The Reception of Aeschylus Plays Through Shifting Models and Frontiers

The Reception of Aeschylus  Plays Through Shifting Models and Frontiers

The volume seeks to reshape current debates about the place of his tragedies in the curriculum and the repertory in a scholarly manner that is accessible and innovative.

Author: Stratos Constantinidis

Publisher: Brill

ISBN: 9004331158

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 412

View: 682

In The Reception of Aeschylus' Plays 15 scholars explore new methods and frontiers for studying and staging Aeschylus plays by showing the tensions between traditional scholarship and innovative analysis in reception studies and performance studies."
Categories: Literary Criticism

The Reception of Aeschylus Plays through Shifting Models and Frontiers

The Reception of Aeschylus    Plays through Shifting Models and Frontiers

through Shifting Models and Frontiers Edited by Stratos E. Constantinidis LEIDEN | BOSTON Cover photo: Carl Orff's Prometheus, directed by Lemi Ponifasio and. The Reception of Aeschylus' Plays The Reception of Aeschylus' Plays through ...

Author: Stratos Constantinidis

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9789004332164

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 425

View: 233

In The Reception of Aeschylus' Plays 15 scholars explore new methods and frontiers for studying and staging Aeschylus’ plays by showing the tensions between traditional scholarship and innovative analysis in reception studies and performance studies.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Fragmentation in Ancient Greek Drama

Fragmentation in Ancient Greek Drama

(2017), The Reception of Aeschylus' Plays through Shifting Models and Frontiers, Leiden/Brill. Donadi, F. (1977–1978), “Gorgia, Elena 16”, Bollottino dell'Istituto di Filologia Greca 4, 48–77. Dover, K. (1993), Aristophanes: Frogs.

Author: Anna A. Lamari

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG

ISBN: 9783110621693

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 734

View: 447

This volume examines whether dramatic fragments should be approached as parts of a greater whole or as self-contained entities. It comprises contributions by a broad spectrum of international scholars: by young researchers working on fragmentary drama as well as by well-known experts in this field. The volume explores another kind of fragmentation that seems already to have been embraced by the ancient dramatists: quotations extracted from their context and immersed in a new whole, in which they work both as cohesive unities and detachable entities. Sections of poetic works circulated in antiquity not only as parts of a whole, but also independently, i.e. as component fractions, rather like quotations on facebook today. Fragmentation can thus be seen operating on the level of dissociation, but also on the level of cohesion. The volume investigates interpretive possibilities, quotation contexts, production and reception stages of fragmentary texts, looking into the ways dramatic fragments can either increase the depth of fragmentation or strengthen the intensity of cohesion.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Brill s Companion to the Reception of Aeschylus

Brill s Companion to the Reception of Aeschylus

But, always, he has been present, even if those using his ideas or stories have not realized that they were doing it. Ideally, readers of this volume will ... The Reception of Aeschylus Plays through Shifting Models and Frontiers.

Author: Rebecca Futo Kennedy

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9789004348820

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 654

View: 761

Brill’s Companion to the Reception of Aeschylus explores the various ways Aeschylus’ tragedies have been revisioned and adapted over the last 2500 years, focusing both on his theatrical reception and his reception in other media and genres.
Categories: Literary Criticism

The Philosophical Stage

The Philosophical Stage

... “Aeschylus and His Afterlife in the Classical Period: 'My Poetry Did Not Die with Me,' ” in The Reception of Aeschylus' Plays through Shifting Models and Frontiers, ed. Stratos Constantinidis (Leiden: Brill, 2017), 51–79. 94.

Author: Joshua Billings

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9780691205182

Category: Drama

Page: 286

View: 768

"In this book, classicist Joshua Billings considers classical Greek drama as intellectual history. Developing an innovative approach to dramatic form as a mode of philosophical thought, Billings recasts early Greek intellectual history as a conversation across types of discourses and demonstrates the significance of dramatic reflections on widely-shared conceptual questions. He integrates evidence from tragedy, comedy, and satyr play into the development of early Greek philosophy in order to place poetry at the center of Greek thought. He thus offers a substantially new history and map of classical intellectual culture: drama, on his view, appears as our best source for understanding the thought of the fifth century, while at the same time revealing significant tensions and anxieties in the development of philosophy. At the heart of the book is a novel approach to the philosophical qualities of drama. Though dramatists and their works have been considered philosophical in a variety of ways going back to antiquity, scholarly approaches have consistently taken "literature" and "philosophy" as defined categories, tracing more or less direct connections between one and the other. On the contrary, Billings argues that neither "literature" nor "philosophy" were available as stable categories in the fifth century. Rather he describes the way that drama treats issues that would come to be called philosophical, without relying on assumptions concerning what constitutes philosophical method or literary form. Drama develops a kind of method that allows it to pose and pursue conceptual questions in dramatic form which Billings describes as the "philosophical poetics" of drama"--
Categories: Drama

Translating and Adapting Aeschylus Seven Against Thebes in the United States

Translating and Adapting Aeschylus  Seven Against Thebes in the United States

Poole, Adrian (1999), “Aeschylus, 1: The Oresteia by David R. Slavitt; Euripides, 1: Medea, Hecuba, Andromache, the Bacchae by David R. ... The Reception of Aeschylus' Plays Through Shifting Models and Frontiers, Leiden: Brill: 107-30.

Author: Giovanna Di Martino

Publisher: Skenè. Texts and Studies

ISBN: 9791220061896

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 188

View: 391

After centuries of neglect, Aeschylus’ Seven Against Thebes has gained increasing prominence worldwide and in the United States in particular, where a hip-hop production caught the public imagination in the new millennium. This study analyses three translations of Aeschylus’ tragedy (by Helen H. Bacon and Anthony Hecht, 1973; Stephen Sandy, 1999; and Carl R. Mueller, 2002) and two adaptations (by Will Power, 2001-2008; and Ellen Stewart, 2001-2004). Beginning in the late 1960s, the Seven Against Thebes has received multiple new readings: at stake are Eteocles’ and Polynices’ relationships with the (past and present) Labdacid dynasty; the brothers’ claims to the Theban polis and to their inheritance; and the metatheatrical implications of their relationship to Oedipus’ legacy. This previously forgotten play provides a timely response to the power dynamics at work in the contemporary US, where the fight for ethnic, cultural, economic, and linguistic recognition is a daily reality and always involves dialogue with the individual’s own past and tradition.
Categories: Language Arts & Disciplines

The Lost Plays of Greek Tragedy Volume 2

The Lost Plays of Greek Tragedy  Volume 2

The Reception of Aeschylus' Plays through Shifting Models and Frontiers (Leiden): 131–46. Reid, J. Davidson (1993) The Oxford Guide to Classical Mythology in the Arts (Oxford). Reinhardt, K. (1979) Sophocles (tr.

Author: Matthew Wright

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781474276481

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 320

View: 179

The surviving works of Aeschylus, Sophocles and Euripides have been familiar to readers and theatregoers for centuries; but these works are far outnumbered by their lost plays. Between them these authors wrote around two hundred tragedies, the fragmentary remains of which are utterly fascinating. In this, the second volume of a major new survey of the tragic genre, Matthew Wright offers an authoritative critical guide to the lost plays of the three best-known tragedians. (The other Greek tragedians and their work are discussed in Volume 1: Neglected Authors.) What can we learn about the lost plays of Aeschylus, Sophocles and Euripides from fragments and other types of evidence? How can we develop strategies or methodologies for 'reading' lost plays? Why were certain plays preserved and transmitted while others disappeared from view? Would we have a different impression of the work of these classic authors – or of Greek tragedy as a whole – if a different selection of plays had survived? This book answers such questions through a detailed study of the fragments in their historical and literary context. Making use of recent scholarly developments and new editions of the fragments, The Lost Plays of Greek Tragedy makes these works fully accessible for the first time.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Theatrical Reenactment in Pindar and Aeschylus

Theatrical Reenactment in Pindar and Aeschylus

Aeschylus and his Afterlife in the Classical Period: 'My Poetry Did Not Die with me',” in Constantinidis, S. (ed.), The Reception of Aeschylus' Plays through Shifting Models and Frontiers (Leiden), 51–79 Harris, W.V. 2009.

Author: Anna Uhlig

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781108481830

Category: Drama

Page: 319

View: 349

Argues that the songs of Pindar and Aeschylus share a "theatrical" spirit that illuminates choral performance in Classical Greece.
Categories: Drama

Looking at Persians

Looking at Persians

The Reception of Aeschylus' Plays through Shifting Models and Frontiers, 131–46, Leiden, 2016. Rich, J. and Shipley, G. (eds), War and Society in the Greek World, London and New York, 1993. Roberts, J. T., Accountability in Athenian ...

Author: David Stuttard

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781350227941

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 321

View: 693

Aeschylus' Persians is unique in being the only extant Greek tragedy on an historical subject: Greece's victory in 480 BC over the great Persian King, Xerxes, eight years before the play was written and first performed in 472 BC. Looking at Persians examines how Aeschylus responded to such a turning point in Athenian history and how his audience may have reacted to his play. As well as considering the play's relationship with earlier lost tragedies and discussing its central themes, including war, nature and the value of human life, the volume considers how Persians may have been staged in fifth-century Athens and how it has been performed today. The twelve essays presented here are written by prominent international academics and offer insightful analyses of the play from the perspectives of performance, history and society. Intended for readers ranging from school students and undergraduates to teachers and those interested in drama (including practitioners), this volume also includes an accurate, accessible and performance-friendly English translation of Persians by David Stuttard.
Categories: Literary Collections

Looking at Agamemnon

Looking at Agamemnon

The Reception of Aeschylus' Plays through Shifting Models and Frontiers, 280–303, Leiden, 2016. Harris, Z., Agamemnon's Return, in This Restless House, 15–136, London, 2016. Heaney, S., The Spirit Level, London, 1996.

Author: David Stuttard

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781350149557

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 240

View: 292

Agamemnon is the first of the three plays within the Oresteia trilogy and is considered to be one of Aeschylus' greatest works. This collection of 12 essays, written by prominent international academics, brings together a wide range of topics surrounding Agamemnon from its relationship with ancient myth and ritual to its modern reception. There is a diverse array of discussion on the salient themes of murder, choice and divine agency. Other essays also offer new approaches to understanding the notions of wealth and the natural world which imbue the play, as well as a study of the philosophical and moral questions of choice and revenge. Arguments are contextualized in terms of performance, history and society, discussing what the play meant to ancient audiences and how it is now received in the modern theatre. Intended for readers ranging from school students and undergraduates to teachers and those interested in drama (including practitioners), this volume includes a performer-friendly and accessible English translation by David Stuttard.
Categories: Literary Collections