, and accessible narrative, it introduces theory and clearly builds the bridge to daily classroom practices that respect students’ language varieties and use those varieties as strengths upon which secondary English teachers can build. The book explains how to teach about language variations and ideologies in the classroom; uses typically taught texts as models for exploring how power, society, and identity interact with language, literature, and students’ lives; connects the Common Core State Standards to the concepts presented; and offers strategies to teach the sense and structure of Standard English and other language variations, so that all students may add Standard English to their linguistic toolboxes.
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