The Pearl that Broke Its Shell

The Pearl that Broke Its Shell

Afghan-American Nadia Hashimi's literary debut novel is a searing tale of powerlessness, fate, and the freedom to control one's own fate that combines the cultural flavor and emotional resonance of the works of Khaled Hosseini, Jhumpa ...

Author: Nadia Hashimi

Publisher: William Morrow

ISBN: 0062244752

Category: Fiction

Page: 464

View: 677

Afghan-American Nadia Hashimi's literary debut novel is a searing tale of powerlessness, fate, and the freedom to control one's own fate that combines the cultural flavor and emotional resonance of the works of Khaled Hosseini, Jhumpa Lahiri, and Lisa See. In Kabul, 2007, with a drug-addicted father and no brothers, Rahima and her sisters can only sporadically attend school, and can rarely leave the house. Their only hope lies in the ancient custom of bacha posh, which allows young Rahima to dress and be treated as a boy until she is of marriageable age. As a son, she can attend school, go to the market, and chaperone her older sisters. But Rahima is not the first in her family to adopt this unusual custom. A century earlier, her great-great grandmother, Shekiba, left orphaned by an epidemic, saved herself and built a new life the same way. Crisscrossing in time, The Pearl the Broke Its Shell interweaves the tales of these two women separated by a century who share similar destinies. But what will happen once Rahima is of marriageable age? Will Shekiba always live as a man? And if Rahima cannot adapt to life as a bride, how will she survive?
Categories: Fiction

The Pearl That Broke Its Shell

The Pearl That Broke Its Shell

Her aunt, Khala Shaima, visits often, helps take care of the family, and tells the girls stories about their great-great-grandmother Shekiba. Rahima’s… PLEASE NOTE: This is summary and analysis of the book and NOT the original book.

Author: Instaread

Publisher: Instaread Summaries

ISBN: 9781945251009

Category: Fiction

Page: 34

View: 563

The Pearl That Broke Its Shell by Nadia Hashimi | Summary & Analysis Preview: The Pearl That Broke Its Shell by Afghan American novelist Nadia Hashimi tells an intergenerational story of two Afghan women whose lives are different but connected. Rahima, a teenage girl, lives in twenty-first-century Afghanistan. In the wake of Taliban rule, Afghanistan’s government is divided and the culture is fractured. Shekiba, Rahima’s great-great-grandmother, lives in early twentieth-century Afghanistan, under a monarchy. The plot moves back and forth between the two characters, chronicling their lives and the obstacles they face under oppressive patriarchal regimes. Rahima lives in a small village with her parents, her older sisters Shahla and Parwin, the latter born with a bad hip and a limp, and her younger sisters Rohila and Sitara. Her aunt, Khala Shaima, visits often, helps take care of the family, and tells the girls stories about their great-great-grandmother Shekiba. Rahima’s… PLEASE NOTE: This is summary and analysis of the book and NOT the original book. Inside this Instaread Summary of The Pearl That Broke Its Shell: Summary of the Book Important People Character Analysis Analysis of the Themes and Author’s Style About the Author With Instaread, you can get the key takeaways, summary and analysis of a book in 15 minutes. We read every chapter, identify the key takeaways and analyze them for your convenience.
Categories: Fiction

Summary of The Pearl That Broke Its Shell

Summary of The Pearl That Broke Its Shell

PLEASE NOTE: This is summary and analysis of the book and NOT the original book.Inside this Instaread Summary of The Pearl That Broke Its Shell:Summary of the BookImportant PeopleCharacter AnalysisAnalysis of the Themes and Author's ...

Author: Instaread Summaries

Publisher: Idreambooks

ISBN: 1683780264

Category: Young Adult Fiction

Page: 28

View: 115

The Pearl That Broke Its Shell by Nadia Hashimi | Summary & AnalysisPreview:The Pearl That Broke Its Shell by Afghan American novelist Nadia Hashimi tells an intergenerational story of two Afghan women whose lives are different but connected. Rahima, a teenage girl, lives in twenty-first-century Afghanistan. In the wake of Taliban rule, Afghanistan's government is divided and the culture is fractured. Shekiba, Rahima's great-great-grandmother, lives in early twentieth-century Afghanistan, under a monarchy. The plot moves back and forth between the two characters, chronicling their lives and the obstacles they face under oppressive patriarchal regimes. Rahima lives in a small village with her parents, her older sisters Shahla and Parwin, the latter born with a bad hip and a limp, and her younger sisters Rohila and Sitara. Her aunt, Khala Shaima, visits often, helps take care of the family, and tells the girls stories about their great-great-grandmother Shekiba. Rahima's...PLEASE NOTE: This is summary and analysis of the book and NOT the original book.Inside this Instaread Summary of The Pearl That Broke Its Shell:Summary of the BookImportant PeopleCharacter AnalysisAnalysis of the Themes and Author's StyleAbout the AuthorWith Instaread, you can get the key takeaways, summary and analysis of a book in 15 minutes. We read every chapter, identify the key takeaways and analyze them for your convenience.
Categories: Young Adult Fiction

Summary of the Pearl That Broke Its Shell

Summary of the Pearl That Broke Its Shell

Her aunt, Khala Shaima, visits often, helps take care of the family, and tells the girls stories about their great-great-grandmother Shekiba. Rahima's... PLEASE NOTE: This is summary and analysis of the book and NOT the original book.

Author: Instaread

Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform

ISBN: 1530841208

Category:

Page: 34

View: 367

Summary of The Pearl That Broke Its Shell by Nadia Hashimi | Includes Analysis Preview: The Pearl That Broke Its Shell by Afghan American novelist Nadia Hashimi tells an intergenerational story of two Afghan women whose lives are different but connected. Rahima, a teenage girl, lives in twenty-first-century Afghanistan. In the wake of Taliban rule, Afghanistan's government is divided and the culture is fractured. Shekiba, Rahima's great-great-grandmother, lives in early twentieth-century Afghanistan, under a monarchy. The plot moves back and forth between the two characters, chronicling their lives and the obstacles they face under oppressive patriarchal regimes. Rahima lives in a small village with her parents, her older sisters Shahla and Parwin, the latter born with a bad hip and a limp, and her younger sisters Rohila and Sitara. Her aunt, Khala Shaima, visits often, helps take care of the family, and tells the girls stories about their great-great-grandmother Shekiba. Rahima's... PLEASE NOTE: This is summary and analysis of the book and NOT the original book. Inside this Instaread Summary of The Pearl That Broke Its Shell: Summary of the Book Important People Character Analysis Analysis of the Themes and Author's Style About the Author With Instaread, you can get the key takeaways, summary and analysis of a book in 15 minutes. We read every chapter, identify the key takeaways and analyze them for your convenience.
Categories:

The Pearl That Broke Its Shell

The Pearl That Broke Its Shell

A USA Today BestsellerAfghan-American Nadia Hashimi's literary debut novel is a searing tale of powerlessness and fate that crisscrosses in time, interweaving the tales of two women separated by a century who share similar destinies.

Author: Nadia Hashimi

Publisher: Thorndike Press Large Print

ISBN: 1410493938

Category: Fiction

Page: 702

View: 575

Afghan-American Nadia Hashimi's literary debut novel is a searing tale of powerlessness, fate, and the freedom to control one's own fate that combines the cultural flavor and emotional resonance of the works of Khaled Hosseini, Jhumpa Lahiri, and Lisa See. In Kabul, 2007, with a drug-addicted father and no brothers, Rahima and her sisters can only sporadically attend school, and can rarely leave the house. Their only hope lies in the ancient custom of bacha posh, which allows young Rahima to dress and be treated as a boy until she is of marriageable age. As a son, she can attend school, go to the market, and chaperone her older sisters. But Rahima is not the first in her family to adopt this unusual custom. A century earlier, her great-great grandmother, Shekiba, left orphaned by an epidemic, saved herself and built a new life the same way. Crisscrossing in time, The Pearl the Broke Its Shell interweaves the tales of these two women separated by a century who share similar destinies. But what will happen once Rahima is of marriageable age? Will Shekiba always live as a man? And if Rahima cannot adapt to life as a bride, how will she survive?
Categories: Fiction

Study Guide

Study Guide

This 112-page guide for "The Pearl That Broke Its Shell" by Nadia Hashimi includes detailed chapter summaries and analysis covering 69 chapters, as well as several more in-depth sections of expert-written literary analysis.

Author: Supersummary

Publisher:

ISBN: 1698376715

Category:

Page: 114

View: 219

SuperSummary, a modern alternative to SparkNotes and CliffsNotes, offers high-quality study guides for challenging works of literature. This 112-page guide for "The Pearl That Broke Its Shell" by Nadia Hashimi includes detailed chapter summaries and analysis covering 69 chapters, as well as several more in-depth sections of expert-written literary analysis. Featured content includes commentary on major characters, 25 important quotes, essay topics, and key themes like Anxieties of Motherhood in a Patriarchal Society and Naseeb: Destiny, Free Will, and the Ability to Change One's Fate.
Categories:

One Half from the East

One Half from the East

Nadia Hashimi’s first novel for adults, The Pearl That Broke Its Shell, was a bestseller that shares a bacha posh character with One Half from the East.

Author: Nadia Hashimi

Publisher: HarperCollins

ISBN: 9780062421920

Category: Juvenile Fiction

Page: 288

View: 867

Perfect for fans of Rita Williams-Garcia, Thanhha Lai, and Rebecca Stead, internationally bestselling author Nadia Hashimi’s first novel for young readers is a coming-of-age journey set in modern-day Afghanistan that explores life as a bacha posh—a preteen girl dressed as a boy. Obayda’s family is in need of some good fortune, and her aunt has an idea to bring the family luck—dress Obayda, the youngest of four sisters, as a boy, a bacha posh. Life in this in-between place is confusing, but once Obayda meets another bacha posh, everything changes. Their transformation won’t last forever, though—unless the two best friends can figure out a way to make it stick and make their newfound freedoms endure. Nadia Hashimi’s first novel for adults, The Pearl That Broke Its Shell, was a bestseller that shares a bacha posh character with One Half from the East.
Categories: Juvenile Fiction

Sparks Like Stars

Sparks Like Stars

I found myself eagerly following in a way I hadn’t remembered for a long time, impatient for the next twist and turn of the story."—NPR An Afghan American woman returns to Kabul to learn the truth about her family and the tragedy that ...

Author: Nadia Hashimi

Publisher: HarperCollins

ISBN: 9780063008304

Category: Fiction

Page: 476

View: 223

“Suspenseful…emotionally compelling. I found myself eagerly following in a way I hadn’t remembered for a long time, impatient for the next twist and turn of the story."—NPR An Afghan American woman returns to Kabul to learn the truth about her family and the tragedy that destroyed their lives in this brilliant and compelling novel from the bestselling author of The Pearl That Broke Its Shell, The House Without Windows, and When the Moon Is Low. Kabul, 1978: The daughter of a prominent family, Sitara Zamani lives a privileged life in Afghanistan’s thriving cosmopolitan capital. The 1970s are a time of remarkable promise under the leadership of people like Sardar Daoud, Afghanistan’s progressive president, and Sitara’s beloved father, his right-hand man. But the ten-year-old Sitara’s world is shattered when communists stage a coup, assassinating the president and Sitara’s entire family. Only she survives. Smuggled out of the palace by a guard named Shair, Sitara finds her way to the home of a female American diplomat, who adopts her and raises her in America. In her new country, Sitara takes on a new name—Aryana Shepherd—and throws herself into her studies, eventually becoming a renowned surgeon. A survivor, Aryana has refused to look back, choosing instead to bury the trauma and devastating loss she endured. New York, 2008: Thirty years after that fatal night in Kabul, Aryana’s world is rocked again when an elderly patient appears in her examination room—a man she never expected to see again. It is Shair, the soldier who saved her, yet may have murdered her entire family. Seeing him awakens Aryana’s fury and desire for answers—and, perhaps, revenge. Realizing that she cannot go on without finding the truth, Aryana embarks on a quest that takes her back to Kabul—a battleground between the corrupt government and the fundamentalist Taliban—and through shadowy memories of the world she loved and lost. Bold, illuminating, heartbreaking, yet hopeful, Sparks Like Stars is a story of home—of America and Afghanistan, tragedy and survival, reinvention and remembrance, told in Nadia Hashimi’s singular voice.
Categories: Fiction

Muslim Women s Writing from across South and Southeast Asia

Muslim Women   s Writing from across South and Southeast Asia

THE TRADE OF GIVING UP BEING A WOMAN A Transnational Antiracist Reading of Nadia Hashimi's The Pearl That Broke Its Shell Umme Al-Wazedi DOI: 10.4324/9781003248064-10 I was a little girl and then I wasn't. I was a bacha posh and then I ...

Author: Feroza Jussawalla

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 9781000602470

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 332

View: 358

This essential collection examines South and Southeast Asian Muslim women’s writing and the ways they navigate cultural, political, and controversial boundaries. Providing a global, contemporary collection of essays, this volume uses varied methods of analysis and methodology, including: • Contemporary forms of expression, such as memoir, oral accounts, romance novels, poetry, and social media; • Inclusion of both recognized and lesser-known Muslim authors; • Division by theme to shed light on geographical and transnational concerns; and • Regional focus on Afghanistan, Pakistan, India, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Malaysia, and Indonesia. Muslim Women’s Writing from across South and Southeast Asia will deliver crucial scholarship for all readers interested in the varied perspectives and comparisons of Southern Asian writing, enabling both students and scholars alike to become better acquainted with the burgeoning field of Muslim women's writing. This timely and challenging volume aims to give voice to the creative women who are frequently overlooked and unheard.
Categories: Literary Criticism