The Lifeways of Hunter Gatherers

The Lifeways of Hunter Gatherers

Challenges the preconceptions that hunter-gatherers were Paleolithic relics living in a raw state of nature, instead crafting a position that emphasizes their diversity.

Author: Robert L. Kelly

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781107024878

Category: History

Page: 362

View: 262

Challenges the preconceptions that hunter-gatherers were Paleolithic relics living in a raw state of nature, instead crafting a position that emphasizes their diversity.
Categories: History

The Foraging Spectrum

The Foraging Spectrum

By considering the actual, not imagined, reasons behind diverse behaviour this book argues for a revision of many archaeological models of prehistory. From the reviews "[A]n excellent overview of key issues in hunter-gatherer studies.

Author: Robert L. Kelly

Publisher:

ISBN: 0975273884

Category: Social Science

Page: 446

View: 624

The author wrote this book primarily for his archaeology students, to show them how dangerous anthropological analogy is and how variable the actual practices of foragers of the recent past and today are. His survey of anthropological literature points to differences in foraging societies' patterns of diet, mobility, sharing, land tenure, exchange, gender relations, division of labour, marriage, descent and political organisation. By considering the actual, not imagined, reasons behind diverse behaviour this book argues for a revision of many archaeological models of prehistory.
Categories: Social Science

Hunter Gatherers

Hunter Gatherers

Chapter 6 of this edition includes a fresh perspective on Marxist thought in hunter
-gatherer studies. Chapter 7 (Neo-Darwinian Theory) has ... The lifeways of
hunter-gatherers: The foraging spectrum. Cambridge: Cambridge University
Press.

Author: Robert L. Bettinger

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9781489975812

Category: Social Science

Page: 304

View: 874

Hunter-gatherer research has played a historically central role in the development of anthropological and evolutionary theory. Today, research in this traditional and enduringly vital field blurs lines of distinction between archaeology and ethnology, and seeks instead to develop perspectives and theories broadly applicable to anthropology and its many sub disciplines. In the groundbreaking first edition of Hunter-Gatherers: Archaeological and Evolutionary Theory (1991), Robert Bettinger presented an integrative perspective on hunter-gatherer research and advanced a theoretical approach compatible with both traditional anthropological and contemporary evolutionary theories. Hunter-Gatherers remains a well-respected and much-cited text, now over 20 years since initial publication. Yet, as in other vibrant fields of study, the last two decades have seen important empirical and theoretical advances. In this second edition of Hunter-Gatherers, co-authors Robert Bettinger, Raven Garvey, and Shannon Tushingham offer a revised and expanded version of the classic text, which includes a succinct and provocative critical synthesis of hunter-gatherer and evolutionary theory, from the Enlightenment to the present. New and expanded sections relate and react to recent developments—some of them the authors’ own—particularly in the realms of optimal foraging and cultural transmission theories. An exceptionally informative and ambitious volume on cultural evolutionary theory, Hunter-Gatherers, second edition, is an essential addition to the libraries of anthropologists, archaeologists, and human ecologists alike.
Categories: Social Science

The Diversity of Hunter Gatherer Pasts

The Diversity of Hunter Gatherer Pasts

Kelly, R. L. (1995) The Foraging Spectrum: Diversity in Hunter-gatherer Lifeways.
London, Smithsonian Institute Press. Kelly R. L. (2013) The lifeways of Hunter-
Gatherers: The Foraging Spectrum. Cambridge, Cambridge University Press.

Author: Bill Finlayson

Publisher: Oxbow Books Limited

ISBN: 9781785705892

Category: History

Page: 192

View: 357

This thought provoking collection of new research papers explores the extent of variation amongst hunting and gathering peoples past and present and the considerable analytical challenges presented by this diversity. This problem is especially important in archaeology, where increasing empirical evidence illustrates ways of life that are not easily encompassed within the range of variation recognised in the contemporary world of surviving hunter-gatherers. Put simply, how do past hunter-gatherers fit into our understandings of hunter-gatherers? Furthermore, given the inevitable archaeological reliance on analogy, it is important to ask whether conceptions of hunter-gatherers based on contemporary societies restrict our comprehension of past diversity and of how this changes over the long term. Discussion of hunter-gatherers shows them to be varied and flexible, but modelling of contemporary hunter-gatherers has not only reduced them into essential categories, but has also portrayed them as static and without history.It is often said that the study of hunter-gatherers can provide insight into past forms of social organisation and behaviour; unfortunately too often it has limited our understandings of these societies. In contrast, contributors here explore past hunter-gather diversity over time and space to provide critical perspectives on general models of ‘hunter-gatherers’ and attempt to provide new perspectives on hunter-gatherer societies from the greater diversity present in the past.
Categories: History

Foraging in the Past

Foraging in the Past

Kelly, Robert. 1995. The Foraging Spectrum: Diversity in Hunter-Gatherer
Lifeways. Washington, DC: Smithsonian Institution Press. Kelly, Robert. 2013.
The Lifeways of Hunter-Gatherers: The Foraging Spectrum. Cambridge, UK:
Cambridge ...

Author: Lemke

Publisher: University Press of Colorado

ISBN: 9781607327745

Category: Social Science

Page: 296

View: 100

The label “hunter-gatherer” covers an extremely diverse range of societies and behaviors, yet most of what is known is provided by ethnographic and historical data that cannot be used to interpret prehistory. Foraging in the Past takes an explicitly archaeological approach to the potential of the archaeological record to document the variability and time depth of hunter-gatherers. Well-established and young scholars present new prehistoric data and describe new methods and theories to investigate ancient forager lifeways and document hunter-gatherer variability across the globe. The authors use relationships established by cross-cultural data as a background for examining the empirical patterns of prehistory. Covering underwater sites in North America, the peaks of the Andes, Asian rainforests, and beyond, chapters are data rich, methodologically sound, and theoretically nuanced, effectively exploring the latest evidence for behavioral diversity in the fundamental process of hunting and gathering. Foraging in the Past establishes how hunter-gatherers can be considered archaeologically, extending beyond the reach of ethnographers and historians to argue that only through archaeological research can the full range of hunter-gatherer variability be documented. Presenting a comprehensive and integrated approach to forager diversity in the past, the volume will be of significance to both students and scholars working with or teaching about hunter-gatherers. Contributors: Nicholas J. Conard, Raven Garvey, Keiko Kitagawa, John Krigbaum, Petra Krönneck, Steven Kuhn, Julia Lee-Thorp, Peter Mitchell, Katherine Moore, Susanne C. Münzel, Kurt Rademaker, Patrick Roberts, Britt Starkovich, Brian A. Stewart, Mary Stiner
Categories: Social Science

Archaeology

Archaeology

This text pairs two of archaeology's most recognized names: Robert L. Kelly and David Hurst Thomas, who together have over seventy years of experience leading excavations.

Author: Robert L. Kelly

Publisher: Cengage Learning

ISBN: 9781111829995

Category: Social Science

Page: 512

View: 365

This text pairs two of archaeology's most recognized names: Robert L. Kelly and David Hurst Thomas, who together have over seventy years of experience leading excavations. The sixth edition of ARCHAEOLOGY reflects the most recent research and changes in the field, while covering core concepts in an exceptionally student-friendly fashion by using personalized examples and high-interest topics. This edition continues a tradition of combining academic rigor with an engaging writing style that has made Kelly and Thomas's ARCHAEOLOGY one of the most well-respected and best-selling texts in the discipline. The rich array of supplemental resources includes a book companion website, as well as the option to use the authors' DOING FIELDWORK: ARCHAEOLOGICAL DEMONSTRATIONS 2.0 CD-ROM. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.
Categories: Social Science

Archaeology Down to Earth

Archaeology  Down to Earth

This new brief edition pairs two of archaeology's most recognized names -- David Hurst Thomas of the American Museum of Natural History and Robert L. Kelly of the University of Wyoming.

Author: Robert L. Kelly

Publisher: Cengage Learning

ISBN: 9781133608646

Category: Social Science

Page: 304

View: 305

This new brief edition pairs two of archaeology's most recognized names -- David Hurst Thomas of the American Museum of Natural History and Robert L. Kelly of the University of Wyoming. Their well-chosen examples show how archaeologists have worked through actual problems in the field and in the lab. After using this book, readers will be better able to ask questions, solve problems, and discern truth from fiction. They will learn about the nature of archaeological data and how archaeologists do such things as archaeological survey and excavation. They also will develop their sense of scientific logic and gain a better understanding of career opportunities available to archaeologists. This edition's enhanced full-color design improves the visual presentation and enables users to more clearly see the key points of an image. A rich array of supplemental resources includes a new companion website, as well as the option to use the Doing Fieldwork: Archaeological Demonstrations CD-ROM, Version 2.0, also developed by the authors. Available with InfoTrac Student Collections http://gocengage.com/infotrac. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.
Categories: Social Science

Beyond War

Beyond War

36, 37, 38; Marlowe, ”Huntergatherers and human evolution,” 60. ... (Cambridge:
Harvard University Press, 1999), 67; Robert Kelly, The Foraging Spectrum:
Diversity in HunterGatherer Lifeways (Washington, D.C.: Smithsonian Institution
Press ...

Author: Douglas P. Fry

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199885862

Category: Social Science

Page: 352

View: 251

A profoundly heartening view of human nature, Beyond War offers a hopeful prognosis for a future without war. Douglas P. Fry convincingly argues that our ancient ancestors were not innately warlike--and neither are we. He points out that, for perhaps ninety-nine percent of our history, for well over a million years, humans lived in nomadic hunter-and-gatherer groups, egalitarian bands where warfare was a rarity. Drawing on archaeology and fascinating recent fieldwork on hunter-gatherer bands from around the world, Fry debunks the idea that war is ancient and inevitable. For instance, among Aboriginal Australians, warfare was an extreme anomaly. Fry also points out that even today, when war seems ever present, the vast majority of us live peaceful, nonviolent lives. We are not as warlike as we think, and if we can learn from our ancestors, we may be able to move beyond war to provide real justice and security for the world.
Categories: Social Science

Time and Complexity in Historical Ecology

Time and Complexity in Historical Ecology

The Foraging Spectrum: Diversity in Hunter-Gatherer Lifeways. Washington, D.C.
: Smithsonian Institution Press. Lee, R. B. 1968. What hunters do for a living, or
how to make out on scarce resources. In R. B. Lee and I. Devore, eds., Man the ...

Author: William L. Balée

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 9780231509619

Category: Science

Page: 432

View: 750

This collection of studies by anthropologists, botanists, ecologists, and biologists is an important contribution to the emerging field of historical ecology. The book combines cutting-edge research with new perspectives to emphasize the close relationship between humans and their natural environment. Contributors examine how alterations in the natural world mirror human cultures, societies, and languages. Treating the landscape like a text, these researchers decipher patterns and meaning in the Ecuadorian Andes, Amazonia, the desert coast of Peru, and other regions in the neotropics. They show how local peoples have changed the landscape over time to fit their needs by managing and modifying species diversity, enhancing landscape heterogeneity, and controlling ecological disturbance. In turn, the environment itself becomes a form of architecture rich with historical and archaeological significance. Time and Complexity in Historical Ecology explores thousands of years of ecological history while also addressing important contemporary issues, such as biodiversity and genetic variation and change. Engagingly written and expertly researched, this book introduces and exemplifies a unique method for better understanding the link between humans and the biosphere.
Categories: Science

Hunters Herders and Hamburgers

Hunters  Herders  and Hamburgers

2. Jean Jacques Rousseau, The Social Contract and Discourses (London: J. M.
Dent, n.d.), 207. 3. Robert L. Kelly, The Foraging Spectrum: Diversity in Hunter-
Gatherer Lifeways (Washington: Smithsonian Institution Press, 1995), 296. 4. Ibid
.

Author: Richard W. Bulliet

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 9780231503969

Category: History

Page: 264

View: 751

Richard W. Bulliet has long been a leading figure in the study of human-animal relations, and in his newest work, Hunters, Herders, and Hamburgers, he offers a sweeping and engaging perspective on this dynamic relationship from prehistory to the present. By considering the shifting roles of donkeys, camels, cows, and other domesticated animals in human society, as well as their place in the social imagination, Bulliet reveals the different ways various cultures have reinforced, symbolized, and rationalized their relations with animals. Bulliet identifies and explores four stages in the history of the human-animal relationship-separation, predomesticity, domesticity, and postdomesticity. He begins with the question of when and why humans began to consider themselves distinct from other species and continues with a fresh look at how a few species became domesticated. He demonstrates that during the domestic era many species fell from being admired and even worshipped to being little more than raw materials for various animal-product industries. Throughout the work, Bulliet discusses how social and technological developments and changing philosophical, religious, and aesthetic viewpoints have shaped attitudes toward animals. Our relationship to animals continues to evolve in the twenty-first century. Bulliet writes, "We are today living through a new watershed in human-animal relations, one that appears likely to affect our material, social, and imaginative lives as profoundly as did the original emergence of domestic species." The United States, Britain, and a few other countries are leading a move from domesticity, marked by nearly universal familiarity with domestic species, to an era of postdomesticity, in which dependence on animal products continues but most people have no contact with producing animals. Elective vegetarianism and the animal-liberation movement have combined with new attitudes toward animal science, pets, and the presentation of animals in popular culture to impart a distinctive moral, psychological, and spiritual tone to postdomestic life.
Categories: History

Everyone Eats

Everyone Eats

The Foraging Spectrum: Diversity in Hunter-Gatherer Lifeways. Washington, DC:
Smithsonian Institution Press. Keys, Ancel. 1980. Seven Countries. Cambridge,
MA: Harvard University Press. Kennedy, Diana. 1998. My Mexico: A Culinary ...

Author: E. N. Anderson

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 9780814704950

Category: Social Science

Page: 295

View: 612

Florence Nightingale (1820-1920) is famous as the heroine of the Crimean War and later as a campaigner for health care founded on a clean environment and good nursing. Though best known for her pioneering demonstration that disease rather than wounds killed most soldiers, she was also heavily allied to social reform movements and to feminist protest against the enforced idleness of middle-class women. This original edition provides bold new insights into Nightingale's beliefs and a new picture of the relationship between feminism and religion. Suggestions for Thought to the Searchers after Truth Among the Artisans of England (1860), which contains the novel Cassandra, is a central text in 19th-century history of feminist thought and is published here for the first time. Nightingale argues that work was the means by which every individual sought self-fulfillment and served God. She wrote influentially about the group most Victorians declared to be above work: unmarried, middle-class women.
Categories: Social Science

On the Move

On the Move

Systematic foraging by a nectar - feeding bird , the Amakihi ( Loxops virens ) . J .
Comp . Physiol . Psychol . 92 : 388 – 96 . ... The foraging spectrum : Diversity in
hunter - gatherer lifeways . Washington , DC : Smithsonian Institution Press .

Author: Sue Boinski

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 0226063402

Category: Nature

Page: 811

View: 770

Getting from here to there may be simple for one individual. But as any parent, scout leader, or CEO knows, herding a whole troop in one direction is a lot more complicated. Who leads the group? Who decides where the group will travel, and using what information? How do they accomplish these tasks? On the Move addresses these questions, examining the social, cognitive, and ecological processes that underlie patterns and strategies of group travel. Chapters discuss how factors such as group size, resource distribution and availability, the costs of travel, predation, social cohesion, and cognitive skills affect how individuals as well as social groups exploit their environment. Most chapters focus on field studies of a wide range of human and nonhuman primate groups, from squirrel monkeys to Turkana pastoralists, but chapters covering group travel in hyenas, birds, dolphins, and bees provide a broad taxonomic perspective and offer new insights into comparative questions, such as whether primates are unique in their ability to coordinate group-level activities.
Categories: Nature

The Drama of the Commons

The Drama of the Commons

Kelly, R.L. 1995 The Foraging Spectrum: Diversity in Hunter-Gatherer Lifeways.
Washington, DC: Smithsonian Institution Press. Kennedy, P.M. 1987 The Rise
and Fall of the Great Powers: Economic Change and Military Conflict from 1500
to ...

Author: National Research Council

Publisher: National Academies Press

ISBN: 0309169984

Category: Social Science

Page: 533

View: 837

The "tragedy of the commons" is a central concept in human ecology and the study of the environment. It has had tremendous value for stimulating research, but it only describes the reality of human-environment interactions in special situations. Research over the past thirty years has helped clarify how human motivations, rules governing access to resources, the structure of social organizations, and the resource systems themselves interact to determine whether or not the many dramas of the commons end happily. In this book, leaders in the field review the evidence from several disciplines and many lines of research and present a state-of-the-art assessment. They summarize lessons learned and identify the major challenges facing any system of governance for resource management. They also highlight the major challenges for the next decade: making knowledge development more systematic; understanding institutions dynamically; considering a broader range of resources (such as global and technological commons); and taking into account the effects of social and historical context. This book will be a valuable and accessible introduction to the field for students and a resource for advanced researchers.
Categories: Social Science

Human Ecology of Beringia

Human Ecology of Beringia

The foraging spectrum: Diversity in hunter-gatherer lifeways. Washington, D.C.:
Smithsonian Institution. Kind, N.V. 1974. Geokhronologiya pozdnego
antropologena po izotopnym dannym. Moscow: Nauka. King, Maureen L., and
Sergei B.

Author: John F. Hoffecker

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 9780231503884

Category: Science

Page: 304

View: 976

Twenty-five thousand years ago, sea level fell more than 400 feet below its present position as a consequence of the growth of immense ice sheets in the Northern Hemisphere. A dry plain stretching 1,000 miles from the Arctic Ocean to the Aleutians became exposed between northeast Asia and Alaska, and across that plain, most likely, walked the first people of the New World. This book describes what is known about these people and the now partly submerged land, named Beringia, which they settled during the final millennia of the Ice Age. Humans first occupied Beringia during a twilight period when rising sea levels had not yet caught up with warming climates. Although the land bridge between northeast Asia and Alaska was still present, warmer and wetter climates were rapidly transforming the Beringian steppe into shrub tundra. This volume synthesizes current research-some previously unpublished-on the archaeological sites and rapidly changing climates and biota of the period, suggesting that the absence of woody shrubs to help fire bone fuel may have been the barrier to earlier settlement, and that from the outset the Beringians developed a postglacial economy similar to that of later northern interior peoples. The book opens with a review of current research and the major problems and debates regarding the environment and archaeology of Beringia. It then describes Beringian environments and the controversies surrounding their interpretation; traces the evolving adaptations of early humans to the cold environments of northern Eurasia, which set the stage for the settlement of Beringia; and provides a detailed account of the archaeological record in three chapters, each of which is focused on a specific slice of time between 15,000 and 11,500 years ago. In conclusion, the authors present an interpretive summary of the human ecology of Beringia and discuss its relationship to the wider problem of the peopling of the New World.
Categories: Science

What Technology Wants

What Technology Wants

(1995) The Foraging Spectrum: Diversity in Hunter-Gatherer Lifeways.
Washington, DC: Smithsonian Institution Press. (in war between tribes):
Lawrence H. Keeley (1997) War Before Civilization. New York: Oxford University
Press, p. 89.

Author: Kevin Kelly

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 1101444460

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 416

View: 288

From the author of the New York Times bestseller The Inevitable— a sweeping vision oftechnology as a living force that can expand our individual potential This provocative book introduces a brand-new view of technology. It suggests that technology as a whole is not a jumble of wires and metal but a living, evolving organism that has its own unconscious needs and tendencies. Kevin Kelly looks out through the eyes of this global technological system to discover "what it wants." He uses vivid examples from the past to trace technology's long course and then follows a dozen trajectories of technology into the near future to project where technology is headed. This new theory of technology offers three practical lessons: By listening to what technology wants we can better prepare ourselves and our children for the inevitable technologies to come. By adopting the principles of pro-action and engagement, we can steer technologies into their best roles. And by aligning ourselves with the long-term imperatives of this near-living system, we can capture its full gifts. Written in intelligent and accessible language, this is a fascinating, innovative, and optimistic look at how humanity and technology join to produce increasing opportunities in the world and how technology can give our lives greater meaning. From the Hardcover edition.
Categories: Technology & Engineering

A Farewell to Alms

A Farewell to Alms

The Foraging Spectrum: Diversity in Hunter-Gatherer Lifeways. Washington, D.C.
: Smithsonian Institution Press. Kirkaldy, Adam W. 1914. British Shipping: Its
History, Organization and Importance. London: Kegan Paul, Trench, Trubner.
Knauft ...

Author: Gregory Clark

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 1400827817

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 432

View: 920

Why are some parts of the world so rich and others so poor? Why did the Industrial Revolution--and the unprecedented economic growth that came with it--occur in eighteenth-century England, and not at some other time, or in some other place? Why didn't industrialization make the whole world rich--and why did it make large parts of the world even poorer? In A Farewell to Alms, Gregory Clark tackles these profound questions and suggests a new and provocative way in which culture--not exploitation, geography, or resources--explains the wealth, and the poverty, of nations. Countering the prevailing theory that the Industrial Revolution was sparked by the sudden development of stable political, legal, and economic institutions in seventeenth-century Europe, Clark shows that such institutions existed long before industrialization. He argues instead that these institutions gradually led to deep cultural changes by encouraging people to abandon hunter-gatherer instincts-violence, impatience, and economy of effort-and adopt economic habits-hard work, rationality, and education. The problem, Clark says, is that only societies that have long histories of settlement and security seem to develop the cultural characteristics and effective workforces that enable economic growth. For the many societies that have not enjoyed long periods of stability, industrialization has not been a blessing. Clark also dissects the notion, championed by Jared Diamond in Guns, Germs, and Steel, that natural endowments such as geography account for differences in the wealth of nations. A brilliant and sobering challenge to the idea that poor societies can be economically developed through outside intervention, A Farewell to Alms may change the way global economic history is understood.
Categories: Business & Economics

Landscape of the Mind

Landscape of the Mind

Nature 293 (1981): 464–466. Kelly, Robert L. The Foraging Spectrum: Diversity
in Hunter-Gatherer Lifeways. Washington, D.C.: Smithsonian Institution Press,
1995. Kemp, Barry J. Ancient Egypt: Anatomy of a Civilization. London:
Routledge ...

Author: John F. Hoffecker

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 9780231518482

Category: Social Science

Page: 288

View: 903

In Landscape of the Mind, John F. Hoffecker explores the origin and growth of the human mind, drawing on archaeology, history, and the fossil record. He suggests that, as an indirect result of bipedal locomotion, early humans developed a feedback relationship among their hands, brains, and tools that evolved into the capacity to externalize thoughts in the form of shaped stone objects. When anatomically modern humans evolved a parallel capacity to externalize thoughts as symbolic language, individual brains within social groups became integrated into a "neocortical Internet," or super-brain, giving birth to the mind. Noting that archaeological traces of symbolism coincide with evidence of the ability to generate novel technology, Hoffecker contends that human creativity, as well as higher order consciousness, is a product of the superbrain. He equates the subsequent growth of the mind with human history, which began in Africa more than 50,000 years ago. As anatomically modern humans spread across the globe, adapting to a variety of climates and habitats, they redesigned themselves technologically and created alternative realities through tools, language, and art. Hoffecker connects the rise of civilization to a hierarchical reorganization of the super-brain, triggered by explosive population growth. Subsequent human history reflects to varying degrees the suppression of the mind's creative powers by the rigid hierarchies of nationstates and empires, constraining the further accumulation of knowledge. The modern world emerged after 1200 from the fragments of the Roman Empire, whose collapse had eliminated a central authority that could thwart innovation. Hoffecker concludes with speculation about the possibility of artificial intelligence and the consequences of a mind liberated from its organic antecedents to exist in an independent, nonbiological form.
Categories: Social Science

Learning from the Land

Learning from the Land

The foraging spectrum: diversity in hunter-gatherer lifeways. Smithsonian
Institution Press, Washington. Kvamme, K.L. 1990. San Juan County, Utah,
archaeological vandalism: an assessment of a vandalism model and practices.
Arizona State ...

Author: Linda M. Hill

Publisher:

ISBN: MINN:31951P00471046G

Category: Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument (Utah)

Page: 518

View: 136

Categories: Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument (Utah)

Jade und Kupfer

Jade und Kupfer

Text in German. The purpose of the present work is to combine the advantages of the various research traditions and at the same time to avoid the respective disadvantages.

Author: Lutz Klassen

Publisher: Aarhus Universitetsforlag

ISBN: 8788415260

Category: Social Science

Page: 435

View: 756

Text in German. The purpose of the present work is to combine the advantages of the various research traditions and at the same time to avoid the respective disadvantages. An attempt will be made to interpret the existing archaeological facts with reference to cultural development in large parts of Europe. As a first step an investigation will be made of all indications of contacts between the Ertebølle culture and the early Funnel Beaker culture (5500-3500 BC) on the one hand, and Neolithic cultures in various parts of Europe on the other hand. This will incorporate an analysis of all imported artefacts and also locally produced artefacts and structures with a form that suggests external influence. The results will subsequently be used for an investigation of a range of local factors -- such as regionality, social structures and communication structures - which are thought to be of significance for understanding the Mesolithic-Neolithic transition. An analysis will also be carried out of the central European background of the Funnel Beaker culture. The results of these investigations will in conclusion be combined into a new theory concerning the introduction of agriculture in the Nordic region.
Categories: Social Science