The Killing Zone, Second Edition : How & Why Pilots Die, Second Edition

How & Why Pilots Die, Second Edition

Author: Paul Craig

Publisher: McGraw Hill Professional

ISBN: 0071798404

Category: Transportation

Page: 304

View: 5541

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WARNING! Don't fly solo before you understand all the dangers of the killing zone. It could save your life! This survival guide for new pilots identifies the pitfalls waiting inside the killing zone, the period from 50 to 350 flight hours when they leave their instructors behind and fly as pilot in command for the first time. Although they're privately certified, many of these unseasoned aviators are unaware of the potential accidents that lie ahead while trying to build decision-making skills on their own -- many times falling victim to inexperience. Based on the first in-depth scientific study of pilot behavior and general aviation flying accidents in over 20 years, The Killing Zone, Second Edition offers practical advice to help identify the time frame in which you are most likely to die. Author and aviation specialist Paul Craig offers rare insights into the special risks new pilots face and includes updated preventive strategies for flying through the killing zone . . . alive: NEW to the Second Edition: Dealing with Glass Cockpits; GPS Moving Maps; Collision Avoidance Systems; including a new chapter on Available Safety versus Actual Safety Alerts you to the 12 mistakes likely to kill you Provides guidelines for avoiding, evading, diverting, correcting, and managing dangers Includes a "Pilot Personality Self-Assessment Exercise" for an individualized survival strategy
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The Killing Zone: How & Why Pilots Die

Author: Paul Craig

Publisher: McGraw Hill Professional

ISBN: 007150415X

Category: Transportation

Page: 304

View: 3359

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This literal survival guide for new pilots identifies "the killing zone," the 40-250 flight hours during which unseasoned aviators are likely to commit lethal mistakes. Presents the statistics of how many pilots will die in the zone within a year; calls attention to the eight top pilot killers (such as "VFR into IFR," "Takeoff and Climb"); and maps strategies for avoiding, diverting, correcting, and managing the dangers. Includes a Pilot Personality Self-Assessment Exercise that identifies pilot "types" and how each type can best react to survive the killing zone.
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The Killing Zone, Second Edition

How & Why Pilots Die

Author: Paul Craig

Publisher: McGraw Hill Professional

ISBN: 0071798412

Category: Transportation

Page: 304

View: 988

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WARNING! Don't fly solo before you understand all the dangers of the killing zone. It could save your life! This survival guide for new pilots identifies the pitfalls waiting inside the killing zone, the period from 50 to 350 flight hours when they leave their instructors behind and fly as pilot in command for the first time. Although they're privately certified, many of these unseasoned aviators are unaware of the potential accidents that lie ahead while trying to build decision-making skills on their own -- many times falling victim to inexperience. Based on the first in-depth scientific study of pilot behavior and general aviation flying accidents in over 20 years, The Killing Zone, Second Edition offers practical advice to help identify the time frame in which you are most likely to die. Author and aviation specialist Paul Craig offers rare insights into the special risks new pilots face and includes updated preventive strategies for flying through the killing zone . . . alive: NEW to the Second Edition: Dealing with Glass Cockpits; GPS Moving Maps; Collision Avoidance Systems; including a new chapter on Available Safety versus Actual Safety Alerts you to the 12 mistakes likely to kill you Provides guidelines for avoiding, evading, diverting, correcting, and managing dangers Includes a "Pilot Personality Self-Assessment Exercise" for an individualized survival strategy
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Amicicide: The Problem Of Friendly Fire In Modern War [Illustrated Edition]

Author: Lt.-Col C. R. Shrader

Publisher: Pickle Partners Publishing

ISBN: 1786253704

Category: History

Page: 146

View: 2410

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Includes 10 detailed tables ‘War is often depicted in the textbooks as a well-orchestrated, albeit violent, exercise in which opposing units strive to achieve tactical and strategic objectives. That each side will suffer casualties in the process is taken for granted; they are the inevitable, if regretable, consequence of such a deadly undertaking. That each side is almost certain to suffer casualties inflicted by its own forces is not generally taken for granted. Yet, in each of America’s wars, especially those of the twentieth century, a significant number of soldiers have been killed or wounded as the result of friendly fire. The fact that the percentage of casualties resulting from friendly fire from World War I through Vietnam has been extremely low does not make the accidental killing or wounding of one’s own troops any less tragic or unpalatable. Nor does it offer much consolation to the commander responsible for the lives of his troops or to the soldier who runs the risk of falling victim to the fire of his own forces. To be sure, each branch of the Army and each of the Armed Services employ measures calculated to prevent incidents of friendly fire...Before one can undertake a serious and comprehensive analysis of friendly fire, these data must be found and brought together in one place. In Amicicide: The Problem of Friendly Fire in Modern War, LTC Charles R. Shrader has taken a major step toward the compilation of these data. In his well-informed narrative, he draws tentative conclusions about the causes and effects of friendly fire and offers recommendations for those who expect to study the subject further. He has, in short, produced a superb reference book and a springboard for a deeper and more comprehensive analysis of this grim and complex problem.’-Foreword
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