The Law of Peoples

The Law of Peoples

This book consists of two parts: the essay "The Idea of Public Reason Revisited," first published in 1997, and "The Law of Peoples," a major reworking of a much shorter article by the same name published in 1993.

Author: John Rawls

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674005422

Category: Law

Page: 199

View: 794

This book consists of two parts: the essay "The Idea of Public Reason Revisited," first published in 1997, and "The Law of Peoples," a major reworking of a much shorter article by the same name published in 1993. Taken together, they are the culmination of more than fifty years of reflection on liberalism and on some of the most pressing problems of our times by John Rawls. "The Idea of Public Reason Revisited" explains why the constraints of public reason, a concept first discussed in Political Liberalism (1993), are ones that holders of both religious and non-religious comprehensive views can reasonably endorse. It is Rawls's most detailed account of how a modern constitutional democracy, based on a liberal political conception, could and would be viewed as legitimate by reasonable citizens who on religious, philosophical, or moral grounds do not themselves accept a liberal comprehensive doctrine--such as that of Kant, or Mill, or Rawls's own "Justice as Fairness," presented in A Theory of Justice (1971). The Law of Peoples extends the idea of a social contract to the Society of Peoples and lays out the general principles that can and should be accepted by both liberal and non-liberal societies as the standard for regulating their behavior toward one another. In particular, it draws a crucial distinction between basic human rights and the rights of each citizen of a liberal constitutional democracy. It explores the terms under which such a society may appropriately wage war against an "outlaw society," and discusses the moral grounds for rendering assistance to non-liberal societies burdened by unfavorable political and economic conditions.
Categories: Law

The Law of Peoples with

The Law of Peoples  with

This book consists of two parts: “The Law of Peoples,” a major reworking of a much shorter article by the same name published in 1993, and the essay “The Idea of Public Reason Revisited,” first published in 1997.

Author: John Rawls

Publisher:

ISBN: 0674005422

Category: Liberalism

Page: 199

View: 296

This work consists of two parts: The Idea of Public Reason Revisited and The Law of Peoples. Taken together, they are the culmination of more than 50 years of reflection on liberalism and on some pressing problems of our times. Originally published: 1999.
Categories: Liberalism

Rawls s Law of Peoples

Rawls s Law of Peoples

This excellent volume substantially advances that process, and will benefit anyone hoping to understand how one of the greatest political philosophers addressed some of humanity's most pressing problems.

Author: Rex Martin

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 9781405157360

Category: Philosophy

Page: 344

View: 204

This volume examines Rawls's theory of international justice as worked out in his controversial last book, The Law of Peoples.
Categories: Philosophy

John Rawls Political liberalism and the law of peoples

John Rawls  Political liberalism and the law of peoples

Conclusion Rawls frames the difference between the Law of Peoples and cosmopolitan justice with great clarity in a very simple case . Imagine two societies , each satisfying principles of liberal justice , in a world that complies fully ...

Author: Chandran Kukathas

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 0415229995

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 1824

View: 826

John Rawls (1921-2002) is, arguably, the most important political philosopher of our time. It is commonly observed that the publication in 1971 of his treatise A Theory of Justice initiated a return to political questions among Anglo-American philosophers and is largely responsible for the vigorous health of contemporary political philosophy. Rawls' ideas and approach have transformed philosophical inquiry in this area, and political theorists nowadays are obliged to make clear where they stand in relation to Rawls if they wish to be involved in mainstream discussions. Yet Rawls' influence has also extended beyond philosophy and has had a substantial impact on work in law, economics, and political science. Since the publication of A Theory of Justice, Rawls has written two other major works: Political Liberalism (1993) and The Law of Peoples (1999) and also issued a collection of his essays: Collected Papers (1999). This collection provides a thorough analysis of Rawls' work. In addition to a general introduction, the set includes introductions to each volume which help guide the reader through the material.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Book Review

Book Review

Author: Frank J. Garcia

Publisher:

ISBN: OCLC:688604920

Category: Fairness

Page: 19

View: 113

Categories: Fairness

Peace Justice and International Order

Peace  Justice and International Order

Peace, Justice and International Order discusses this question in the light of John Rawls' The Law of Peoples, offers a new approach to Rawls' international theory and contributes to the discourse on international peace and justice.

Author: A. Förster

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9781137452665

Category: Political Science

Page: 185

View: 432

How can fair cooperation and a stable peace be reached in the international realm? Peace, Justice and International Order discusses this question in the light of John Rawls' The Law of Peoples, offers a new approach to Rawls' international theory and contributes to the discourse on international peace and justice.
Categories: Political Science

Moral Psychology Stability and the Law of Peoples

Moral Psychology  Stability and the Law of Peoples

In this paper I take seriously Rawls's characterization of his The Law of Peoples as carrying forward the project of Political Liberalism.

Author: David A. Reidy

Publisher:

ISBN: OCLC:1305454268

Category:

Page: 37

View: 331

In this paper I take seriously Rawls's characterization of his The Law of Peoples as carrying forward the project of Political Liberalism. The latter articulates Rawls's reworking of the stability argument from Part III of A Theory of Justice to better square it with the permanent fact of reasonable doctrinal pluralism under conditions of freedom and right. As presented in Theory the stability argument is an argument from moral psychology. This moral psychology structures the problem generated by doctrinal pluralism in both Political Liberalism and The Law of Peoples, each of which sets out a consistent principled liberal response to it, the former in the domestic, and the latter in the international, context. Bringing this moral psychology to the surface sheds considerable light on Rawls's attempt to vindicate the possibility of world hospitable to enduring just and stable constitutional liberal democracies governed by legitimate law.
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Connecticut journal of international law

Connecticut journal of international law

The republican premise that justice requires all laws to serve the common good rests on a conviction that human perceptions ... Most influentially see John Rawls, The Law of Peoples, in On Human Rights: The Oxford Amnesty Lectures 1993, ...

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN: UCAL:B5114153

Category:

Page:

View: 259

Categories:

Decent Peace Stability and Justice

Decent Peace  Stability and Justice

As a guideline for the foreign policy of liberal (and decent) societies The Law of Peoples can contribute to more stability and justice in the international realm and promote a decent peace.

Author: Annette Förster

Publisher:

ISBN: OCLC:847540977

Category:

Page:

View: 753

John Rawls's international theory, The Law of Peoples, has been read and criticized as "A Theory of International Justice". His major objective, however, is not the establishment of a just (liberal) world order, but to guide liberal societies towards a reasonable peaceful, stable and just international system. From this starting point, the thesis assesses whether Rawls's international theory can meet its task to function as a guideline for the promotion of international peace, stability and justice and how that peace might be conceived. The author argues that Rawls sketches the path to a "decent peace". The scrutiny of the issue takes the form of an in-depth analysis and discussion of The Law of Peoples and a systematic investigation of a number of cases. The dissertation examines the possible contribution of Rawls's ideas, primarily the Society of Peoples and the principles of the Law of Peoples, to international peace, stability and justice. As the focus lies on decent regimes and a decent peace, three actual decent societies are identified (Oman, Qatar and Singapore), in order to highlight the applicability of the notion to the international system, as well as to ensure that decent regimes are not mere constructions serving to justify imposing liberal principles of non-liberal regimes. The dissertation finally investigates the enlargement of the democratic peace thesis towards a decent peace; it discusses the arguments for a democratic peace and applies them to Rawls's conception of decent peoples as well as to the identified regimes. It concludes asserting that the decent peace thesis is theoretically wellfounded, whereas the empirical evidence is - due to only three identified regimes - rather weak. As a guideline for the foreign policy of liberal (and decent) societies The Law of Peoples can contribute to more stability and justice in the international realm and promote a decent peace.
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