The Mortal Voice in the Tragedies of Aeschylus

The Mortal Voice in the Tragedies of Aeschylus

It ends with a brief discussion of Aeschylus' Proteus, the satyr play that was performed right after the tragedies of the Oresteia, suggesting that an intimation of the mortal voice can be heard even in a short fragment from this play.

Author: Sarah Nooter

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781108547529

Category: History

Page:

View: 552

Voice connects our embodied existence with the theoretical worlds we construct. This book argues that the voice is a crucial element of mortal identity in the tragedies of Aeschylus. It first presents conceptions of the voice in ancient Greek poetry and philosophy, understanding it in its most literal and physical form, as well as through the many metaphorical connotations that spring from it. Close readings then show how the tragedies and fragments of Aeschylus gain meaning from the rubric and performance of voice, concentrating particularly on the Oresteia. Sarah Nooter demonstrates how voice - as both a bottomless metaphor and performative agent of action - stands as the prevailing configuration through which Aeschylus' dramas should be heard. This highly original book will interest all those interested in classical literature as well as those concerned with material approaches to the interpretation of texts.
Categories: History

The Mortal Voice in the Tragedies of Aeschylus

The Mortal Voice in the Tragedies of Aeschylus

This book argues that the voice is a crucial link between bodies, thought, and mortal identity in the tragedies of Aeschylus.

Author: Sarah Nooter

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781107145511

Category: History

Page: 321

View: 188

This book argues that the voice is a crucial link between bodies, thought, and mortal identity in the tragedies of Aeschylus. It first presents conceptions of the voice in Greek poetry and philosophy and then shows how Aeschylus' tragedies gain meaning from the rubric and performance of voice.
Categories: History

The Oxford Handbook of Voice Studies

The Oxford Handbook of Voice Studies

Voice. Albany: State University of New York Press. Atherton, Catherine. 2005. “Lucretius on What Language Is Not.” In Language and Learning: Philosophy ... The Mortal Voice in the Tragedies of Aeschylus. Cambridge: Cambridge University ...

Author: Nina Eidsheim

Publisher: Oxford Handbooks

ISBN: 9780199982295

Category: Music

Page: 586

View: 845

More than 200 years after the first speaking machine, we are accustomed to voices that speak from any- and everywhere. We interact daily with voices that emit from house alarm systems, cars, telephones, and digital assistants, such as Alexa and Google Home. However, vocal events still have the capacity to raise age-old questions about the human, the animal, the machine, and the spiritual-or in non-metaphysical terms-questions about identity and authenticity. In The Oxford Handbook of Voice Studies, contributors look to the metaphorical voice as well as the clinical understanding of the vocal apparatus to answer the seemingly innocuous question: What is voice? From a range of disciplines including the humanities, biology, culture, and technology studies, contributors draw on the unique methodologies and values each has at hand to address the uses, meanings, practices, theories, methods, and sounds of the voice. Together, they assess the ways that discipline-specific, ontological, and epistemological assumptions of voice need to shift in order to take the findings of other fields into account. This Handbook thus enables a lively discussion as multifaceted and complex as the voice itself has proven to be.
Categories: Music

Theatrical Reenactment in Pindar and Aeschylus

Theatrical Reenactment in Pindar and Aeschylus

The Mortal Voice in the Tragedies of Aeschylus, Cambridge Nünlist, R. 2007. “Pindar and Bacchylides,” in de Jong, I., and Nünlist, R. (eds), Time in Ancient Greek Literature (Leiden), 233–51 2009. The Ancient Critic at Work: Terms and ...

Author: Anna Uhlig

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781108481830

Category: Drama

Page: 319

View: 203

Argues that the songs of Pindar and Aeschylus share a "theatrical" spirit that illuminates choral performance in Classical Greece.
Categories: Drama

Children in Greek Tragedy

Children in Greek Tragedy

'Tragedy, women and the family in Plato's Republic', in P. Destrée and F.-G. Hermann, eds., Plato and the Poets, 175–93. Leiden. Naiden, F. S. 2015. ... The Mortal Voice in the Tragedies of Aeschylus. Cambridge.

Author: Emma M. Griffiths

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780192560568

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 368

View: 592

Astyanax is thrown from the walls of Troy; Medeia kills her children as an act of vengeance against her husband; Aias reflects with sorrow on his son's inheritance, yet kills himself and leaves Eurysakes vulnerable to his enemies. The pathos created by threats to children is a notable feature of Greek tragedy, but does not in itself explain the broad range of situations in which the ancient playwrights chose to employ such threats. Rather than casting children in tragedy as simple figures of pathos, this volume proposes a new paradigm to understand their roles, emphasizing their dangerous potential as the future adults of myth. Although they are largely silent, passive figures on stage, children exert a dramatic force that transcends their limited physical presence, and are in fact theatrically complex creations who pose a danger to the major characters. Their multiple projected lives create dramatic palimpsests which are paradoxically more significant than their immediate emotional effects: children are never killed because of their immediate weakness, but because of their potential strength. This re-evaluation of the significance of child characters in Greek tragedy draws on a fresh examination of the evidence for child actors in fifth-century Athens, which concludes that the physical presence of children was a significant factor in their presentation. However, child roles can only be fully appreciated as theatrical phenomena, utilizing the inherent ambiguities of drama: as such, case studies of particular plays and playwrights are underpinned by detailed analysis of staging considerations, opening up new avenues for interpretation and challenging traditional models of children in tragedy.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Classical Greek Tragedy

Classical Greek Tragedy

McClure, L. (2016) “Priestess and Polis in Euripides' Iphigeneia in Tauris,” in M. Dillon, E. Eidinow, and L. Maurizio (eds), ... Nooter, S. (2017) The Mortal Voice in the Tragedies of Aeschylus, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Author: Judith Fletcher

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781350144583

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 176

View: 407

Classical Greek Tragedy offers a comprehensive survey of the development of classical Greek tragedy combined with close readings of exemplary texts. Reconstructing how audiences in fifth-century BCE Athens created meaning from the performance of tragedy at the dramatic festivals sponsored by the city-state and its wealthiest citizens, it considers the context of Athenian political and legal structures, gender ideology, religious beliefs, and other social forces that contributed to spectators' reception of the drama. In doing so it focuses on the relationship between performers and watchers, not only Athenian male citizens, but also women and audiences throughout the ancient Mediterranean world. This book traces the historical development of these dynamics through three representative tragedies that span a 50 year period: Aeschylus' Seven Against Thebes, Sophocles' Oedipus Tyrannus, and Euripides' Helen. Topics include the role of the chorus; the tragic hero; recurring mythical characters and subject matter; Aristotelian assessments of the components of tragedy; developments in the architecture of the theater and their impact on the interactions of characters, and the spaces they occupy. Unifying these discussions is the observation that the genre articulates a reality beyond the visible stage action that intersects with the characters' existence in the present moment and resonates with the audience's religious beliefs and collective psychology. Human voices within the performance space articulate powerful forces from an invisible dimension that are activated by oaths, hymns, curses and prayers, and respond in the form of oracles and prophecies, forms of discourse which were profoundly meaningful to those who watched the original productions of tragedy.
Categories: Performing Arts

Sex and the Ancient City

Sex and the Ancient City

Nooter, S. (2017), The Mortal Voice in the Tragedies of Aeschylus, Oxford. Oakley, J.H./Sinos, R.H. (1993), The Wedding in Ancient Athens, Madison, WI. O'Daly, G.J.P. (1985), 'Clytemnestra and the Elders: Dramatic Technique in Aeschylus ...

Author: Andreas Serafim

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG

ISBN: 9783110695793

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 551

View: 490

This volume aims to revisit, further explore and tease out the textual, but also non-textual sources in an attempt to reconstruct a clearer picture of a particular aspect of sexuality, i.e. sexual practices, in Greco-Roman antiquity. Sexual practices refers to a part of the overarching notion of sexuality: specifically, the acts of sexual intercourse, the erogenous capacities and genital functions of male and female body, and any other physical or biological actions that define one’s sexual identity or orientation. This volume aims to approach not simply the acts of sexual intercourse themselves, but also their legal, social, political, religious, medical, cultural/moral and interdisciplinary (e.g. emotional, performative) perspectives, as manifested in a range of both textual and non-textual evidence (i.e. architecture, iconography, epigraphy, etc.). The insights taken from the contributions to this volume would enable researchers across a range of disciplines – e.g. sex/gender studies, comparative literature, psychology and cognitive neuroscience – to use theoretical perspectives, methodologies and conceptual tools to frame the sprawling examination of aspects of sexuality in broad terms, or sexual practices in particular.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Sound and the Ancient Senses

Sound and the Ancient Senses

Heroes Sing: Sophocles and the Shifting Soundscape of Tragedy (2012) and The Mortal Voice in the Tragedies of Aeschylus (2017), Stephen Kidd, Nonsense and Meaning in Ancient Greek Comedy (2014), Shane Butler, The Ancient Phonograph ...

Author: Shane Butler

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317300427

Category: History

Page: 290

View: 283

Sound leaves no ruins and no residues, even though it is experienced constantly. It is ubiquitous but fleeting. Even silence has sound, even absence resonates. Sound and the Ancient Senses aims to hear the lost sounds of antiquity, from the sounds of the human body to those of the gods, from the bathhouse to the Forum, from the chirp of a cicada to the music of the spheres. Sound plays so great a role in shaping our environments as to make it a crucial sounding board for thinking about space and ecology, emotions and experience, mortality and the divine, orality and textuality, and the self and its connection to others. From antiquity to the present day, poets and philosophers have strained to hear the ways that sounds structure our world and identities. This volume looks at theories and practices of hearing and producing sounds in ritual contexts, medicine, mourning, music, poetry, drama, erotics, philosophy, rhetoric, linguistics, vocality, and on the page, and shows how ancient ideas of sound still shape how and what we hear today. As the first comprehensive introduction to the soundscapes of antiquity, this volume makes a significant contribution to the burgeoning fields of sound and voice studies and is the final volume of the series, The Senses in Antiquity.
Categories: History

Tragedy and Postcolonial Literature

Tragedy and Postcolonial Literature

For a review of interpretations regarding Philoctetes' cry in the context of such linguistic breakdowns in Greek tragedy in general, see Sarah Nooter, The Mortal Voice in the Tragedies of Aeschylus (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press ...

Author: Ato Quayson

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781108830980

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 347

View: 796

Provides a new way of reading Western tragedy alongside texts from the postcolonial world so as to cross-illuminate each other.
Categories: Literary Criticism

The Oxford Handbook of Timbre

The Oxford Handbook of Timbre

The Mortal Voice in the Tragedies of Aeschylus. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2017. Peponi, Anastasia-Erasmia. Frontiers of Pleasure: Models of Aesthetic Response in Archaic and Classical Greek Thought.

Author: Emily I. Dolan

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780190637255

Category: Music

Page: 600

View: 914

Despite its importance as a central feature of musical sounds, timbre has rarely stood in the limelight. First defined in the eighteenth century, denigrated during the nineteenth, the concept of timbre came into its own during the twentieth century and its fascination with synthesizers and electronic music-or so the story goes. But in fact, timbre cuts across all the boundaries that make up musical thought-combining scientific and artistic approaches to music, material and philosophical aspects, and historical and theoretical perspectives. Timbre challenges us to fundamentally reorganize the way we think about music. The twenty-five essays that make up this collection offer a variety of engagements with music from the perspective of timbre. The boundaries are set as broad as possible: from ancient Homeric sounds to contemporary sound installations, from birdsong to cochlear implants, from Tuvan overtone singing to the tv show The Voice, from violin mutes to Moog synthesizers. What unifies the essays across this vast diversity is the material starting point of the sounding object. This focus on the listening experience is radical departure from the musical work that has traditionally dominated musical discourse since its academic inception in late-nineteenth-century Europe. Timbre remains a slippery concept that has continuously demanded more, be it more precise vocabulary, a more systematic theory, or more rigorous analysis. Rooted in the psychology of listening, timbre consistently resists pinning complete down. This collection of essays provides an invitation for further engagement with the range of fascinating questions that timbre opens up.
Categories: Music