The Politics of Indigeneity

The Politics of Indigeneity

This book casts light on the constitutional politics in both countries that are redefining the relationship of indigenous peoples to the state. A unique and timely discussion.

Author: Roger Maaka

Publisher: Otago University Press

ISBN: UOM:39015062835841

Category: Political Science

Page: 350

View: 383

Indigenous peoples are increasingly uniting around a commonality of concerns, needs and ambitions. In both New Zealand and Canada, these politics challenge the colonial structures that social and political systems are built upon. Both countries have accomplished much in their management of indigenous issues. New Zealand has begun to right historical wrongs through treaty settlements and to implement bicultural strategies. Canada is experimenting with self-government for aboriginal peoples. Yet there are still many issues to be addresses, with recent statistics showing indigenous peoples in bother these countries struggling to balance functioning in everyday life with preserving their cultures. This book casts light on the constitutional politics in both countries that are redefining the relationship of indigenous peoples to the state. A unique and timely discussion.
Categories: Political Science

The Politics of Indigeneity

The Politics of Indigeneity

Timely and topical in its focus on global indigenous politics, and featuring a variety of first-hand indigenous voices - including those of indigenous activists, scholars, leaders and interviewees - this is a vital contribution to an often ...

Author: Sita Venkateswar

Publisher: Zed Books Ltd.

ISBN: 9781780322551

Category: Political Science

Page: 296

View: 738

Provocative and original, The Politics of Indigeneity explores the concept of indigeneity across the world - from the Americas to New Zealand, Africa to Asia - and the ways in which it intersects with local, national and international social and political realities. Taking on the role of critical interlocutors, the authors engage in extended dialogue with indigenous spokespersons and activists, as well as between each other. In doing so, they explore the possibilities of a 'second-wave indigeneity' - one that is alert to the challenges posed to indigenous aspirations by the neo-liberal agenda of nation-states and their concerns with sovereignty. Timely and topical in its focus on global indigenous politics, and featuring a variety of first-hand indigenous voices - including those of indigenous activists, scholars, leaders and interviewees - this is a vital contribution to an often contentious topic.
Categories: Political Science

Arab Minority Nationalism in Israel

Arab Minority Nationalism in Israel

Using the relationship between the state of Israel and the Arab national minority as a case study, this book provides a thorough examination of minority nationalism and state-minority relations in Israel.

Author: Amal Jamal

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781136824111

Category: History

Page: 336

View: 440

National minorities and their behaviour have become a central topic in comparative politics in the last few decades. Using the relationship between the state of Israel and the Arab national minority as a case study, this book provides a thorough examination of minority nationalism and state-minority relations in Israel. Placing the case of the Arab national minority in Israel within a comparative framework, the author analyses major debates taking place in the field of collective action, social movements, civil society and indigenous rights. He demonstrates the impact of the state regime on the political behaviours of the minorities, and sheds light on the similarities and differences between various types of minority nationalisms and the nature of the relationship such minorities could have with their states. Drawing empirical and theoretical conclusions that contribute to studies of Israeli politics, political minorities, indigenous populations and conflict issues, this book will be a valuable reference for students and those in policy working on issues around Israeli politics, Palestinian politics and the broader Palestinian-Israeli conflict.
Categories: History

The Politics of Indigeneity

The Politics of Indigeneity

Timely and topical in its focus on global indigenous politics, and featuring a variety of first-hand indigenous voices - including those of indigenous activists, scholars, leaders, and interviewees - this is a vital contribution to an often ...

Author: Sita Venkateswar

Publisher: Zed Books

ISBN: 1780321201

Category: Political Science

Page: 288

View: 686

Provocative and original, The Politics of Indigeneity explores the concept of indigeneity across the world- from the Americas to New Zealand, Africa to Asia - and the ways in which it intersects with local, national, and international social and political realities. Taking on the role of critical interlocutors, the authors engage in extended dialogue with indigenous spokespersons and activists, as well as between each other. In doing so, they explore the possibilities of a "second-wave indigeneity" - one that is alert to the challenges posed to indigenous aspirations by the neo-liberal agenda of nation-states and their concerns with sovereignty. Timely and topical in its focus on global indigenous politics, and featuring a variety of first-hand indigenous voices - including those of indigenous activists, scholars, leaders, and interviewees - this is a vital contribution to an often contentious topic.
Categories: Political Science

S mi Musical Performance and the Politics of Indigeneity in Northern Europe

S  mi Musical Performance and the Politics of Indigeneity in Northern Europe

In Sámi Musical Performance and the Politics of Indigeneity in Northern Europe, ethnomusicologist Thomas Hilder offers the first book-length study of this diverse and dynamic music scene and its intersection with the politics of ...

Author: Thomas Hilder

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 9780810888968

Category: Music

Page: 262

View: 848

In Sámi Musical Performance and the Politics of Indigeneity in Northern Europe, ethnomusicologist Thomas Hilder offers the first book-length study of this diverse and dynamic music scene and its intersection with the politics of indigeneity.
Categories: Music

Faith Politics and Reconciliation

Faith  Politics and Reconciliation

The story of a relationship between religious ideas and political decisions

Author: Dominic O'Sullivan

Publisher: ATF Press

ISBN: 192069143X

Category: Philosophy

Page: 296

View: 141

Dominic OSullivan takes us on a theological, philosophical and political journey from the countries of Europe to the colonies of Australia and New Zealand.
Categories: Philosophy

Who is an Indian

Who is an Indian

But just as important, who is permitted to ask, and answer this question? This collection examines the changing roles of race and place in the politics of defining Indigenous identities in the Americas.

Author: Maximilian C. Forte

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN: 9780802095527

Category: Social Science

Page: 254

View: 841

Who is an Indian? This is possibly the oldest question facing Indigenous peoples across the Americas, and one with significant implications for decisions relating to resource distribution, conflicts over who gets to live where and for how long, and clashing principles of governance and law. For centuries, the dominant views on this issue have been strongly shaped by ideas of both race and place. But just as important, who is permitted to ask, and answer this question? This collection examines the changing roles of race and place in the politics of defining Indigenous identities in the Americas. Drawing on case studies of Indigenous communities across North America, the Caribbean, Central America, and South America, it is a rare volume to compare Indigenous experience throughout the western hemisphere. The contributors question the vocabulary, legal mechanisms, and applications of science in constructing the identities of Indigenous populations, and consider ideas of nation, land, and tradition in moving indigeneity beyond race.
Categories: Social Science

Indigeneity and Political Theory

Indigeneity and Political Theory

An engaging and highly original analysis of Indigenenity and sovereignty, this book enables the reader to develop a more robust consideration of relationships between theory and practice, and thus the politics of theorizing.

Author: Karena Shaw

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781135970369

Category: Philosophy

Page: 256

View: 853

Indigeneity and Political Theory engages some of the profound challenges to traditions of modern political theory that have been posed over the past two decades. Karena Shaw is especially concerned with practices of sovereignty as they are embedded in and shape Indigenous politics, and responses to Indigenous politics. Drawing on theories of post-coloniality, feminism, globalization, and international politics, and using examples of contemporary political practice including court cases and specific controversies, Shaw seeks to illustrate and argue for a way of doing political theory that is more responsive to the challenges posed by a range of contemporary issues. An engaging and highly original analysis of Indigenenity and sovereignty, this book enables the reader to develop a more robust consideration of relationships between theory and practice, and thus the politics of theorizing.
Categories: Philosophy

Indigeneity A Politics of Potential

Indigeneity  A Politics of Potential

This original book is the first comprehensive integration of political theory to explain indigenous politics.

Author: O'Sullivan, Dominic

Publisher: Policy Press

ISBN: 9781447339441

Category: Political Science

Page: 216

View: 780

This original book is the first comprehensive integration of political theory to explain indigenous politics. It assesses the ways in which indigenous and liberal political theories interact to consider the practical policy implications of the indigenous right to self-determination. Providing opportunities for indigenous peoples to pursue culturally framed understandings of liberal democratic citizenship, the author reveals indigeneity’s concern for political relationships, agendas and ideas beyond the ethnic minority claim to liberal recognition. The implications for national reconciliation, liberal democracy, citizenship and historical constraints on political authority are explored. He also shows that indigeneity’s local geo-political focus, underpinned by global theoretical developments in law and politics, makes indigeneity a movement of forward looking transformational politics. This innovative, theoretically sophisticated and vibrant work will influence policy and scholarly debates on the politics of indigeneity and indigenous rights and will be of broad international interest to a transcultural, transnational and global phenomenon.
Categories: Political Science

Who is an Indian

Who is an Indian

This collection examines the changing roles of race and place in the politics of defining Indigenous identities in the Americas.

Author: Maximilian C. Forte

Publisher:

ISBN: OCLC:863053941

Category: America

Page: 254

View: 944

This collection examines the changing roles of race and place in the politics of defining Indigenous identities in the Americas.
Categories: America

The Politics of Identity

The Politics of Identity

The range of international scholars in this volume have begun an approach to the contemporary identity issues from very different perspectives, although collectively they all push the boundaries of the scholarship that relate to identities ...

Author: Michelle Harris

Publisher: UTS ePRESS

ISBN: 9780987236920

Category: Social Science

Page: 288

View: 859

The issue of Indigenous identity has gained more attention in recent years from social science scholars, yet much of the discussions still centre on the politics of belonging or not belonging. While these recent discussions in part speak to the complicated and contested nature of Indigeneity, both those who claim Indigenous identity and those who write about it seem to fall into a paradox of acknowledging its complexity on the one hand, while on the other hand reifying notions of ‘tradition’ and ‘authentic cultural expression’ as core features of an Indigenous identity. Since identity theorists generally agree that who we understand ourselves to be is as much a function of the time and place in which we live as it is about who we and others say we are, this scholarship does not progress our knowledge on the contemporary characteristics of Indigenous identity formations. The range of international scholars in this volume have begun an approach to the contemporary identity issues from very different perspectives, although collectively they all push the boundaries of the scholarship that relate to identities of Indigenous people in various contexts from around the world. Their essays provide at times provocative insights as the authors write about their own experiences and as they seek to answer the hard questions: Are emergent identities newly constructed identities that emerge as a function of historical moments, places, and social forces? If so, what is it that helps to forge these identities and what helps them to retain markers of Indigeneity? And what are some of the challenges (both from outside and within groups) that Indigenous individuals face as they negotiate the line between ‘authentic’ cultural expression and emergent identities? Is there anything to be learned from the ways in which these identities are performed throughout the world among Indigenous groups? Indeed why do we assume claims to multiple racial or ethnic identities limits one’s Indigenous identity? The question at the heart of our enquiry about the emerging Indigenous identities is when is it the right time to say me, us, we… them?
Categories: Social Science

Becoming Indigenous

Becoming Indigenous

This study explores the construction of indigeneity in two indigenous villages of Taiwan and how it has been intertwined with environmental politics since the end of the Second World War.

Author: Huei-Chung Hsiao

Publisher:

ISBN: OCLC:862753602

Category:

Page:

View: 779

This study explores the construction of indigeneity in two indigenous villages of Taiwan and how it has been intertwined with environmental politics since the end of the Second World War. Drawing on Stuart Hall's idea of articulation (1996) and Michel Foucault's concept of governmentality (1991), I develop a theoretical framework that regards the construction of indigeneity as a continuous and historically inflected process, and treats environmental politics as a complex dynamics among various 'regimes of ecology', i.e. regimes of government that aim to govern the relations between humans and the environment. The data analysed include government documents, interviews with scholars and governmental officials, and ethnographic data from and archive materials about two indigenous villages, Cinsbu and Hsinkuang. Starting with the Japanese occupation of 1895-1945 and continuing until the early 1990s when the process of political democratisation officially began, the dominant regimes of ecology in Taiwan were exploitative and coercive in nature. One crucial effect of this in Cinsbu and Hsinkuang was the articulation of resistant indigeneity, a product of the villagers' active engagement with these colonial regimes of ecology and the critical ideas and actions that were developed to challenge them. Since the early 1990s, 'neoliberal ecology', a set of regimes of ecology that is more liberating and characterised by more commercialised human-nature relationships, has prevailed. In Cinsbu and Hsinkuang, such a shift from colonial to neoliberal ecology has been manifested mainly through the promotion of tourism and community-based natural resources management by the state, tourism industry, professionals, local indigenous villagers and environmentalists. As a result, a more complex politics of indigeneity and nature, rather than one simply of domination and resistance, has developed, both between the villagers and the state and within the indigenous communities.
Categories:

Customizing Indigeneity

Customizing Indigeneity

Documenting the dynamic between historical constraints and cultural creativity, this work provides a fresh perspective on indigenous people's agency within evolving structures of inequality, while simultaneously challenging common ...

Author: Shane Greene

Publisher: Stanford University Press

ISBN: 0804761191

Category: Social Science

Page: 269

View: 330

How do vision quests, river locations, and warriors relate to indigenous activism? For the Aguaruna, an ethnic group at the forefront of Peru's Amazonian Movement, incorporating practices and values they define as customary allows them to shape their own experience as modern indigenous subjects. As Shane Greene reveals, this customization centers on the complex articulation of meaningful social practices, cultural logics, and the political economy of specialized production and consumption. Following decades of engagement with and resistance to state-mandated missionary education, land-titling, and international advocacy networks, the Aguaruna have faced numerous constraints in pursuit of their own political projects. Based on first-hand fieldwork, Customizing Indigeneity provides a new theoretical language for the politics of indigeneity. Documenting the dynamic between historical constraints and cultural creativity, this work provides a fresh perspective on indigenous people's agency within evolving structures of inequality, while simultaneously challenging common assumptions about scholarly engagement with marginalized populations.
Categories: Social Science

Indigeneity In India

Indigeneity In India

First published in 2006. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Author: Bengt T. Karlsson

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781136219221

Category: Social Science

Page: 264

View: 454

First published in 2006. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
Categories: Social Science

Beyond Biculturalism

Beyond Biculturalism

This book is a critical analysis of New Zealand's indigenous Maori public policy. O'Sullivan argues that biculturalism inevitably makes Maori the junior partner in a colonial relationship that obstructs aspirations to self-determination.

Author: Dominic O'Sullivan

Publisher: Huia Publishers

ISBN: 1869692853

Category: History

Page: 239

View: 861

This book is a critical analysis of New Zealand's indigenous Maori public policy. O'Sullivan argues that biculturalism inevitably makes Maori the junior partner in a colonial relationship that obstructs aspirations to self-determination. The political situation of Maori is compared to that of Native Americans and Aboriginal Australians.
Categories: History

Hawaiian Blood

Hawaiian Blood

Hawaiian Blood is the first comprehensive history and analysis of this federal law that equates Hawaiian cultural identity with a quantifiable amount of blood.

Author: J. Kēhaulani Kauanui

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 9780822391494

Category: History

Page: 258

View: 339

In the Hawaiian Homes Commission Act (HHCA) of 1921, the U.S. Congress defined “native Hawaiians” as those people “with at least one-half blood quantum of individuals inhabiting the Hawaiian Islands prior to 1778.” This “blood logic” has since become an entrenched part of the legal system in Hawai‘i. Hawaiian Blood is the first comprehensive history and analysis of this federal law that equates Hawaiian cultural identity with a quantifiable amount of blood. J. Kēhaulani Kauanui explains how blood quantum classification emerged as a way to undermine Native Hawaiian (Kanaka Maoli) sovereignty. Within the framework of the 50-percent rule, intermarriage “dilutes” the number of state-recognized Native Hawaiians. Thus, rather than support Native claims to the Hawaiian islands, blood quantum reduces Hawaiians to a racial minority, reinforcing a system of white racial privilege bound to property ownership. Kauanui provides an impassioned assessment of how the arbitrary correlation of ancestry and race imposed by the U.S. government on the indigenous people of Hawai‘i has had far-reaching legal and cultural effects. With the HHCA, the federal government explicitly limited the number of Hawaiians included in land provisions, and it recast Hawaiians’ land claims in terms of colonial welfare rather than collective entitlement. Moreover, the exclusionary logic of blood quantum has profoundly affected cultural definitions of indigeneity by undermining more inclusive Kanaka Maoli notions of kinship and belonging. Kauanui also addresses the ongoing significance of the 50-percent rule: Its criteria underlie recent court decisions that have subverted the Hawaiian sovereignty movement and brought to the fore charged questions about who counts as Hawaiian.
Categories: History

Global Politics and Its Violent Care for Indigeneity

Global Politics and Its Violent Care for Indigeneity

This book challenges the common perception that global politics is making progress on indigenous issues and argues that the current global care for indigeneity is, in effect, violent in nature.

Author: Marjo Lindroth

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9783319609829

Category: Political Science

Page: 152

View: 667

This book challenges the common perception that global politics is making progress on indigenous issues and argues that the current global care for indigeneity is, in effect, violent in nature. Examining the inclusion of indigenous peoples in the United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues and the Arctic Council, the authors demonstrate how seemingly benevolent practices of international political and legal recognition are tantamount to colonialism, the historical wrong they purport to redress. By unveiling the ways in which contemporary neoliberal politics commissions a certain type of indigenous subject—one distinguished by resilience in particular—the book offers a pioneering account of how international politics has tightened its grip on indigeneity.
Categories: Political Science

After Servitude

After Servitude

At stake in this work, then, is an effort to bracket the often-uncritical adoption of rights-based logics as heuristics for understanding political or reconciliatory practices, ones that tend to align justice with the fraught yet necessary ...

Author: Mareike Winchell

Publisher:

ISBN: OCLC:1031367580

Category:

Page: 285

View: 250

This dissertation examines the ways that histories of agrarian servitude in Bolivia condition the terms and experiences of state reform and political collectivity today. Building from 20 months of fieldwork in Bolivia, the research aims to critically intervene in contemporary debates concerning indigeneity, political subjectivity, and justice. Bracketing the assumption that histories of servitude operate primarily as corrosive or destructive forces, I explore what it means to live in a place perceived as still in the grips of the hacienda past and examine how inherited patterns of exchange and aid condition and are in turn transformed by current indigenous reform initiatives. Indeed, while Movement Toward Socialism (MAS) party officials see rural practices of god-parenting, informal adoption, and land gifting as colonial survivals that fuel indigenous dependency and exploitation, many rural families understand these same practices as expressions of former landlords’ obligations to former servants, including to children fathered through rape. Despite aggressive MAS reform initiatives aimed at uprooting rural relations that have grown out of the hacienda system, Quechua-speaking villagers continue to invoke patronage ideals in order to demand resources and aid not only from former landowning families but also from a new gold mining elite. Thus, while bonded histories condition and complicate state reform projects, they also give way to specific rural approaches to indigenous injury and historical reconciliation. By tracing competing approaches to past servitude, my research foregrounds the creative ways that inherited forms are inhabited and imbued with new reconciliatory possibilities, possibilities that challenge normative political analytics that locate justice in the inevitable and necessary superseding of past in present. More broadly, the work sheds light on the long-run process by which governmental concerns with bonded labor and agrarian servitude gave way to a particular form of indigenous claim-making, one that shared or at the least echoed reformers’ faith in property as a stepping-stone to modern citizenship. In particular, I show how the reformist and popular focus on land rights as an antidote to servitude and as a means to political inclusion drew from and consolidated a particular political typology, the propertied subject contrasted with and at the same time partially-productive of an appositional figure of the landless, indentured servant. However, building from ethnographic research in former hacienda villages, I show that alongside this focus on property another political tradition has persisted, one concerned not only with land or rights but also with the problem of landlords’ obligations to hacienda servants. Examining servitude both as an object of agrarian reform and as a focus of reconciliatory action today, my research sheds new light on the limits to institutional approaches to justice while at the same time showing how those limits are inhabited by other traditions of moral and reconciliatory practice. Here, rural opposition to MAS reforms stems from the existence of a distinctly post-hacienda mode of collectivity, one whose practices of labor, land use, and exchange do not map onto statist projects of propertied citizenship as well as more recent community land schemes. By tracking the complexities of Bolivian agrarian reform, the work offers a critical reframing not only of bonded histories in Latin America but, more broadly, of the centrality of servitude and possession to modern categories and juridical projects of rights-based justice. Attention to the ways that Bolivia’s history of indentured servitude shapes current agrarian reform efforts and rural modes of post-hacienda collectivity brings to light a range of questions that are obscured when servitude is examined primarily as an economic system or when political practices are fixed simply to oppositional acts of hacienda resistance or rebellion. Instead, I underline the generative workings of labor histories and consider how various forms of agrarian-based belonging and exchange resurface within or get destabilized by contemporary indigenous reform projects. At its heart, then, the dissertation aims to contribute to the task of critically re-evaluating and potentially expanding the contours of the legibly political. What modes of fulfillment or desire, morality or belonging, can be accounted for within reformist approaches to slave abolition and indigenous justice? While scholars have suggested the limits to reified categories of indigeneity, can we think through these limits without falling back upon an oppositional narrative of resistance, absorption, or inevitable displacement? At stake in this work, then, is an effort to bracket the often-uncritical adoption of rights-based logics as heuristics for understanding political or reconciliatory practices, ones that tend to align justice with the fraught yet necessary disentangling of a subject from an earlier order.
Categories: