The Negro as Capitalist

A Study of Banking and Business Among American Negroes

Author: Abram Lincoln Harris

Publisher: Ardent Media

ISBN: N.A

Category: African American banks

Page: 205

View: 2812

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The Negro as Capitalist

A Study of Banking and Business Among American Negroes

Author: Abram Lincoln Harris

Publisher: Ardent Media

ISBN: N.A

Category: African American banks

Page: 205

View: 6238

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A Different Vision

Race and Public Policy

Author: Thomas D Boston

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134798539

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 464

View: 891

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First published in 1996. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
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Consumer Society in American History

A Reader

Author: Lawrence B. Glickman

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 9780801484865

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 420

View: 9037

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This volume offers the most comprehensive and incisive exploration of American consumer history to date, spanning the four centuries from the colonial era to the present.
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Encyclopedia of African American Business

Author: Jessie Carney Smith

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN: 9780313331107

Category: African American business enterprises

Page: 884

View: 6036

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Essays provide information the African American business community and African American business leaders in the United States, from the eighteenth century to the present day.
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Banking on Freedom

Black Women in U.S. Finance Before the New Deal

Author: Shennette Garrett-Scott

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231545215

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 4456

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Between 1888 and 1930, African Americans opened more than a hundred banks and thousands of other financial institutions. In Banking on Freedom, Shennette Garrett-Scott explores this rich period of black financial innovation and its transformative impact on U.S. capitalism through the story of the St. Luke Bank in Richmond, Virginia: the first and only bank run by black women. Banking on Freedom offers an unparalleled account of how black women carved out economic, social, and political power in contexts shaped by sexism, white supremacy, and capitalist exploitation. Garrett-Scott chronicles both the bank’s success and the challenges this success wrought, including extralegal violence and aggressive oversight from state actors who saw black economic autonomy as a threat to both democratic capitalism and the social order. The teller cage and boardroom became sites of activism and resistance as the leadership of president Maggie Lena Walker and other women board members kept the bank grounded in meeting the needs of working-class black women. The first book to center black women’s engagement with the elite sectors of banking, finance, and insurance, Banking on Freedom reveals the ways gender, race, and class shaped the meanings of wealth and risk in U.S. capitalism and society.
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Remaking Respectability

African American Women in Interwar Detroit

Author: Victoria W. Wolcott

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 1469611007

Category: Social Science

Page: 360

View: 9695

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In the early decades of the twentieth century, tens of thousands of African Americans arrived at Detroit's Michigan Central Station, part of the Great Migration of blacks who left the South seeking improved economic and political conditions in the urban North. The most visible of these migrants have been the male industrial workers who labored on the city's automobile assembly lines. African American women have largely been absent from traditional narratives of the Great Migration because they were excluded from industrial work. By placing these women at the center of her study, Victoria Wolcott reveals their vital role in shaping life in interwar Detroit. Wolcott takes us into the speakeasies, settlement houses, blues clubs, storefront churches, employment bureaus, and training centers of Prohibition- and depression-era Detroit. There, she explores the wide range of black women's experiences, focusing particularly on the interactions between working- and middle-class women. As Detroit's black population grew exponentially, women not only served as models of bourgeois respectability, but also began to reshape traditional standards of deportment in response to the new realities of their lives. In so doing, Wolcott says, they helped transform black politics and culture. Eventually, as the depression arrived, female respectability as a central symbol of reform was supplanted by a more strident working-class activism.
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The New Encyclopedia of Southern Culture

Volume 11: Agriculture and Industry

Author: Melissa Walker,James C. Cobb

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 1469616688

Category: Reference

Page: 376

View: 5384

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Volume 11 of The New Encyclopedia of Southern Culture examines the economic culture of the South by pairing two categories that account for the ways many southerners have made their living. In the antebellum period, the wealth of southern whites came largely from agriculture that relied on the forced labor of enslaved blacks. After Reconstruction, the South became attractive to new industries lured by the region's ongoing commitment to low-wage labor and management-friendly economic policies. Throughout the volume, articles reflect the breadth and variety of southern life, paying particular attention to the region's profound economic transformation in recent decades. The agricultural section consists of 25 thematic entries that explore issues such as Native American agricultural practices, plantations, and sustainable agriculture. Thirty-eight shorter pieces cover key crops of the region--from tobacco to Christmas trees--as well as issues of historic and emerging interest--from insects and insecticides to migrant labor. The section on industry and commerce contains 13 thematic entries in which contributors address topics such as the economic impact of military bases, resistance to industrialization, and black business. Thirty-six topical entries explore particular industries, such as textiles, timber, automobiles, and banking, as well as individuals--including Henry W. Grady and Sam M. Walton--whose ideas and enterprises have helped shape the modern South.
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