The Rational Optimist

The Rational Optimist

In his bold and bracing exploration into how human culture evolves positively through exchange and specialization, bestselling author Matt Ridley does more than describe how things are getting better. He explains why.

Author: Matt Ridley

Publisher: Harper Collins

ISBN: 9780061452062

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 480

View: 355

For two hundred years the pessimists have dominated public discourse, insisting that things will soon be getting much worse. But in fact, life is getting better—and at an accelerating rate. Food availability, income, and life span are up; disease, child mortality, and violence are down all across the globe. Africa is following Asia out of poverty; the Internet, the mobile phone, and container shipping are enriching people's lives as never before. In his bold and bracing exploration into how human culture evolves positively through exchange and specialization, bestselling author Matt Ridley does more than describe how things are getting better. He explains why. An astute, refreshing, and revelatory work that covers the entire sweep of human history—from the Stone Age to the Internet—The Rational Optimist will change your way of thinking about the world for the better.
Categories: Business & Economics

Discourses of Globalisation Ideology and Human Rights

Discourses of Globalisation  Ideology  and Human Rights

The case for rational optimism. Edison. Radelet, S. (2015). The great surge: The ascent of the developing ... The rational optimist: How prosperity evolves (P.S.). Harper-Collins. Roberts, M. T. (2020). Globalization and neoliberalism: ...

Author: Joseph I. Zajda

Publisher: Springer Nature

ISBN: 9783030905903

Category: Education

Page: 221

View: 869

This book examines dominant discourses in human rights education globally. Using diverse paradigms, ranging from critical theory to discourse analysis, the book examines major human rights education reforms and policy issues in a global culture, with a focus on the ambivalent and problematic relationship between human rights education discourses, ideology and the state. The book discusses democracy, ideology and human rights, which are among the most critical and significant factors defining and contextualising the processes surrounding human rights education globally. The book critiques current human rights education practices and policy reforms, illustrating the shifts in the relationship between the state, ideology, and human rights education policy. Written by authors from diverse backgrounds and regions, the book examines current developments in research concerning human rights education. The book enables readers to gain a more holistic understanding of the nexus between human rights education, and dominant ideologies, both locally and globally. It also provides an easily accessible, practical yet scholarly insights into international concerns in the field of human rights education in the context of global culture.
Categories: Education

Teaching what Matters

Teaching what Matters

The Rational Optimist: How Prosperity Evolves (P.S.). Illustrated, Harper Perennial, 2011. Rifkin, Jeremy. The Empathic Civilization: The Race to Global Consciousness in a World in Crisis. 1st ed., TarcherPerigee, 2009 ...

Author: Steve A. Banno

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 9781475860917

Category: Affective education

Page: 226

View: 890

Teaching What Matters is a comprehensive guidebook distilling that course with emerging research in the science of happiness and altruism.
Categories: Affective education

Climate Catastrophe Science or Science Fiction

Climate Catastrophe  Science or Science Fiction

The Rational Optimist: How Prosperity Evolves (P.S.) (p. 35). 500 man-hours of skilled labor to make a suit! In the U.S. the labor costs alone would be over $5,000. Compare a modern woman in Paris to King Louis XIV, who had 498 servants ...

Author: Andy May

Publisher: Andy May Petrophysicist LLC

ISBN: 9781642554441

Category: Science

Page: 295

View: 388

This book is dedicated to science. Scientists are skeptical, we ask: “Is that idea correct? How can I test it?” Then we resolve to gather and analyze data until we show it isn’t or it might be. If we cannot disprove the idea, it survives. No true scientist “believes in science” because he knows science is a process, a process we use to uncover the truth. One cannot have faith in science, but one can believe in the scientific process or method.
Categories: Science

In Defense of Liberal Democracy

In Defense of Liberal Democracy

See , for example , Matt Ridley , The Rational Optimist : How Prosperity Evolves ( P.S. ) , ( New York : HarperCollins , 2010 ) ; and Peter Diamantis and Steven Kotler , Abundance : The Future Is Better than You Think ( New York : Free ...

Author: Manuel Hinds

Publisher: Charlesbridge Publishing

ISBN: 9781632892263

Category: Political Science

Page: 288

View: 967

In Defense of Liberal Democracy is a clarion call for today's divided time: a bold reaffirmation of the liberal democratic principles that have carried America through each crisis in its history--and can do so again. Merging expert historical, political, and economic analysis, In Defense of Liberal Democracy shows how our recent technological revolution--what high-profile economist Manuel Hinds calls the Connectivity Revolution--has led to a crisis of divisiveness. Assessing the angry rhetoric and polarization of current political and social discourse in the US, Hinds considers the dangers of seeking populist solutions to our current upheaval and shows how the traditions and institutions of liberal democracy restored prosperity, freedom, and social equity during the Industrial Revolution, the Great Depression, and other periods of political instability. Hinds examines our national past and present (up to and including the 2020 presidential election) to illustrate how current events can be as dramatic as any historical legacy in warning us of the danger of abandoning our democratic principles.
Categories: Political Science

10 Mindframes for Visible Learning

10 Mindframes for Visible Learning

The rational optimist: How prosperity evolves. New York: Harper Perennial. Rubie-Davies, C. (2014). ... Shayer, M., & Adey, P. S. (1981). Towards a science of science teaching . London: Heinemann Educational Books.

Author: John Hattie

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781351796866

Category: Education

Page: 180

View: 384

The original Visible Learning research concluded that one of the most important influencers of student achievement is how teachers think about learning and their own role. In Ten Mindframes for Visible Learning, John Hattie and Klaus Zierer define the ten behaviors or mindframes that teachers need to adopt in order to maximize student success. These include: thinking of and evaluating your impact on students’ learning; the importance of assessment and feedback for teachers; working collaboratively and the sense of community; the notion that learning needs to be challenging; engaging in dialogue and the correct balance between talking and listening; conveying the success criteria to learners; building positive relationships. These powerful mindframes, which should underpin every action in schools, are founded on the principle that teachers are evaluators, change agents, learning experts, and seekers of feedback who are constantly engaged with dialogue and challenge. This practical guide, which includes questionnaires, scenarios, checklists, and exercises, will show any school exactly how to implement Hattie’s mindframes to maximize success.
Categories: Education

Politics and the Life Sciences

Politics and the Life Sciences

Contrasting rational and psychological analyses of political choice. American Political Science Review, 82(3), ... The rational optimist: How prosperity evolves. New York, NY: Harper. ... Russell, P. S., & Giner-Sorolla, R. (2013).

Author: Robert H. Blank

Publisher: Emerald Group Publishing

ISBN: 9781784411077

Category: Political Science

Page: 300

View: 897

This book examines the development of biopolitics as an academic perspective within political science. It reviews the work of the leading proponents of this perspective and presents a comprehensive view of biopolitics as a framework to structure political inquiry.
Categories: Political Science

Teaching Crowds

Teaching Crowds

The rational optimist: How prosperity evolves. London, UK: HarperCollins e-books. Riedl, M. O., & Amant, R. S. (2003). ... Salganik, M.J., Dobbs, P. S., &Watts, D.J. (2006). Experimental study of inequality and unpredictability in an ...

Author: John Dron

Publisher: Athabasca University Press

ISBN: 9781927356807

Category: Education

Page: 370

View: 479

Within the rapidly expanding field of educational technology, learners and educators must confront a seemingly overwhelming selection of tools designed to deliver and facilitate both online and blended learning. Many of these tools assume that learning is configured and delivered in closed contexts, through learning management systems (LMS). However, while traditional "classroom" learning is by no means obsolete, networked learning is in the ascendant. A foundational method in online and blended education, as well as the most common means of informal and self-directed learning, networked learning is rapidly becoming the dominant mode of teaching as well as learning. In Teaching Crowds, Dron and Anderson introduce a new model for understanding and exploiting the pedagogical potential of Web-based technologies, one that rests on connections — on networks and collectives — rather than on separations. Recognizing that online learning both demands and affords new models of teaching and learning, the authors show how learners can engage with social media platforms to create an unbounded field of emergent connections. These connections empower learners, allowing them to draw from one another’s expertise to formulate and fulfill their own educational goals. In an increasingly networked world, developing such skills will, they argue, better prepare students to become self-directed, lifelong learners.
Categories: Education

Denial

Denial

2 (2010): 8977–84; PS Kim, JE Coxworth, and K Hawkes, “Increased Longevity Evolves from Grandmothering,” Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological ... 34 Matt Ridley, The Rational Optimist: How Prosperity Evolves (Harper, 2010).

Author: Ajit Varki

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN: 9781455511921

Category: Science

Page: 384

View: 637

The history of science abounds with momentous theories that disrupted conventional wisdom and yet were eventually proven true. Ajit Varki and Danny Brower's "Mind over Reality" theory is poised to be one such idea-a concept that runs counter to commonly-held notions about human evolution but that may hold the key to understanding why humans evolved as we did, leaving all other related species far behind. At a chance meeting in 2005, Brower, a geneticist, posed an unusual idea to Varki that he believed could explain the origins of human uniqueness among the world's species: Why is there no humanlike elephant or humanlike dolphin, despite millions of years of evolutionary opportunity? Why is it that humans alone can understand the minds of others? Haunted by their encounter, Varki tried years later to contact Brower only to discover that he had died unexpectedly. Inspired by an incomplete manuscript Brower left behind, Denial presents a radical new theory on the origins of our species. It was not, the authors argue, a biological leap that set humanity apart from other species, but a psychological one: namely, the uniquely human ability to deny reality in the face of inarguable evidence-including the willful ignorance of our own inevitable deaths. The awareness of our own mortality could have caused anxieties that resulted in our avoiding the risks of competing to procreate-an evolutionary dead-end. Humans therefore needed to evolve a mechanism for overcoming this hurdle: the denial of reality. As a consequence of this evolutionary quirk we now deny any aspects of reality that are not to our liking-we smoke cigarettes, eat unhealthy foods, and avoid exercise, knowing these habits are a prescription for an early death. And so what has worked to establish our species could be our undoing if we continue to deny the consequences of unrealistic approaches to everything from personal health to financial risk-taking to climate change. On the other hand reality-denial affords us many valuable attributes, such as optimism, confidence, and courage in the face of long odds. Presented in homage to Brower's original thinking, Denial offers a powerful warning about the dangers inherent in our remarkable ability to ignore reality-a gift that will either lead to our downfall, or continue to be our greatest asset.
Categories: Science

Genome

Genome

The genome's been mapped.

Author: Matt Ridley

Publisher: Harper Collins

ISBN: 9780060894085

Category: Science

Page: 370

View: 799

The genome's been mapped. But what does it mean? Arguably the most significant scientific discovery of the new century, the mapping of the twenty-three pairs of chromosomes that make up the human genome raises almost as many questions as it answers. Questions that will profoundly impact the way we think about disease, about longevity, and about free will. Questions that will affect the rest of your life. Genome offers extraordinary insight into the ramifications of this incredible breakthrough. By picking one newly discovered gene from each pair of chromosomes and telling its story, Matt Ridley recounts the history of our species and its ancestors from the dawn of life to the brink of future medicine. From Huntington's disease to cancer, from the applications of gene therapy to the horrors of eugenics, Matt Ridley probes the scientific, philosophical, and moral issues arising as a result of the mapping of the genome. It will help you understand what this scientific milestone means for you, for your children, and for humankind.
Categories: Science