The Invention of Clouds

How an Amateur Meteorologist Forged the Language of the Skies

Author: Richard Hamblyn

Publisher: Pan Macmillan

ISBN: 033053730X

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 304

View: 1261

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An extraordinary yet little-known scientific advance occurred in the opening years of the nineteenth century when a young amateur meteorologist, Luke Howard, gave the clouds the names by which they are known to this day. By creating a language to define structures that had, up to then, been considered random and unknowable, Howard revolutionized the science of meteorology and earned the admiration of his leading contemporaries in art, literature and science. Richard Hamblyn charts Howard’s life from obscurity to international fame, and back to obscurity once more. He recreates the period’s intoxicating atmosphere of scientific discovery, and shows how this provided inspiration for figures such as Goethe, Shelley and Constable. Offering rich insights into the nature of celebrity, the close relationship between the sciences and the arts, and the excitement generated by new ideas, The Invention of Clouds is an enthralling work of social and scientific history.
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The Invention of Clouds

How an Amateur Meteorologist Forged the Language of the Skies

Author: Richard Hamblyn

Publisher: Macmillan

ISBN: 9780312420017

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 292

View: 7715

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Details the true story of a timid young Quaker and amateur meteorologist named Luke Howard who was hurled into the spotlight when he assigned poetic names to the clouds in December 1802, which became a landmark in natural history and meteorology and caused him to become immortalized in the works of the Romantics. Reprint. 10,000 first printing.
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War at a Distance

Romanticism and the Making of Modern Wartime

Author: Mary A. Favret

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9781400831555

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 280

View: 603

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What does it mean to live during wartime away from the battle zone? What is it like for citizens to go about daily routines while their country sends soldiers to kill and be killed across the globe? Timely and thought-provoking, War at a Distance considers how those left on the home front register wars and wartime in their everyday lives, particularly when military conflict remains removed from immediate perception, available only through media forms. Looking back over two centuries, Mary Favret locates the origins of modern wartime in the Napoleonic era and describes how global military operations affected the British populace, as the nation's army and navy waged battles far from home for decades. She reveals that the literature and art produced in Britain during the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries obsessively cultivated means for feeling as much as understanding such wars, and established forms still relevant today. Favret examines wartime literature and art as varied as meditations on the Iliad, the history of meteorology, landscape painting in India, and popular poetry in newspapers and periodicals; she locates the embedded sense of war and dislocation in works ranging from Austen, Coleridge, and Wordsworth to Woolf, Stevens, and Sebald; and she contemplates how literature provides the public with methods for responding to violent calamities happening elsewhere. Bringing to light Romanticism's legacy in reflections on modern warfare, this book shows that war's absent presence affects home in deep and irrevocable ways.
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The Weather Experiment

The Pioneers who Sought to see the Future

Author: Peter Moore

Publisher: Random House

ISBN: 1448155975

Category: Nature

Page: 416

View: 1269

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**Book of the Week on Radio 4** 'Gripping' The Times 'Exhilarating' Sunday Times In an age when a storm was evidence of God’s wrath, pioneering meteorologists had to fight against convention and religious dogma to realise their ambitions. But buoyed by the achievements of the Enlightenment, a generation of mavericks set out to unlock the secrets of the atmosphere. Meet Luke Howard, the first to classify the clouds, Francis Beaufort, quantifier of the winds, James Glaisher, explorer of the upper atmosphere by way of a hot air balloon, Samuel Morse, whose electric telegraph gave scientists the means by which to transmit weather warnings, and at the centre of it all Admiral Robert FitzRoy: master sailor, scientific pioneer and founder of the Met Office. Peter Moore’s exhilarating account navigates treacherous seas, rough winds and uncovers the obsession that drove these men to great invention and greater understanding.
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Key Methods in Geography

Author: Nicholas Clifford,Meghan Cope,Thomas Gillespie,Shaun French

Publisher: SAGE

ISBN: 1473908973

Category: Science

Page: 752

View: 3929

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"Practical, accessible, careful and interesting, this...revised volume brings the subject up-to-date and explains, in bite sized chunks, the "how's" and "why's" of modern day geographical study...[It] brings together physical and human approaches again in a new synthesis." - Danny Dorling, Professor of Geography, University of Oxford Key Methods in Geography is the perfect introductory companion, providing an overview of qualitative and quantitative methods for human and physical geography. New to the third edition: 12 new chapters representing emerging themes including online, virtual and digital geographical methods Real-life case study examples Summaries and exercises for each chapter Free online access to full text of Progress in Human Geography and Progress in Physical Geography Progress Reports The teaching of research methods is integral to all geography courses: Key Methods in Geography, 3rd Edition explains all of the key methods with which geography undergraduates must be conversant.
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Encyclopedia of World Climatology

Author: John E. Oliver

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 1402032641

Category: Science

Page: 854

View: 9441

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Today, given the well-publicized impacts of events such as El Niño, there is an unequaled public awareness of how climate affects the quality of life and environment. Such awareness has created an increasing demand for accurate climatological information. This information is now available in one convenient, accessible source, the Encyclopedia of World Climatology. This comprehensive volume covers all the main subfields of climatology, supplies information on climates in major continental areas, and explains the intricacies of climatic processes. The level of presentation will meet the needs of specialists, university students, and educated laypersons. A successor to the 1986 Encyclopedia of Climatology, this compendium provides a clear explanation of current knowledge and research directions in modern climatology. This new encyclopedia emphasizes climatological developments that have evolved over the past twenty years. It offers more than 200 informative articles prepared by 150 experts on numerous subjects, ranging from standard areas of study to the latest research studies. The relationship between climatology and both physical and social science is fully explored, as is the significance of climate for our future well-being. The information is organized for speedy access. Entries are conveniently arranged in alphabetical order, thoroughly indexed, and cross-referenced. Every entry contains useful citations to additional source materials. The Editor John E. Oliver is Professor Emeritus at Indiana State University. He holds a B.Sc. from London University, and a MA and Ph.D from Columbia University. He taught at Columbia University and then at Indiana State where he was formerly Chair of the Geography-Geology Department, and Assoc iate Dean, College of Arts and Sciences. He has written many books and journal articles in Climatology, Applied Climatology and Physical Geography.
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History

An Introduction to Theory, Method and Practice

Author: Peter Claus,John Marriott

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317866088

Category: History

Page: 488

View: 9689

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Why should history students care about theory? What relevance does it have to the "proper" role of the historian? Historiography and historical theory are often perceived as complex subjects, which many history students find frustrating and difficult. Philosophical approaches, postmodernism, anthropology, feminism or Marxism can seem arcane and abstract and students often struggle to apply these ideas in practice. Starting from the premise that historical theory and historiography are fascinating and exciting topics to study, Claus and Marriott guide the student through the various historical theories and approaches in a balanced, comprehensive and engaging way. Packed with intriguing anecdotes from all periods of history and supported by primary extracts from original historical writings, History: An Introduction to Theory, Method and Practice is the student-friendly text which demystifies the subject with clarity and verve. Key features - Written in a clear and witty way. Presents a balanced view of the subject, rather than the polemical view of one historian. Comprehensive - covers the whole range of topics taught on historiography and historical theory courses in suitable depth. Full of examples from different historical approaches - from social, cultural and political history to gender, economic and world history Covers a wide chronological breadth of examples from the ancient and medieval worlds to the twentieth century. Shows how students can engage with the theories covered in each chapter and apply them to their own studies via the "In Practice" feature at the end of each chapter. Includes "Discussion Documents" - numerous extracts from the primary historiographical texts for students to read and reflect upon.
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A Short History of Nearly Everything: Special Illustrated Edition

Author: Bill Bryson

Publisher: Broadway Books

ISBN: 030788516X

Category: History

Page: 624

View: 5659

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One of the world’s most beloved writers and bestselling author of One Summer takes his ultimate journey—into the most intriguing and intractable questions that science seeks to answer. In A Walk in the Woods, Bill Bryson trekked the Appalachian Trail—well, most of it. In A Sunburned Country, he confronted some of the most lethal wildlife Australia has to offer. Now, in his biggest book, he confronts his greatest challenge: to understand—and, if possible, answer—the oldest, biggest questions we have posed about the universe and ourselves. Taking as territory everything from the Big Bang to the rise of civilization, Bryson seeks to understand how we got from there being nothing at all to there being us. To that end, he has attached himself to a host of the world’s most advanced (and often obsessed) archaeologists, anthropologists, and mathematicians, travelling to their offices, laboratories, and field camps. He has read (or tried to read) their books, pestered them with questions, apprenticed himself to their powerful minds. A Short History of Nearly Everything is the record of this quest, and it is a sometimes profound, sometimes funny, and always supremely clear and entertaining adventure in the realms of human knowledge, as only Bill Bryson can render it. Science has never been more involving or entertaining.
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The Cosmic Viewpoint

A Study of Seneca's 'Natural Questions'

Author: Gareth D. Williams

Publisher: OUP USA

ISBN: 0199731586

Category: History

Page: 392

View: 1625

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The Cosmic Viewpoint examines the literary and philosophical qualities essential to Seneca's art of science in his Natural Questions. Seneca's meteorological theme raises our gaze from a terrestrial level to a higher, more intuitive plane - a conceptual climb by which Seneca promotes a change of perspective in his readership towards the cosmic viewpoint.
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The Storm

Author: Daniel Defoe

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN: 0141937971

Category: History

Page: 272

View: 5322

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On the evening of 26th November 1703, a cyclone from the north Atlantic hammered into southern Britain at over seventy miles an hour, claiming the lives of over 8,000 people. Eyewitnesses reported seeing cows left stranded in the branches of trees and windmills ablaze from the friction of their whirling sails. For Defoe, bankrupt and just released from prison for seditious writings, the storm struck during one of his bleakest moments. But it also furnished him with the material for his first book, and in his powerful depiction of private suffering and individual survival played out against a backdrop of public calamity we can trace the outlines of his later masterpieces such as A Journal of the Plague Year and Robinson Crusoe.
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