Anthropology and the Cognitive Challenge

Anthropology and the Cognitive Challenge

Within the scope of this book, legendary computer guru James Martin and co-authors Kathleen Kavanaugh Chapman and Joe Leben provide an in-depth exploration of ATM, emphasizing its critical role in the future of communication network ...

Author: Maurice Bloch

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521006156

Category: History

Page: 245

View: 139

One of the world's most distinguished anthropologists proposes that cognitive science enriches, rather than threatens, the work of social scientists.
Categories: History

Anthropology and Science

Anthropology and Science

This book reflects on the relation between anthropology and the sciences. This relation is peculiarly striking in the sites where anthropological and scientific knowledge are made. Ethnographers of science treat laboratories as the ...

Author: Jeanette Edwards

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781000323672

Category: Social Science

Page: 220

View: 757

What does it mean to know something - scientifically, anthropologically, socially? What is the relationship between different forms of knowledge and ways of knowing? How is knowledge mobilised in society and to what ends? Drawing on ethnographic examples from across the world, and from the virtual and global 'places' created by new information technologies, Anthropology and Science presents examples of living and dynamic epistemologies and practices, and of how scientific ways of knowing operate in the world. Authors address the nature of both scientific and experiential knowledge, and look at competing and alternative ideas about what it means to be human. The essays analyze the politics and ethics of positioning 'science', 'culture' or 'society' as authoritative. They explore how certain modes of knowing are made authoritative and command allegiance (or not), and look at scientific and other rationalities - whether these challenge or are compatible with science.
Categories: Social Science

Reclaiming a Scientific Anthropology

Reclaiming a Scientific Anthropology

This second edition of Reclaiming a Scientific Anthropology arrives at just the right time, as new advances in science increasingly affect anthropologists of all stripes.

Author: Lawrence A. Kuznar

Publisher: AltaMira Press

ISBN: 9780759112346

Category: Social Science

Page: 265

View: 421

This second edition of Reclaiming a Scientific Anthropology arrives at just the right time, as new advances in science increasingly affect anthropologists of all stripes. Lawrence Kuznar begins by reviewing the basic issues of scientific epistemology in anthropology as they have taken shape over the life of the discipline. He then describes postmodern and other critiques of both science and scientific anthropology, and he concludes with stringent analyses of these debates. This new edition brings this important text firmly into the 21st century; it not only updates the scholarly debates but it describes new research techniques—such as computer modeling systems—that could not have been imagined just a decade ago. In a field that has become increasingly divided over basic methods of reasearch and interpretation, Kuznar makes a powerful argument that anthropology should return to its roots in empirical science.
Categories: Social Science

Anthropology and Science

Anthropology and Science

Publisher description

Author: Jeanette Edwards

Publisher: Berg Pub Limited

ISBN: UOM:39015073938543

Category: Science

Page: 230

View: 185

Publisher description
Categories: Science

Cultural Anthropology

Cultural Anthropology

... This text is organized to answer a series of problems on which cultural anthropology is focused. Each problem area is stated.

Author: Felix Maxwell Keesing

Publisher: New York : Rinehart

ISBN: UOM:39015002244203

Category: Anthropology

Page: 477

View: 730

"Cultural anthropology presents the social science and humanities facets of anthropology, in contrast to its biological facet, physical anthropology. ... This text is organized to answer a series of problems on which cultural anthropology is focused. Each problem area is stated. After it is analyzed a critical discussion follows to make clear how the particular conclusion has been reached by anthropologists. The key anthropological thinkers on that particular problem are referred to, and case illustrations are given, particularly classic or critical cases from anthropological literature."--Foreword.
Categories: Anthropology

The Science of Man

The Science of Man

Author: Mischa Titiev

Publisher:

ISBN: UOM:39015002697327

Category: Anthropology

Page: 530

View: 819

Categories: Anthropology

Delimiting Anthropology

Delimiting Anthropology

Brown , a scientistic critic of Boasian culturalism , argued that there could never be a " science " of culture because culture ... of the non - Western cultures that were the traditional subject matter of ethnographic anthropology .

Author: George W. Stocking

Publisher: Univ of Wisconsin Press

ISBN: 0299174506

Category: Social Science

Page: 424

View: 103

"It is George Stocking, more than anyone else, who has made the history of anthropology available to us."--Daniel A. Segal, American Anthropologist
Categories: Social Science

Naked Science

Naked Science

While the volume rests on the assumption that science is not autonomous, the book is distinguished by its global perspective.

Author: Laura Nader

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781136667503

Category: Social Science

Page: 496

View: 324

Naked Science is about contested domains and includes different science cultures: physics, molecular biology, primatology, immunology, ecology, medical environmental, mathematical and navigational domains. While the volume rests on the assumption that science is not autonomous, the book is distinguished by its global perspective. Examining knowledge systems within a planetary frame forces thinking about boundaries that silence or affect knowledge-building. Consideration of ethnoscience and technoscience research within a common framework is overdue for raising questions about deeply held beliefs and assumptions we all carry about scientific knowledge. We need a perspective on how to regard different science traditions because public controversies should not be about a glorified science or a despicable science.
Categories: Social Science

Anthropological Futures

Anthropological Futures

In Anthropological Futures, Michael M. J. Fischer explores the uses of anthropology as a mode of philosophical inquiry, an evolving academic discipline, and a means for explicating the complex and shifting interweaving of human bonds and ...

Author: Michael M. J. Fischer

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 9780822390794

Category: Social Science

Page: 424

View: 161

In Anthropological Futures, Michael M. J. Fischer explores the uses of anthropology as a mode of philosophical inquiry, an evolving academic discipline, and a means for explicating the complex and shifting interweaving of human bonds and social interactions on a global level. Through linked essays, which are both speculative and experimental, Fischer seeks to break new ground for anthropology by illuminating the field’s broad analytical capacity and its attentiveness to emergent cultural systems. Fischer is particularly concerned with cultural anthropology’s interactions with science studies, and throughout the book he investigates how emerging knowledge formations in molecular biology, environmental studies, computer science, and bioengineering are transforming some of anthropology’s key concepts including nature, culture, personhood, and the body. In an essay on culture, he uses the science studies paradigm of “experimental systems” to consider how the social scientific notion of culture has evolved as an analytical tool since the nineteenth century. Charting anthropology’s role in understanding and analyzing the production of knowledge within the sciences since the 1990s, he highlights anthropology’s aptitude for tracing the transnational collaborations and multisited networks that constitute contemporary scientific practice. Fischer investigates changing ideas about cultural inscription on the human body in a world where genetic engineering, robotics, and cybernetics are constantly redefining our understanding of biology. In the final essay, Fischer turns to Kant’s philosophical anthropology to reassess the object of study for contemporary anthropology and to reassert the field’s primacy for answering the largest questions about human beings, societies, culture, and our interactions with the world around us. In Anthropological Futures, Fischer continues to advance what Clifford Geertz, in reviewing Fischer’s earlier book Emergent Forms of Life and the Anthropological Voice, called “a broad new agenda for cultural description and political critique.”
Categories: Social Science