The Press We Deserve

Author: Richard Boston

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317403452

Category: Social Science

Page: 164

View: 4550

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Originally published in 1970. This book takes an extremely critical look at the British Press and explodes complacently held views of the time about the merits and virtues of British newspapers. From its polemical introduction by the editor it continues with chapters by a strong host of contributors to set the press in historical context, consider Fleet Street’s methods, and look at the effect of advertising. Particular aspects investigated are that of women’s journalism, sport, financial journalism and reviewing. Final chapters look at the underground, fringe press, provincial papers, and a comparison with other countries’ press.
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After The Open Society

Selected Social and Political Writings

Author: Karl Popper

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1135627118

Category: Philosophy

Page: 494

View: 1260

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In this long-awaited volume, Jeremy Shearmur and Piers Norris Turner bring to light Popper's most important unpublished and uncollected writings from the time of The Open Society until his death in 1994. After The Open Society: Selected Social and Political Writings reveals the development of Popper's political and philosophical thought during and after the Second World War, from his early socialism through to the radical humanitarianism of The Open Society. The papers in this collection, many of which are available here for the first time, demonstrate the clarity and pertinence of Popper's thinking on such topics as religion, history, Plato and Aristotle, while revealing a lifetime of unwavering political commitment. After The Open Society illuminates the thought of one of the twentieth century's greatest philosophers and is essential reading for anyone interested in the recent course of philosophy, politics, history and society.
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G.W.M. Reynolds

Nineteenth-Century Fiction, Politics, and the Press

Author: Anne Humpherys

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1351935089

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 314

View: 5678

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G.W.M. Reynolds (1814-1879) had a major impact on the mid-Victorian era that until now has been largely unacknowledged. A prolific novelist whose work had a massive circulation, and an influential journalist and editor, he was a man of contradictions in both his life and writing: a middle-class figure who devoted his life to working class issues but seldom missed a chance to profit from the exploitation of current issues; the founder of the radical newspaper Reynolds Weekly, as well as a bestselling author of historical romances, gothic and sensation novels, oriental tales, and domestic fiction; a perennial bankrupt who nevertheless ended his life prosperously. A figure of such diversity requires a collaborative study. Bringing together a distinguished group of scholars, this volume does justice to the full range of Reynolds's achievement and influence. With proper emphasis on new work in the field, the contributors take on Reynolds's involvement with Chartism, serial publication, the mass market periodical, commodity culture, and the introduction of French literature into British consciousness, to name just a few of the topics covered. The Mysteries of London, the century's most widely read serial, receives the extensive treatment this long-running urban gothic work deserves. Adding to the volume's usefulness are comprehensive bibliographies of Reynolds's own writings and secondary criticism relevant to the study of this central figure in mid-nineteenth-century Britain.
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Modernism on Fleet Street

Author: Patrick Collier

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1351916939

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 265

View: 4982

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British modernism came of age at a time of great cultural anxiety about the state of journalism. The new newspapers, with their brief, flashy articles, striking visuals, hyperbolic headlines, and sensational news, stood at the center of debates about reading in the period, seeming to threaten the viability of representative democracy, the health and vitality of the language, and the very future of literature itself. Patrick Collier's study brings an impressive array of archival research to his exploration of modernism's relationship to the newspaper press. People who sought to make their way as writers could neither remain neutral on this issue nor abandon journalism, which offered an irreplaceable source of income and self-advertisement. Collier discusses five modern writers-T. S. Eliot, James Joyce, Virginia Woolf, Rebecca West, and Rose Macaulay-showing how their work takes part in contemporary debates about journalism and examining the role journalism played in establishing their careers. In doing so, he uncovers tensions and contradictions inherent in the identity of the 'serious artist' who relied on the ephemeral forms of journalism for money and reputation.
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