The Shabbes Goy

The  Shabbes Goy

Katz affords the shabbes goy the central role in this fascinating case study on the larger question of the adapatability of halakhah to the ever-changing circumstances of life.

Author: Jacob Katz

Publisher: Jewish Publication Society of America

ISBN: UOM:39015015127387

Category: HISTORY

Page: 253

View: 552

From the Babylonian period to the twentieth century, strictly observant Jews have depended on a non-Jew, or shabbes goy to perform work that was forbidden on the Sabbath. The author traces the role of the shabbes goy through the centuries. Katz affords the shabbes goy the central role in this fascinating case study on the larger question of the adapatability of halakhah to the ever-changing circumstances of life.
Categories: HISTORY

The Shabbat Elevator and other Sabbath Subterfuges

The Shabbat Elevator and other Sabbath Subterfuges

There are literally hundreds if not thousands of books written about Judaism and Jews, but this book is unlike any previously published.

Author: Alan Dundes

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers

ISBN: 9781461645603

Category: Social Science

Page: 208

View: 143

There are literally hundreds if not thousands of books written about Judaism and Jews, but this book is unlike any previously published. It focuses on the topic of 'circumventing custom' with special emphasis on the ingenious ways Orthodox (and other) Jews have devised to avoid breaking the extensive list of activities forbidden on the Sabbath. After examining the sources of Sabbath observance as set forth in the Old Testament, the New Testament, and rabbinical writings, some of the most salient forms of circumvention are described. These include: riding a special Shabbat elevator, unscrewing the lightbulb in the refrigerator, constructing an eruv (a space extending one's domicile so that objects may be carried outside the home), and relying on the services of the so-called 'Shabbes Goy,' among others. Dundes respectfully analyzes such facets of Jewish characteristics as an undue concern with purity, and a long-established tradition of indulging in nit-picking and argumentation. The resultant picture of Jewish character is drawn from an unusual mixture of religious written texts and oral tradition (jokes and proverbs). The sources range from ancient Israel to works from the twenty-first century. In many ways, it is an authentic and striking Jewish self-portrait that is painted for the very first time in this fascinating volume.
Categories: Social Science

Shabbes Goy

Shabbes Goy

Author: Ted Schmidt

Publisher:

ISBN: 0973050500

Category: Catholics

Page: 309

View: 964

Categories: Catholics

The I L Peretz Reader

The I  L  Peretz Reader

These short works from a master of Jewish literature offer “a brilliantly evocative tribute to a bygone era” (Publishers Weekly). Isaac Leybush Peretz is one of the most influential figures of modern Jewish culture.

Author: I. L. Peretz

Publisher: Open Road Media

ISBN: 9781480440784

Category: Fiction

Page: 496

View: 894

These short works from a master of Jewish literature offer “a brilliantly evocative tribute to a bygone era” (Publishers Weekly). Isaac Leybush Peretz is one of the most influential figures of modern Jewish culture. Born in Poland and dedicated to Yiddish culture, he recognized that Jews needed to adapt to their times while preserving their cultural heritage, and his captivating and beautiful writings explore the complexities inherent in the struggle between tradition and the desire for progress. This book, which presents a memoir, poem, travelogue, and twenty-six stories by Peretz, also provides a detailed essay about Peretz’s life by Ruth R. Wisse. This edition of the book includes, as well, Peretz’s great visionary drama A Night in the Old Marketplace, in a rhymed, performable translation by Hillel Halkin.
Categories: Fiction

How the Wise Men Got to Chelm

How the Wise Men Got to Chelm

Yankele keeps his mouth shut as instructed, but before he knows it, the Shabbes goy has crept up on him in the street, knocked him unconscious, ...

Author: Ruth von Bernuth

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 9781479886654

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 336

View: 491

How the Wise Men Got to Chelm is the first in-depth study of Chelm literature and its relationship to its literary precursors. When God created the world, so it is said, he sent out an angel with a bag of foolish souls with instructions to distribute them equally all over the world—one fool per town. But the angel’s bag broke and all the souls spilled out onto the same spot. They built a settlement where they landed: the town is known as Chelm. The collected tales of these fools, or “wise men,” of Chelm constitute the best-known folktale tradition of the Jews of eastern Europe. This tradition includes a sprawling repertoire of stories about the alleged intellectual limitations of the members of this old and important Jewish community. Chelm did not make its debut in the role of the foolish shtetl par excellence until late in the nineteenth century. Since then, however, the town has led a double life—as a real city in eastern Poland and as an imaginary place onto which questions of Jewish identity, community, and history have been projected. By placing literary Chelm and its “foolish” antecedents in a broader historical context, it shows how they have functioned for over three hundred years as models of society, somewhere between utopia and dystopia. These imaginary foolish towns have enabled writers both to entertain and highlight a variety of societal problems, a function that literary Chelm continues to fulfill in Jewish literature to this day.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Anna s Shtetl

Anna s Shtetl

For a small fee, a shabbes goy lit or blew out candles, turned off the oil lamp that had burned all night, built a new ¤re in the heating unit, ...

Author: Lawrence A. Coben

Publisher: University of Alabama Press

ISBN: 9780817356736

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 263

View: 527

A rare view of a childhood in a European ghetto. Anna Spector was born in 1905 in Korsun, a Ukrainian town on the Ros River, eighty miles south of Kiev. Held by Poland until 1768 and annexed by the Tsar in 1793 Korsun and its fluid ethnic population were characteristic of the Pale of Settlement in Eastern Europe: comprised of Ukrainians, Cossacks, Jews and other groups living uneasily together in relationships punctuated by violence. Anna’s father left Korsun in 1912 to immigrate to America, and Anna left in 1919, having lived through the Great War, the Bolshevik Revolution, and part of the ensuing civil war, as well as several episodes of more or less organized pogroms—deadly anti-Jewish riots begun by various invading military detachments during the Russian Civil War and joined by some of Korsun’s peasants. In the early 1990s Anna met Lawrence A. Coben, a medical doctor seeking information about the shtetls to recapture a sense of his own heritage. Anna had near-perfect recall of her daily life as a girl and young woman in the last days in one of those historic but doomed communities. Her rare account, the product of some 300 interviews, is valuable because most personal memoirs of ghetto life are written by men. Also, very often, Christian neighbors appear in ghetto accounts as a stolid peasant mass assembled on market days, as destructive mobs, or as an arrogant and distant collection of government officials and nobility. Anna’s story is exceptionally rich in a sense of the Korsun Christians as friends, neighbors, and individuals. Although the Jewish communities in Eastern Europe are now virtually gone, less than 100 years ago they counted a population of millions. The firsthand records we have from that lost world are therefore important, and this view from the underrecorded lives of women and the young is particularly welcome.
Categories: Biography & Autobiography

New York Magazine

New York Magazine

... shabbes goy, a Gentile who performs mmm ••• simple acts — lighting a stove, flipping an electrical switch — forbidden to observant Jews on the Sabbath.

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 204

View: 768

New York magazine was born in 1968 after a run as an insert of the New York Herald Tribune and quickly made a place for itself as the trusted resource for readers across the country. With award-winning writing and photography covering everything from politics and food to theater and fashion, the magazine's consistent mission has been to reflect back to its audience the energy and excitement of the city itself, while celebrating New York as both a place and an idea.
Categories:

Laws of Shabbat

Laws of Shabbat

Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online.

Author: Source Wikipedia

Publisher: University-Press.org

ISBN: 1230514473

Category:

Page: 28

View: 856

Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 27. Chapters: Electricity on Shabbat in Jewish law, Activities prohibited on Shabbat, Eruv, Driving on Shabbat in Jewish law, Cooking on Shabbat, Shabbat elevator, Shabbos goy, Yad soledet bo, Blech, Shabbat lamp, Muktzah, Shabbat candles, Rabbinically prohibited activities of Shabbat, Eruv techumin. Excerpt: Many Jews who observe Shabbat (the Sabbath), especially within Orthodox Judaism, have the practice of refraining from turning electricity on or off during Shabbat. In most cases they also abstain from making adjustments to the intensity of an electrical appliance as well. Authorities of Jewish law have disagreed about the basis of this prohibition since the early 20th century. Turning on an incandescent light bulb violates the Biblical prohibition against igniting a fire (Hebrew:, hav'arah) according to a nearly unanimous consensus of authorities. However, the reasons for prohibiting the operation of an electrical appliance that does not produce light or heat, such as a fan, are not agreed upon. At least six substantive reasons have been suggested, and a minority believe that turning on an electrical fan is prohibited only because of common Jewish practice and tradition (minhag) but not for any substantive technical reason. Although directly operating electrical appliances is prohibited, several indirect methods are permitted according to some or all authorities. For example, Jews may program a Shabbat clock on a timer before Shabbat to operate a light or appliance on Shabbat, and in some cases they may adjust the timer on Shabbat. Unintentional activation of an electrical appliance may be permitted if the activation is not certain to occur or if the person does not benefit from the automatic operation of the appliance. For example, most authorities permit Jews to open a refrigerator door even though it will...
Categories:

REMEMBER OBSERVE REJOICE

REMEMBER  OBSERVE  REJOICE

A Shabbos goy (Yiddish) or in Hebrew, goy shel Shabbat is a non-Jew who performs certain types of work for a Jew on the Shabbat which according to Jewish ...

Author: Petra van der Zande

Publisher: Lulu.com

ISBN: 9789657542675

Category:

Page:

View: 272

Categories:

CCAR Journal

CCAR Journal

See also : Goy Shel Shabbat ( Jerusalem : Merkaz Shazar , 1984 ) / The " Shabbes Goy " ( Philadelphia : JPS , 1989 ) ; Exclusiveness and Tolerance ( New ...

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN: UVA:X002509672

Category: Reform Judaism

Page:

View: 667

Categories: Reform Judaism

Settings of Silver

Settings of Silver

We might consider the example of the Shabbes goy, a common institution in Eastern Europe. The Shabbes goy was a Gentile who came to a Jewish home on Friday ...

Author: Stephen M. Wylen

Publisher: Paulist Press

ISBN: 9781616434984

Category: RELIGION

Page: 300

View: 739

Provides a comprehensive and easy to understand overview of Judaism as the belief system and way of life of the Jewish people.
Categories: RELIGION

Memoirs of a Grandmother

Memoirs of a Grandmother

Nonetheless, the institution was ubiquitous in traditional Jewish society; see Jacob Katz, The 'Shabbes Goy': A Study in Halakhic Flexibility (Philadelphia: ...

Author: Pauline Wengeroff

Publisher: Stanford University Press

ISBN: 9780804790710

Category: History

Page: 240

View: 188

Pauline Wengeroff's Memoirs of a Grandmother offers a unique first-person window into traditionalism, modernity, and the tensions linking the two in nineteenth-century Russia. Wengeroff (1833–1916), a perceptive, highly literate social observer, tells a gripping tale of cultural transformation, situating her narrative in the experience of women and families. In Volume Two, Wengeroff claims that Jewish women were capable and desirous of adopting the best of European modernity but were also wedded to tradition, while Jewish men recklessly abandoned tradition and forced their wives to do the same. The result was not only marital and intergenerational conflict but also catastrophic cultural loss, with women's inability to transmit tradition in the home leading to larger cultural drift. Two of Wengeroff's children converted when faced with anti-Jewish educational and professional discrimination, unwilling to sacrifice secular ambitions and visions for the sake of a traditional culture they did not know. Memoirs is a tale of loss but also of significant hope, which Wengeroff situates not in her children but in a new generation of Jewish youth reclaiming Jewish memory. To them, she addresses her Memoirs, giving an "orphaned youth"—orphaned of their past and culture—a "grandmother."
Categories: History

Goy

Goy

12 The notion of a goy used as a legal tool is developed in medieval halakhah. See Jacob Katz, The “Shabbes Goy”: A Study in Halakhic Flexibility, trans.

Author: Adi Ophir

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780192525666

Category: Religion

Page: 384

View: 205

Goy: Israel's Others and the Birth of the Gentile traces the development of the term and category of the goy from the Bible to rabbinic literature. Adi Ophir and Ishay Rosen-Zvi show that the category of the goy was born much later than scholars assume; in fact not before the first century CE. They explain that the abstract concept of the gentile first appeared in Paul's Letters. However, it was only in rabbinic literature that this category became the center of a stable and long standing structure that involved God, the Halakha, history, and salvation. The authors narrate this development through chronological analyses of the various biblical and post biblical texts (including the Dead Sea scrolls, the New Testament and early patristics, the Mishnah, and rabbinic Midrash) and synchronic analyses of several discursive structures. Looking at some of the goy's instantiations in contemporary Jewish culture in Israel and the United States, the study concludes with an examination of the extraordinary resilience of the Jew/goy division and asks how would Judaism look like without the gentile as its binary contrast.
Categories: Religion

The Secret Mitzvah of Lucio Burke

The Secret Mitzvah of Lucio Burke

"I'm the Shabbes goy,” said Lucio. "No kidding,” said Dubie, then smiled. “You know,” he said, “these shoes could use a polish.” Lucio agreed. "Well?

Author: Steven Hayward

Publisher: Vintage Canada

ISBN: 9780307369451

Category: Fiction

Page: 400

View: 584

The Secret Mitzvah of Lucio Burke is a hilarious and memorable first novel about youth and passion, family and community, miracles and violence and baseball. This moving love story, also a richly imagined chapter of Toronto history, begins on a summer afternoon in 1933, when Lucio Burke knocks a great ungainly bird out of the Toronto sky with a single perfect throw of a baseball. Thus it is that Lucio, a careful seventeen-year-old whose father died the night he was born, is drawn out of himself and into a complicated world.
Categories: Fiction

Shalom Baby

Shalom Baby

Fast-forward to the tale of a mixed-race couple in seemingly unprejudiced modern-day Brooklyn, where the same family is coping with a number of calamities. Shalom Baby is a touching and very funny exploration of love, family and friendship.

Author: Rikki Beadle-Blair

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781849436632

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 112

View: 963

In 1930s Berlin - an intriguing city of Jazz and overground cabaret overpowered by the rise of Hitler and World War II - the daughter of a Jewish family falls in love with their black shabbes goy (a term used for those who assist Jews on the Sabbath with tasks forbidden to Jews within Jewish law). Fast-forward to the tale of a mixed-race couple in seemingly unprejudiced modern-day Brooklyn, where the same family is coping with a number of calamities. Shalom Baby is a touching and very funny exploration of love, family and friendship.
Categories: Performing Arts

Selected Stories

Selected Stories

Contents: Berl the tailor -The magician -Thou shalt not covert -The hermit and the bean -If not higher -Three gifts -The Shabbes-goy -A pinch of snuff -Morl Prince -Bontsha the silent -Joy beyond measure -Between two peaks -Ne'ilah in ...

Author: Isaac Leib Peretz

Publisher: Schocken Books Incorporated

ISBN: UOM:39015012930130

Category: Jewish fiction

Page: 159

View: 174

Contents: Berl the tailor -The magician -Thou shalt not covert -The hermit and the bean -If not higher -Three gifts -The Shabbes-goy -A pinch of snuff -Morl Prince -Bontsha the silent -Joy beyond measure -Between two peaks -Ne'ilah in Gehenna -Devotion without end -A musician dies -Venus and Shulamith -The poor boy -Travel pictures.
Categories: Jewish fiction

Picturing Yiddish

Picturing Yiddish

Since he lights a candle during services, he may be identified as a Shabbes goy, a Christian who works for Jews on their Sabbath, when they are forbidden to ...

Author: Diane Wolfthal

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9789004139053

Category: Travel

Page: 283

View: 884

This is the first comprehensive study of the images in five profusely illustrated Yiddish books from sixteenth-century Italy: a manuscript of Jewish customs, and four printed volumes - two books of customs, a chivalric romance, and a book of fables.
Categories: Travel

Halakhah

Halakhah

The traditional response was to delegate such matters to a non-Jew (known as a shabbesgoy) expressly engaged to deal with whatever Shabbat violations became ...

Author: Chaim N. Saiman

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9780691184364

Category: Religion

Page: 320

View: 358

How the rabbis of the Talmud transformed everything into a legal question—and Jewish law into a way of thinking and talking about everything Though typically translated as “Jewish law,” the term halakhah is not an easy match for what is usually thought of as law. This is because the rabbinic legal system has rarely wielded the political power to enforce its many detailed rules, nor has it ever been the law of any state. Even more idiosyncratically, the talmudic rabbis claim that the study of halakhah is a holy endeavor that brings a person closer to God—a claim no country makes of its law. In this panoramic book, Chaim Saiman traces how generations of rabbis have used concepts forged in talmudic disputation to do the work that other societies assign not only to philosophy, political theory, theology, and ethics but also to art, drama, and literature. In the multifaceted world of halakhah where everything is law, law is also everything, and even laws that serve no practical purpose can, when properly studied, provide surprising insights into timeless questions about the very nature of human existence. What does it mean for legal analysis to connect humans to God? Can spiritual teachings remain meaningful and at the same time rigidly codified? Can a modern state be governed by such law? Guiding readers across two millennia of richly illuminating perspectives, this book shows how halakhah is not just “law” but an entire way of thinking, being, and knowing.
Categories: Religion

Reconstructing Ashkenaz

Reconstructing Ashkenaz

Katz notes the phenomenon in his study of the “Shabbes Goy,” the timehonored practice of having a non-Jew perform for a Jew on the Sabbath a task that would ...

Author: David Malkiel

Publisher: Stanford University Press

ISBN: 9780804786843

Category: Religion

Page: 376

View: 467

Reconstructing Ashkenaz shows that, contrary to traditional accounts, the Jews of Western Europe in the High Middle Ages were not a society of saints and martyrs. David Malkiel offers provocative revisions of commonly held interpretations of Jewish martyrdom in the First Crusade massacres, the level of obedience to rabbinic authority, and relations with apostates and with Christians. In the process, he also reexamines and radically revises the view that Ashkenazic Jewry was more pious than its Sephardic counterpart.
Categories: Religion

Special Sorrows

Special Sorrows

The Shabbes - Goy , " in I. L. Peretz , Selected Stories , Irving Howe and Eliezer Greenberg , eds . ( New York : Schocken , 1974 ) , p .

Author: Matthew Frye Jacobson

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520233425

Category: History

Page: 327

View: 933

"Jacobson's book impressively lives up to its stark and splendid title, which is borrowed from Polish-Jewish revolutionary Rosa Luxemburg's capsule description of the bonds uniting people into nations. For the immigrants whom Jacobson considers, nationalist sorrows seemed especially tragic, as they were felt and resisted in exile from the nations whose causes were being championed. Special Sorrows carefully delineates the centrality of Jewish, Polish and Irish supporters in the United States to national liberation movements abroad and, as expertly, details how such movements shaped immigrant life in the United States."—David Roediger, from the Foreword
Categories: History