The New Farmer's Almanac 2015

A Contemporary Compendium for Agrarians, Interventionists, and Patriots of Place

Author: Greenhorns

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780986320507

Category: Reference

Page: 256

View: 5415

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The theme of the second New Farmers Almanac is “Agrarian Technology.” With contributions from more than a hundred authors, artists and other contributors, the Almanac holds a civil, lived testimony from thoughtful agrarians across the continent whose work, life, and behavior patterns beamingly contradict normative values of the macro-economy called America. Agriculture, in principle a pre-requisite for what we now call civilization, seems to have become a portal for deliberate, cultural and joyous retort against it. Historians cite very few agricultural societies that managed without servitude and hierarchy—necessary in order to maintain the irrigation, water-works and infrastructures. Exceptions in commons-based land governance abound in the literature, if not in the prime ecosystems of human habitation: the conical land-sharing of the Hawaiian aina, the 10,000 year corn culture of the Abenaki, the perennial water gardens and spiritual algorithms of paisley-shaped rice paddies. Greenhorns are dedicated to the project of holding space for producer (not consumer) culture; this volume is the sequel to our commitment in this direction. Essays in this volume shoot out like spider-webs across the wide chasm of impossibility—the glorious rescue mission whose daily requirements keep us human, hopeful, and operating inside the scale of possibility. What future can we realistically build together? Will it need electricity? Will it need globalization? Will it continue to require the power of history on our side of exploitation? These practices we've found: biodynamics, permaculture, resilience breeding, state-change in the soil, reformats of ownership, reclaiming the value-chain, re-tooling for diversity, committing to lifetimes of partnership… How long before they allow us to reach steady-state? Do they require interns? Do they require servants making silicon chips? Do they require, absolutely require, the internet? Which technologies are relevant to, appropriate to, and gestating within the new agrarian mind? Through the threshold of our email-box, and into the pages of this volume, some answers have come to this question. In this volume you will find answers to practical questions about institutional forms, and future-making:restoration agro-forestry, reclaiming high desert urban farmland, starting a co-op, pickup truck maintenance, pirate radio utopia, cheap healthcare, farming while pregnant, worksonging, farm terraces, and quite a few more…
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The Untold History of Healing

Plant Lore and Medicinal Magic from the Stone Age to Present

Author: Wolf D. Storl

Publisher: North Atlantic Books

ISBN: 162317094X

Category: Health & Fitness

Page: 344

View: 8677

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The Untold History of Healing takes the reader on a exciting, expansive journey of the history of medicine from the Stone Age to modern times, explaining that Western medicine has its true origins in the healing lore of Paleolithic hunters and gatherers, herding nomads, and the early sedentary farmers rather than in the academic tradition of doctors and pharmacists. This absorbing history of medicine takes the reader on a sweeping journey from the Stone Age to modern times, showing that Western medicine has its origins not only in the academic tradition of doctors and pharmacists, but in the healing lore of Paleolithic hunters and gatherers, herding nomads, and the early sedentary farmers. Anthropologist and ethnobotanist Wolf D. Storl vividly describes the many ways that ancient peoples have used the plants in their immediate environment, along with handed-down knowledge and traditions, to treat the variety of ailments they encountered in daily life.
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Information Technologies and Social Orders

Author: Carl J. Couch

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1351295187

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 312

View: 4226

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According to Carl J. Couch, the history of human society is one of successive, sometimes overlapping, information technologies used to process the various symbolic representations that inform social contexts. Unlike earlier “media” theorists who ignored social context in order to concentrate on the information technologies themselves, Couch implements a consistent theory of interpersonal and intergroup relations to describe the essential interface between information technologies and the social contexts in which they are used. Couch emphasizes the formative capacities of information technologies across historical epochs and cultures, and places them within the major institutional relations of various societies. He views social orders as reflexively shaped by the information technologies that participants use, and as susceptible to mass brutality and oppression due to oligarchic control though he hopes technology will remain humane. The original edition of this manuscript was nearly complete at the time of Couch’s death and was brought to completion by two of his closest associates. Now after two decades, during which its impact is indisputable, it has been updated for a new generation of students and scholars. Additions include discussions on books in the digital age, social media, mobile telephones, recordings, participatory culture, and more.
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A Daybook for March in Yellow Springs, Ohio

A Memoir in Nature

Author: Bill Felker

Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform

ISBN: 9781544631202

Category:

Page: 232

View: 3407

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The format of all my notes in this daybook owes more than a little to the almanacs I wrote and continue to write for the Yellow Springs News between 1984 and 2017. The quotations, daily statistics, the weather outlooks, the seasonal calendar and the daybook journal were and still are part of my regular routine of collecting and organizing impressions about the place in which I live. Setting: The principal habitat described here is that of Glen Helen, a preserve of woods and glades that forms the eastern border of the village of Yellow Springs in southwestern Ohio. Quotations: The passages from ancient and modern writers (and sometimes from my alter egos) which accompany each day's notations are lessons from my readings, as well as from distant seminary and university training, here put to work in service of the reconstruction of my sense of time and space. They are a collection of reminders, hopes, and promises for me that I find implicit in the seasons. They have also become a kind of a cosmological scrapbook for me, as well as the philosophical underpinning of this narrative. Astronomical Data: I have included the sunrise and sunset for Yellow Springs as a general guide to the progression of the year in this location, but those statistics also reflect trends that are world wide. Average Temperatures: Average temperatures in Yellow Springs are also part of each day's entry. Since the rise and fall of temperatures in other parts of the North America keep pace with the temperatures in Yellow Springs, the daybook's highs and lows, like solar statistics, are helpful indicators of the steady progress of the year everywhere. Weather: My daily, weekly and monthly weather summaries have been distilled from over thirty years of observations, and they offer a statistical description of each day. Although information about the Yellow Springs microclimate at first seemed too narrow to be of use to those who lived outside my area, I began to adjust my data to meet the needs of a number of regional and national farm publications for which I started writing in the mid 1980s. And so, while the weather summaries are based on my records in southwestern Ohio, they can be and have been used, with interpretation and interpolation, throughout the Lower Midwest, the Middle Atlantic states and the East. The Natural Calendar: This seasonal summary includes approximate dates for astronomical events such as star movement, meteor showers, solstice, equinox, perihelion (the sun's position closest to Earth) and aphelion (the sun's position farthest from Earth). In this section I note changes in foliage and floral, farm and garden practices, migration times for common birds and peak periods of insect activity. At the beginning of each spring and summer month, I have included a wildflower calendar that lists blooming dates for hundreds of wildflowers in an average Yellow Springs season. Although the flora of the eastern and central United States is hardly limited to the species mentioned here, the flowers listed are common enough to provide easily recognized landmarks for gauging the advance of the year in most areas east of the Mississippi. Daybook: The daybook journal consists of my notes on what I saw happening in nature around me in Yellow Springs between 1979 and 2017. It is a collection of observations made from the window of my car and from my walks in Glen Helen, in other parks and wildlife areas within a few miles of my home, and on occasional trips in the United States and abroad. The cumulative format of the daybook, which brings together all of the annual entries for the same day through the span of over thirty years, has shown me the regularity of the seasons, and it fleshes out a broad, multi faceted picture of each segment of the year. At the same time, this format provides an informal base line for monitoring future changes in local climate.
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A Daybook for September in Yellow Springs, Ohio

A Memoir in Nature

Author: Bill Felker

Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform

ISBN: 9781721729630

Category:

Page: 202

View: 7973

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This ninth volume of A DAYBOOK FOR THE YEAR IN YELLOW SPRINGS, OHIO, is a memoir, extended meditation and guidebook to the month of September in southwestern Ohio, as well as in the Middle Atlantic region and much of the East and Southeast. The DAYBOOK journal itself consists of my notes on what I saw happening around me in Yellow Springs between 1979 and 2017. It is a collection of observations made from the window of my car and from my walks in and around Yellow Springs, in parks and wildlife areas within a few miles of my home and on occasional trips throughout the United States and Europe. My daily, weekly and monthly weather summaries have been distilled from over thirty years of observations, and they offer a statistical description of each day. Although information about the Yellow Springs microclimate at first seemed too narrow to be of use to those who lived outside my area, I found that I could adjust my data to meet the needs of a number of regional and national farm publications for which I started writing in the mid 1980s. Soon I was finding that what had happened in Yellow Springs was applicable to many other parts of the country. In the Natural Calendar sections of the DAYBOOK I note the progress of foliage and floral changes, farm and garden practices, migration times for common birds and peak periods of insect activity. At the beginning of this volume, I have included a floating calendar that lists average blooming dates for wildflowers that blossom between August and September in an average southwestern Ohio season. Although the flora of the United States is hardly limited to the species mentioned here, the flowers listed are common enough to provide easily recognized landmarks for gauging the advance of the year in most areas east of the Mississippi. The cumulative format of the DAYBOOK, which brings together all of the annual entries for the same day through the span of over thirty years, has shown me the regularity of the changes in the seasons, and it fleshes out a broad, multi-faceted picture of each segment of the year. The daily record and the natural calendar summaries, then, are records of moveable seasonal feasts that shift not only according to geographical regions but also according to the weather in any particular year. They are a phenological handbook for the region and a time- exposure narrative of the month. In addition, they can be used as an informal base line for monitoring future changes in local climate. The passages from ancient and modern writers that accompany each day's notations are lessons from my readings, as well as from distant seminary and university training, here put to work in service of the reconstruction of my sense of time and space. They are a collection of reminders, hopes and promises for me that I find implicit in the seasons. They are a kind of a cosmological scrapbook for me and the philosophical underpinning of this narrative.
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A Daybook for June in Yellow Springs, Ohio

A Memoir in Nature

Author: Bill Felker

Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform

ISBN: 9781986757423

Category:

Page: 228

View: 5378

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This sixth volume of A DAYBOOK FOR THE YEAR IN YELLOW SPRINGS, OHIO, is memoir, extended meditation and guidebook to the month of May in southwestern Ohio - as well as in the Middle Atlantic region and much of the East and Southeast. The principal habitat described here is that of Glen Helen, a preserve of woods and glades that forms the eastern border of the village of Yellow Springs in southwestern Ohio. The passages from ancient and modern writers ( which accompany each day's notations are lessons from my readings, as well as from distant seminary and university training, here put to work in service of the reconstruction of my sense of time and space. They are a collection of reminders, hopes and promises for me that I find implicit in the seasons. They have also become a kind of a cosmological scrapbook for me, as well as the philosophical underpinning of this narrative. I have included the sunrise and sunset for Yellow Springs as a general guide to the progression of the year in this location, but those statistics also reflect trends that are world wide. Average temperatures in Yellow Springs are also part of each day's entry. Since the rise and fall of temperatures in other parts of the North America keep pace with the temperatures in Yellow Springs, the highs and lows, like solar statistics, are helpful indicators of the steady progress of the year everywhere. My daily, weekly and monthly weather summaries have been distilled from over thirty years of observations, and they offer a statistical description of each day. Although information about the Yellow Springs microclimate at first seemed too narrow to be of use to those who lived outside my area, I found that I could adjust my data to meet the needs of a number of regional and national farm publications for which I started writing in the mid 1980s. Soon I was finding that what had happened in Yellow Springs was applicable to many other parts of the country. The Natural Calendar sections of this DAYBOOK include approximate dates for astronomical events such as star movement, meteor showers, solstice, equinox, perihelion (the sun's position closest to earth) and aphelion (the sun's position farthest from earth). In this section also I note the progress of foliage and floral changes, farm and garden practices, migration times for common birds and peak periods of insect activity. At the beginning of this volume, I have included a floating calendar that lists average blooming dates for wildflowers that blossom between April and June in an average Yellow Springs season. Although the flora of the eastern and central United States is hardly limited to the species mentioned here, the flowers listed are common enough to provide easily recognized landmarks for gauging the advance of the year in most areas east of the Mississippi. The DAYBOOK journal itself consists of my notes on what I saw happening around me in Yellow Springs between 1979 and 2017. It is a collection of observations made in my yard, from the window of my car and from my walks in Glen Helen, in other parks and wildlife areas within a few miles of my home, and on occasional trips. The cumulative format of the DAYBOOK, which brings together all of the annual entries for the same day through the span of over thirty years, has shown me the regularity of the changes in the seasons, and it fleshes out a broad, multi-faceted picture of each segment of the year. This daily record and the natural calendar summaries, then, are records of moveable seasonal feasts that shift not only according to geographical regions but also according to the weather in any particular year. They are a phenological handbook and guidebook for the days. In addition, they can be used as an informal base line for monitoring future changes in local climate.
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