The Last American Man

Author: Elizabeth Gilbert

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN: 1408806878

Category:

Page: 288

View: 7074

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At the age of seventeen, Eustace Conway ditched the comforts of his suburban existence to escape to the wild. Away from the crushing disapproval of his father, he lived alone in a teepee in the mountains. Everything he needed he built, grew or killed. He made his clothes from deer he killed and skinned before using their sinew as sewing thread. But he didn't stop there. In the years that followed, he stopped at nothing in pursuit of bigger, bolder challenges. He travelled the Mississippi in a handmade wooden canoe; he walked the two-thousand-mile Appalachian Trail; he hiked across the German Alps in trainers; he scaled cliffs in New Zealand. One Christmas, he finished dinner with his family and promptly upped and left - to ride his horse across America. From South Carolina to the Pacific, with his little brother in tow, they dodged cars on the highways, ate road kill and slept on the hard ground. Now, more than twenty years on, Eustace is still in the mountains, residing in a thousand-acre forest where he teaches survival skills and attempts to instil in people a deeper appreciation of nature. But over time he has had to reconcile his ambitious dreams with the sobering realities of modernity. Told with Elizabeth Gilbert's trademark wit and spirit, this is a fascinating, intimate portrait of an endlessly complicated man: a visionary, a narcissist, a brilliant but flawed modern hero. The Last American Man is an unforgettable adventure story of an irrepressible life lived to the extreme. The Last American Man is a New York Times Notable Book and National Book Critics Circle Award Finalist.
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The American Literary History Reader

Author: Gordon Hutner

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: 0195095049

Category: Law

Page: 388

View: 7860

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In its first five years, American Literary History has produced an exciting body of work representing the full range of American literary critical practices at a time when no consensus in the field exists. This collection brings together the cream of this cutting-edge work, presenting seventeen of the most significant voices in the argument over literature's importance. Among the contributors and issues included in the anthology are Hertha D. Wong on Indian pictographs and the language of selfhood they inscribe, David Lionel Smith on the Black Arts Movement, Henry Louis Gates, Jr. on the new pluralism, David Leverenz on the "representative man" and gender politics, Betsy Erkkila on Dickinson and class, and Ram�n Saldivar on the literature of the border. A state of the art look at American literary criticism, this handy compendium will interest all scholars and students in the field, regardless of their familiarity with the journal.
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The Last American Puritan

The Life of Increase Mather, 1639-1723

Author: Michael G. Hall

Publisher: Wesleyan University Press

ISBN: 9780819562388

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 456

View: 5439

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A critically acclaimed and accessible biography of one of the towering figures of New England's colonial period; winner of The Conference on Christianity and Literature's Book Award.
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The Last American Generation (1876-1976)

Author: J. H. Thomasson

Publisher: Dorrance Publishing

ISBN: 143491772X

Category: History

Page: 262

View: 2186

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The Last American Generation (1876-1976) by J. H. Thomasson About the Book The future is bleak for America in this scenario, where the new generation of men and women are bereft of any Christian moral ethics, and are too spineless to stand up to the threat of terrorism in its weirdest, freakiest form, coming from a group of people any American would least expect to harbor ill-feeling against. So believes James Farmer, and if anyone is tempted to rebel against the form¿and style¿of the narrative, he or she might find consolation in the nature of the enemies of America as they are here portrayed and described, human creations so grotesque they hardly fit in any decent society, as James confirms. Confronted with logic-defying, surreal situations, the mind is sometimes admonished to apply suspension of disbelief, and the patient reader would indeed require a lot of it to overcome the challenge of this narrative. About the Author J. H. Thomasson is a forty-two-year native of Newark, New Jersey. He attended both Bloomfield College and Drake College, where he graduated and received a Tech diploma within two years with honors. Married to Geni, he counts book writing, history, and professional hockey as special fields of interest. (2013, paperback, 262 pages)
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On Lingering and Being Last

Race and Sovereignty in the New World

Author: Jonathan Elmer

Publisher: Fordham Univ Press

ISBN: 0823229416

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 260

View: 3277

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What are we talking about when we talk about sovereignty? Is it about formal legitimacy or practical authority? Does it require the ability to control the flow of people or goods across a border; is it primarily a principle of international recognition; or does its essence lie in the power to regulate the lives of a state's citizens? Political theorists, historians, scholars of international relations, lawyers, anthropologists, literary critics--all approach the dilemmas of sovereign power with a mixture of urgency and frustration. In On Lingering and Being Last, Jonathan Elmer argues that the logic of sovereignty that emerged in early modern Europe and that limits our thinking today must be understood as a fundamentally racialized logic, first visible in the New World. The modern concept of sovereignty is based on a trope of personification, the conjunction of individual and collective identities. In Grotius, Hobbes, and others, a fiction of sovereign autonomy enabled states to be personified as individuals, as bodies politic, even as individual humans could be imagined as miniature states. The contradictions of this logic were fully revealed only in the New World, as writers ranging from Aphra Behn to Thomas Jefferson and Herman Melville demonstrate. The racialized sovereign figures examined in On Lingering and Being Last--the slave king Oroonoko, the last chief Logan, and their avatars--are always at once a person and a people. They embody the connection between the individual and the collectivity, and thereby reveal that the volatile work of sovereign personification takes place in a new world constituted both by concepts of equality, homogeneity, and symmetry--by an ideal of liberal individualism--and by the realities of racial domination and ideology in the era of colonial expansion. The conjunction of the individual, race, and New World territorialization, Elmer argues, is key to understanding the deepest strata in the political imagination of Atlantic modernity.
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The Final Frontiersman

Heimo Korth and His Family, Alone in Alaska's Arctic Wilderness

Author: James Campbell

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 9780743453134

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 303

View: 8213

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Campbell chronicles his cousin's amazing life and adventures in the wilds of Alaska, creating a powerful, real-life epic of triumph and tragedy.
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Eco-man

New Perspectives on Masculinity and Nature

Author: Mark Allister,Mark Christopher Allister

Publisher: University of Virginia Press

ISBN: 9780813923055

Category: Social Science

Page: 277

View: 2511

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The paradoxical role nature plays in American myth and history grows in part from the male’s reverent fascination with the wilderness and his equally strong impulse to dominate it. Many canonical literary works—think of Thoreau, Melville, Hemingway, Faulkner—look to the wild as the site for establishing a man’s selfhood. But nature is just as often subjected to his most violent displays of mastery. This tension lies at the heart of Eco-Man, which brings together two rapidly growing fields: men’s studies and ecocriticism. The two disciplines have rarely if ever touched on each other; brought together, men’s studies is freed from its typical limitation of an exclusively urban-centered perspective, while ecocriticism engages an "ecomasculine" lens through which to view the field. The book’s contents are diverse, but the contributors all challenge our idea of masculinity as merely the social code of patriarchy. By complicating our cultural notions of nature and masculinity, the volume’s twenty essays question whether we can construct a notion of manhood around ecological principles and practices—and if so, what this would look like, and how it would enrich men’s studies. The varied assembly of contributors to Eco-Man—including historians, philosophers, poets, both male and female—have all written with the general reader in mind. The result is a book as approachable as it is groundbreaking. Contributors:John Tallmadge * Gretchen Legler * Mark Allister * Scott Russell Sanders * Thomas R. Smith * Scott Slovic * Alvin Handelman * David Copland Morris * Rick Fairbanks * Cheryll Glotfelty * Barton Sutter * James Barilla * Timothy Young * O. Alan Weltzien * Julia Martin * Patrick D. Murphy * Jim Heynen * Lilace Mellin Guignard * Stephen J. Mexal * Ken Lamberton * James J. Farrell
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The Last American Cowboy

Author: Mike R. Dunbar

Publisher: AuthorHouse

ISBN: 1449002390

Category: Fiction

Page: 268

View: 667

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This book details the story of a young man, a fictional character, Clem Barnett, during the late 1940's and 1950's, raised as a boy in the mid-west with dreams and visions, based on romantic books and movies, of being a cowboy in the West. He finds himself venturing far from his home in northeastern Oklahoma to hire-out on two very different ranches; first, one in Montana and later, one in Idaho. There, he learns about ranching, the cattle business, and most importantly, about life. He also learns what the modern, for the time period, cowboy is and how it differs greatly from his romantic vision. He faces many adventures and interacts with a host of colorful characters in search of his dreams. Because the story occurs in the early 1950's, the young man is faced with the horrors of participating in the Korean War, and more importantly, facing the emotional effects thereafter. Unlikely characters assist in his recovery and he gains respect and love for the people of the Basque culture who helped him. The story ends with a simple love story and a realization that dreams can be elusive. In the end, he finds peace and happiness and seems to come close to living the life of the romantic cowboy he envisioned. Others see in him a person who so loves the life of a cowboy and confers upon him the title of the last romantic, real life, American Cowboy.
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The Last Man on the Mountain: The Death of an American Adventurer on K2

Author: Jennifer Jordan

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 0393079198

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 320

View: 6747

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"A fascinating tale…Readers who are into high-altitude adventure stories won’t be disappointed." —Associated Press In 1939 the Savage Mountain claimed its first victim. Born into vast wealth yet uneasy with a life of leisure, Dudley Wolfe, of Boston and Rockport, Maine, set out to become the first man to climb K2, the world’s second-highest mountain and, in the opinion of mountaineers, an even more formidable challenge than Mt. Everest. Although close to middle age and inexperienced at high altitude, Wolfe, with the team leader, made it higher than any other members of the expedition, but he couldn’t get back down. Suffering from altitude sickness and severe dehydration, he was abandoned at nearly 25,000 feet; it would be another sixty-three years before the author discovered his remains.
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The Last American Diplomat

John D Negroponte and the Changing Face of US Diplomacy

Author: George W. Liebmann

Publisher: I.B.Tauris

ISBN: 0857730401

Category: Political Science

Page: 384

View: 815

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Can John D. Negroponte be described as ‘The Last American Diplomat’? In a career spanning 50 years of unprecedented American global power, he was the last of a dying breed of patrician diplomats - devoted to public service, a self-effacing and ultimate insider, whose prime duty was to advise, guide and warn - a bulwark of traditional diplomatic realism against ideologue excess. Negroponte served as US ambassador to Honduras, Mexico, the Philippines and Iraq; he was US Permanent Representative to the UN, Director of National Intelligence and Deputy Secretary of State to George W. Bush. His was a high-flying and seemingly conventional career but one full of surprises. Negroponte opposed Kissinger in Vietnam, supported a ‘proxy war’ but opposed direct American military action against Marxists in Central America - facing bitter Congress opposition in the process. He swam against the floodtide of George W. Bush’s neocon-dominated administration, warning against the Iraq war as a possible new ‘Vietnam’ and criticising aspects of Bush’s ‘War on Terror’. He disconcerted the administration by arguing that the re-establishment of Iraq would take as long as five years. And he was influential in international social and economic policy - working for the successful re-settlement of millions of refugees in Southeast Asia following the Vietnam War, issuing early warnings about the scourge of AIDS in Africa and successfully launching the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). George W. Liebmann’s incisive account is based on personal and shared experience but it is no hagiography; beyond the author’s discussions with Negroponte, this book is deeply researched in US state papers and includes interviews with leading actors. It will provide fascinating reading for anyone interested in the inside-story of American diplomacy, showing personal and policy struggles, and the underlying fissures present even in the world’s last remaining superpower.
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