The Man Behind the Microchip

Robert Noyce and the Invention of Silicon Valley

Author: Leslie Berlin

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 019531199X

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 402

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The triumphs and setbacks of inventor and entrepreneur Robert Noyce are illuminated in a biography that describes his colorful life in context of the evolution of the high-tech industry and the complex interrelationships among technology, business, big money, politics, and culture in Silicon Valley.
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The Innovators

How a Group of Hackers, Geniuses, and Geeks Created the Digital Revolution

Author: Walter Isaacson

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1476708703

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 560

View: 8530

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"Following his blockbuster biography of Steve Jobs, The Innovators is Walter Isaacson's revealing story of the people who created the computer and the Internet. It is destined to be the standard history of the digital revolution and an indispensable guide to how innovation really happens. What were the talents that allowed certain inventors and entrepreneurs to turn their visionary ideas into disruptive realities? What led to their creative leaps? Why did some succeed and others fail? In his masterly saga, Isaacson begins with Ada Lovelace, Lord Byron's daughter, who pioneered computer programming in the 1840s. He explores the fascinating personalities that cr eated our current digital revolution, such as Vannevar Bush, Alan Turing, John von Neumann, J.C.R. Licklider, Doug Engelbart, Robert Noyce, Bill Gates, Steve Wozniak, Steve Jobs, Tim Berners-Lee, and Larry Page. This is the story of how their minds worked and what made them so inventive. It's also a narrative of how their ability to collaborate and master the art of teamwork made them even more creative. For an era that seeks to foster innovation, creativity, and teamwork, The Innovators shows how they happen"--
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The chip war

the battle for the world of tomorrow

Author: Fred Warshofsky

Publisher: Scribner

ISBN: N.A

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 434

View: 8806

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Discusses the economic and strategic importance of computer chips, describes the reasons for Japan's manufacturing superiority, and looks at response of the American semiconductor industry
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Makers of the Microchip

A Documentary History of Fairchild Semiconductor

Author: Christophe Lécuyer,David C. Brock,Jay Last

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN: 9780262294324

Category: Computers

Page: 328

View: 7752

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In the first three and a half years of its existence, Fairchild Semiconductor developed, produced, and marketed the device that would become the fundamental building block of the digital world: the microchip. Founded in 1957 by eight former employees of the Schockley Semiconductor Laboratory, Fairchild created the model for a successful Silicon Valley start-up: intense activity with a common goal, close collaboration, and a quick path to the market (Fairchild's first device hit the market just ten months after the company's founding). Fairchild Semiconductor was one of the first companies financed by venture capital, and its success inspired the establishment of venture capital firms in the San Francisco Bay area. These firms would finance the explosive growth of Silicon Valley over the next several decades. This history of the early years of Fairchild Semiconductor examines the technological, business, and social dynamics behind its innovative products. The centerpiece of the book is a collection of documents, reproduced in facsimile, including the company's first prospectus; ideas, sketches, and plans for the company's products; and a notebook kept by cofounder Jay Last that records problems, schedules, and tasks discussed at weekly meetings. A historical overview, interpretive essays, and an introduction to semiconductor technology in the period accompany these primary documents.
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Cities of Knowledge

Cold War Science and the Search for the Next Silicon Valley

Author: Margaret Pugh O'Mara

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9780691117164

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 298

View: 5848

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What is the magic formula for turning a place into a high-tech capital? How can a city or region become a high-tech powerhouse like Silicon Valley? For over half a century, through boom times and bust, business leaders and politicians have tried to become "the next Silicon Valley," but few have succeeded. This book examines why high-tech development became so economically important late in the twentieth century, and why its magic formula of people, jobs, capital, and institutions has been so difficult to replicate. Margaret O'Mara shows that high-tech regions are not simply accidental market creations but "cities of knowledge"--planned communities of scientific production that were shaped and subsidized by the original venture capitalist, the Cold War defense complex. At the heart of the story is the American research university, an institution enriched by Cold War spending and actively engaged in economic development. The story of the city of knowledge broadens our understanding of postwar urban history and of the relationship between civil society and the state in late twentieth-century America. It leads us to further redefine the American suburb as being much more than formless "sprawl," and shows how it is in fact the ultimate post-industrial city. Understanding this history and geography is essential to planning for the future of the high-tech economy, and this book is must reading for anyone interested in building the next Silicon Valley.
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Digital Rubbish

A Natural History of Electronics

Author: Jennifer Gabrys

Publisher: University of Michigan Press

ISBN: 0472035371

Category: Science

Page: 225

View: 7122

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"This is a study of the material life of information and its devices; of electronic waste in its physical and electronic incarnations; a cultural and material mapping of the spaces where electronics in the form of both hardware and information accumulate, break down, or are stowed away. Electronic waste occurs not just in the form of discarded computers but also as a scatter of information devices, software, and systems that are rendered obsolete and fail. Where other studies have addressed "digital" technology through a focus on its immateriality or virtual qualities, Gabrys traces the material, spatial, cultural, and political infrastructures that enable the emergence and dissolution of these technologies. In the course of her book, she explores five interrelated "spaces" where electronics fall apart: from Silicon Valley to Nasdaq, from containers bound for China to museums and archives that preserve obsolete electronics as cultural artifacts, to the landfill as material repository. All together, these sites stack up into a sedimentary record that forms the "natural history" of this study. Digital Rubbish: A Natural History of Electronics describes the materiality of electronics from a unique perspective, examining the multiple forms of waste that electronics create as evidence of the resources, labor, and imaginaries that are bundled into these machines. By drawing on the material analysis developed by Walter Benjamin, this natural history method allows for an inquiry into electronics that focuses neither on technological progression nor on great inventors but rather considers the ways in which electronic technologies fail and decay. Ranging across studies of media and technology, as well as environments, geography, and design, Jennifer Gabrys pulls together the far-reaching material and cultural processes that enable the making and breaking of these technologies"--Publisher's description.
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Making the American Century

Essays on the Political Culture of Twentieth Century America

Author: Bruce J. Schulman

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199323968

Category: History

Page: 336

View: 8212

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The twentieth century has been popularly seen as "the American Century," a long period in which the United States had amassed the economic resources, the political and military strength, and the moral prestige to assume global leadership. By century's end, the trajectory of American politics, the sense of ever waxing federal power, and the nation's place in the world seemed less assured. Americans of many stripes came to contest the standard narratives of nation building and international hegemony charted by generations of historians. In this volume, a group of distinguished U.S. historians confronts the teleological view of the inexorable transformation of the United States into a modern nation. The contributors analyze a host of ways in which local places were drawn into a wider polity and culture, while at the same time revealing how national and international structures and ideas created new kinds of local movements and local energies. Rather than seeing the century as a series of conflicts between liberalism and conservatism, they illustrate the ways in which each of these political forces shaped its efforts over the other's cumulative achievements, accommodating to shifts in government, social mores, and popular culture. They demonstrate that international connections have transformed domestic life in myriad ways and, in turn, that the American presence in the world has been shaped by its distinctive domestic political culture. Finally, they break down boundaries between the public and private sectors, showcasing the government's role in private life and how private organizations influenced national politics. Revisiting and revising many of the chestnuts of American political history, this volume challenges received wisdom about the twentieth-century American experience.
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Troublemakers

How a Generation of Silicon Valley Upstarts Invented the Future

Author: Leslie Berlin

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1849838720

Category: Social Science

Page: 448

View: 6402

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**THE FINANCIAL TIMES BUSINESS BOOK OF THE MONTH** THE GRIPPING TALE OF THE EARLY FRONTIER DAYS OF SILICON VALLEY FROM ACCLAIMED HISTORIAN LESLIE BERLIN. 'The book is compelling as it maps out the building of the Valley, the challenges its early tech pioneers faced, as well as highlighting those who reached dizzying success only to suffer as the dot com bubble burst.' Financial Times ‘Kaleidoscopic, ambitious, and brilliant, the book draws on a dazzling cast of characters to chart the rise of the five industries that have come to define technology today and, collectively, to remake the world.’ Eric Schmidt, former CEO of Google and Executive Chairman of Alphabet, Inc. Leslie Berlin's previous work has been acclaimed by the New York Times: 'so engagingly narrated that you don't realize how much business and technology you are learning along the way.' Between 1968 and 1976, five landmark industries that shaped the modern world were launched within 30 miles of each other: personal computing, video games, biotechnology, modern venture capital and advanced semi-conductor logic. The dominant players in many of those industries - firms like Apple and Intel - had also been launched at the same time. During those early days of Silicon Valley, the first ARPANET transmission (now known as the Internet) came into a Stanford lab, universities began licensing innovations to businesses, and the Silicon Valley tech community began to develop their lobbying clout. Now, for the first time, the stories of the men and women who changed the world during these pivotal years are brought to life in rich detail by respected Silicon Valley historian Leslie Berlin. Berlin shines a light on the wild frontier days of Silicon Valley where the old rules were broken, revealing how the modern tech world was built and empires were forged. Troublemakers is a compelling story of the upstarts of Silicon Valley that will appeal to fans of HBO's Silicon Valley and Walter Isaacson's biography of Steve Jobs. Further praise for Troublemakers: ‘Leslie Berlin combines the keen observations of an historian with gorgeous writing and riveting storytelling to write the landmark book on the Valley. The interwoven lives of wonderfully iconoclastic characters bring the formative years of the Valley to life with sheer brilliance. Troublemakers is a must-read for anyone hoping to understand America’s tech capital.’ Julia Flynn Siler, New York Times bestselling author of The House of Mondavi ‘Leslie Berlin has done it again. Following on her richly informative biography of Intel co-founder Robert Noyce, The Man Behind the Microchip, Berlin now brings us a definitive account of Silicon Valley’s “breakthrough years” in the 1970s. Troublemakers recounts the fascinating careers of seven little-known but enormously impactful players who shaped the Valley’s unique high-tech ecosystem. As entertaining as it is authoritative, Troublemakers is required reading for anyone seeking to understand how the tech revolution took root in the San Francisco Bay Area and eventually transformed the entire planet’s way of life.’ David M. Kennedy, Donald J. McLachlan Professor of History Emeritus at Stanford University, winner of the Pulitzer Prize
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Spinoff

a personal history of the industry that changed the world

Author: Charles E. Sporck,Richard L. Molay

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Computers

Page: 281

View: 4109

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