The Rise of Magic in Early Medieval Europe

The Rise of Magic in Early Medieval Europe

"There are forces better recognized as belonging to human society than repressed or left to waste away or growl about upon its fringes." So writes Valerie Flint in this powerful work on magic in early medieval Europe.

Author: Valerie Irene Jane Flint

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9780691210025

Category: History

Page:

View: 158

"There are forces better recognized as belonging to human society than repressed or left to waste away or growl about upon its fringes." So writes Valerie Flint in this powerful work on magic in early medieval Europe. Flint shows how many of the more discerning leaders of the early medieval Church decided to promote non-Christian practices originally condemned as magical--rather than repressing them or leaving them to waste away or "growl." These wise leaders actively and enthusiastically incorporated specific kinds of "magic" into the dominant culture not only to appease the contemporary non-Christian opposition but also to enhance Christianity itself.
Categories: History

The Rise of Magic in Early Medieval Europe

The Rise of Magic in Early Medieval Europe

This is a study of magic in Western Europe in the early Middle Ages. Valerie Flint explores its practice and belief in Christian society, and examines the problems raised by so-called pagan survivals and superstition.

Author: Valerie I. J. Flint

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 0198205228

Category: Church history

Page: 452

View: 813

This is a study of magic in Western Europe in the early Middle Ages. Valerie Flint explores its practice and belief in Christian society, and examines the problems raised by so-called pagan survivals and superstition. She unravels the complex processes at work in the early medieval Christian church to show how the rejection of non-Christian magic came to be tempered by a more accommodating attitude: confrontation was replaced by negotiation, and certain practices previously condemned were not merely accepted, but actively encouraged. The forms of magic which were retained, as well as those the Church set out to obliterate, are analyzed. The superstitions condemned at the Reformation are shown to be, in origin, rational and intelligent concessions intended to reconcile coexisting cultures.
Categories: Church history

Unlocked Books

Unlocked Books

Manuscripts of Learned Magic in the Medieval Libraries of Central Europe Benedek Láng ... For a critical but helpful review on the book, see Brian Vickers, “On the Rise of Magic in Early Medieval Europe,” History of European Ideas 18 ...

Author: Benedek Láng

Publisher: Penn State Press

ISBN: 9780271048215

Category: History

Page: 334

View: 272

"Presents and analyzes texts of learned magic written in medieval Central Europe (Poland, Bohemia, and Hungary), and attempts to identify their authors, readers, and collectors"--Provided by publisher.
Categories: History

Witchcraft in Europe 400 1700

Witchcraft in Europe  400 1700

For the transition from late antiquity to eleventh - century Europe , see Valerie I. J. Flint , The Rise of Magic in Early Medieval Europe ( Princeton , 1991 ) , a controversial but consistently stimulating study , and Ramsay MacMullen ...

Author: Alan Kors

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 0812217519

Category: History

Page: 470

View: 261

A thoroughly revised, greatly expanded edition of the most important documentary history of European witchcraft ever published.
Categories: History

Magic and Superstition in Europe

Magic and Superstition in Europe

CHAPTER TWO The Rise of Christianity and Early Medieval Europe to the Year 1000 While Rome ruled the ancient West , accommodating within its cosmopolitan culture the many cultic rites and magical practices of the Mediterranean world ...

Author: Michael David Bailey

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 0742533875

Category: History

Page: 296

View: 519

The only comprehensive, single-volume survey of magic available, this compelling book traces the history of magic, witchcraft, and superstitious practices such as popular spells or charms from antiquity to the present day. Focusing especially on Europe in the medieval and early modern eras, Michael Bailey also explores the ancient Near East, classical Greece and Rome, and the spread of magical systems_particularly modern witchcraft or Wicca_from Europe to the United States. He examines how magic and superstition have been defined in various historical eras and how these constructions have changed over time. He considers the ways in which specific categories of magic have been condemned, and how those identified as magicians or witches have been persecuted and prosecuted in various societies. Although conceptions of magic have changed over time, the author shows how magic has almost always served as a boundary marker separating socially acceptable actions from illicit ones, and more generally the known and understood from the unknown and occult.
Categories: History

Christianization and Commonwealth in Early Medieval Europe

Christianization and Commonwealth in Early Medieval Europe

Flint, Valerie I.J. The Rise of Magic in Early Medieval Europe (Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1991). Foley, Michael P. “Rogationtide.” The Latin Mass 17, no. 2 (2008): pp. 36–9. Force, Paul. “L'place et signification de la ...

Author: Nathan J. Ristuccia

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780198810209

Category: Religion

Page: 312

View: 779

Christianization and Commonwealth in Early Medieval Europe re-examines the alterations in Western European life that followed widespread conversion to Christianity - the phenomena traditionally termed "Christianization". It refocuses scholarly paradigms for Christianization around thedevelopment of mandatory rituals. One prominent ritual, Rogationtide supplies an ideal case study demonstrating a new paradigm of "Christianization without religion." Christianization in the Middle Ages was not a slow process through which a Christian system of religious beliefs and practicesreplaced an earlier pagan system. In the Middle Ages, religion did not exist in the sense of a fixed system of belief bounded off from other spheres of life. Rather, Christianization was primarily ritual performance. Being a Christian meant joining a local church community. After the fall of Rome, mandatory rituals such as Rogationtide arose to separate a Christian commonwealth from the pagans, heretics, and Jews outside it. A Latin West between the polis and the parish had its own institution - the Rogation procession - for organizing local communities. For medievalpeople, sectarian borders were often flexible and rituals served to demarcate these borders. Rogationtide is an ideal case study of this demarcation, because it was an emotionally powerful feast, which combined pageantry with doctrinal instruction, community formation, social ranking, devotionalexercises, and bodily mortification. As a result, rival groups quarrelled over the holiday's meaning and procedure, sometimes violently, in order to reshape the local order and ban people and practices as non-Christian.
Categories: Religion

Astronomies and Cultures in Early Medieval Europe

Astronomies and Cultures in Early Medieval Europe

Viator , 16 ( 1985 ) : 108–127 . Explanatory Supplement to the Astronomical Ephemeris . . . . London : HMSO , 1961 . Flint , Valerie I. J. The Rise of Magic in Early Medieval Europe . Princeton : Princeton Univ . Pr . , 1991 .

Author: Stephen C. McCluskey

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521778522

Category: Science

Page: 235

View: 981

This book provides an overview of the astronomical practices that continued through the so-called "Dark Ages." Like the astronomies of traditional societies, early medieval astronomies established a religious framework of sacred time and ritual calender; here Christian feasts tied to a pre-Christian ritual solar calender, the date of Easter tied to the Hebrew lunar calender; and the timing of monastic prayers in terms of the course of the stars. Coupled with the remnants of ancient geometrical astronomy, these provided the framework for the rebirth of astronomy with the rise of the medieval universities.
Categories: Science

Communication Translation and Community in the Middle Ages and Early Modern Period

Communication  Translation  and Community in the Middle Ages and Early Modern Period

The notion existed in pre-modernity; furthermore, the distinction between magic and religion was not as obvious as the ... Valerie Flint, The Rise of Magic in Early Medieval Europe (Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1991).

Author: Albrecht Classen

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG

ISBN: 9783110776874

Category: History

Page: 642

View: 420

Die neue englischsprachige Reihe zur Mediävistik strebt eine methodisch reflektierte, anspruchsvolle Verbindung von Text- und Kulturwissenschaft an. Sie widmet sich den kulturellen Grundthemen der mittelalterlichen Welt aus der Perspektive der Literatur- und Geschichtswissenschaft. ‚Grundthemen' sind die kulturprägenden Denkbilder, Weltanschauungen, Sozialstrukturen und Alltagsbedingungen des mittelalterlichen Lebens, also z. B. Kindheit und Alter, Sexualität, Religion, Medizin, Rituale, Arbeit, Armut und Reichtum, Aberglauben, Erde und Kosmos, Stadt und Land, Krieg, Emotionen, Kommunikation, Reisen usw. Die Reihe greift wichtige aktuelle Fachdiskussionen auf und stellt ein Forum der interdisziplinären Mittelalter-Forschung dar. Fundamentals of Medieval and Early Modern Culture steht Sammelbänden ebenso offen wie Monographien. Intention ist immer, kompendienhafte Werke zu zentralen Fragen der mittelalterlichen Kulturgeschichte vorzulegen, die einen soliden Überblick über einen geschlossenen Themenkreis aus der Perspektive verschiedener Fachdisziplinen vermitteln. Im Ganzen bietet die Reihe so eine Enzyklopädie der mittelalterlichen Literatur- und Kulturgeschichte und ihrer Hauptthemen. Es werden ca. zwei Bände pro Jahr erscheinen.
Categories: History

The Long Morning of Medieval Europe

The Long Morning of Medieval Europe

Origins of Europe: Archaeology and the Pirenne Thesis (London, 1983), which should be used in the extensively revised ... 302–32; Valerie I.J. Flint, The Rise of Magic in Early Medieval Europe (Princeton, NJ, 1991); Alexander Murray, ...

Author: Jennifer R. Davis

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781351886369

Category: History

Page: 368

View: 954

Recent advances in research show that the distinctive features of high medieval civilization began developing centuries earlier than previously thought. The era once dismissed as a "Dark Age" now turns out to have been the long morning of the medieval millennium: the centuries from AD 500 to 1000 witnessed the dawn of developments that were to shape Europe for centuries to come. In 2004, historians, art historians, archaeologists, and literary specialists from Europe and North America convened at Harvard University for an interdisciplinary conference exploring new directions in the study of that long morning of medieval Europe, the early Middle Ages. Invited to think about what seemed to each the most exciting new ways of investigating the early development of western European civilization, this impressive group of international scholars produced a wide-ranging discussion of innovative types of research that define tomorrow's field today. The contributors, many of whom rarely publish in English, test approaches extending from using ancient DNA to deducing cultural patterns signified by thousands of medieval manuscripts of saints' lives. They examine the archaeology of slave labor, economic systems, disease history, transformations of piety, the experience of power and property, exquisite literary sophistication, and the construction of the meaning of palace spaces or images of the divinity. The book illustrates in an approachable style the vitality of research into the early Middle Ages, and the signal contributions of that era to the future development of western civilization. The chapters cluster around new approaches to five key themes: the early medieval economy; early medieval holiness; representation and reality in early medieval literary art; practices of power in an early medieval empire; and the intellectuality of early medieval art and architecture. Michael McCormick's brief introductions open each part of the volume; synthetic essays by accomplished specialists conclude them. The editors summarize the whole in a synoptic introduction. All Latin terms and citations and other foreign-language quotations are translated, making this work accessible even to undergraduates. The Long Morning of Medieval Europe: New Directions in Early Medieval Studies presents innovative research across the wide spectrum of study of the early Middle Ages. It exemplifies the promising questions and methodologies at play in the field today, and the directions that beckon tomorrow.
Categories: History