The Hauerwas Reader

The Hauerwas Reader

Highlighting both his constructive goals and penchant for polemic, the collection reflects the enormous variety of subjects he has engaged, the different genres in which he has written, and the diverse audiences he has addressed.

Author: Stanley Hauerwas

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 9780822380368

Category: Religion

Page: 748

View: 130

Stanley Hauerwas is one of the most widely read and oft-cited theologians writing today. A prolific lecturer and author, he has been at the forefront of key developments in contemporary theology, ranging from narrative theology to the “recovery of virtue.” Yet despite his prominence and the esteem reserved for his thought, his work has never before been collected in a single volume that provides a sense of the totality of his vision. The editors of The Hauerwas Reader, therefore, have compiled and edited a volume that represents all the different periods and phases of Hauerwas’s work. Highlighting both his constructive goals and penchant for polemic, the collection reflects the enormous variety of subjects he has engaged, the different genres in which he has written, and the diverse audiences he has addressed. It offers Hauerwas on ethics, virtue, medicine, and suffering; on euthanasia, abortion, and sexuality; and on war in relation to Catholic and Protestant thought. His essays on the role of religion in liberal democracies, the place of the family in capitalist societies, the inseparability of Christianity and Judaism, and on many other topics are included as well. Perhaps more than any other author writing on religious topics today, Hauerwas speaks across lines of religious traditions, appealing to Methodists, Jews, Anabaptists or Mennonites, Catholics, Episcopalians, and others.
Categories: Religion

Christian Ethics and Commonsense Morality

Christian Ethics and Commonsense Morality

Stanley Hauerwas, The Hauerwas Reader (Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2001), 159; Hilary Putnam, “Realism and Reason,” Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 50, no. 6 (1977): 483; italics in the ...

Author: Kevin Jung

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317555780

Category: Philosophy

Page: 210

View: 183

Christian Ethics and Commonsense Morality goes against the grain of various postmodern approaches to morality in contemporary religious ethics. In this book, Jung seeks to provide a new framework in which the nature of common Christian moral beliefs and practices can be given a new meaning. He suggests that, once major philosophical assumptions behind postmodern theories of morality are called into question, we may look at Christian morality in quite a different light. On his account, Christian morality is a historical morality insofar as it is rooted in the rich historical traditions of the Christian church. Yet this kind of historical dependence does not entail the evidential dependence of all moral beliefs on historical traditions. It is possible to argue for the epistemic autonomy of moral beliefs, according to which Christian and other moral beliefs can be justified independently of their historical sources. The particularity of Christian morality lies not in its particular historical sources that also function as the grounds of justification, but rather in its explanatory and motivational capacity to further articulate the kind of moral knowledge that is readily available to most human beings and to enable people to act upon their moral knowledge.
Categories: Philosophy

Persuasion and Compulsion in Democracy

Persuasion and Compulsion in Democracy

In The Hauerwas Reader, edited by Michael Cartwright and John Berkman. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2001, 200–221. Campbell, John. “William James and the Ethics of Fulfillment.” Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 17, ...

Author: Jacquelyn Ann K. Kegley

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 9780739178782

Category: Philosophy

Page: 271

View: 760

This book focuses on the roles that coercion and persuasion should play in contemporary democratic political systems or societies. A major concern is with the conversational character of democracy. Given the problematic and ambiguous status of the many differences present in contemporary society, the contributors seek to alert us to the danger that an emphasis on reasonable consensus will conceal.
Categories: Philosophy

Theological Ethics

Theological Ethics

Stanley Hauerwas, The Hauerwas Reader, ed. J. Berkman and Michael G. Cartwright (Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2001), 37. 16. Hauerwas. Hauerwas Reader, 40. 17. Michaud and Reeves, “Stanley Hauerwas (1940–).” 18. Cited in Hauerwas ...

Author: W. Ross Hastings

Publisher: Zondervan Academic

ISBN: 9780310111962

Category: Religion

Page: 256

View: 359

Be Prepared to Think Theologically through Today's Most Pressing Ethical and Moral Issues In Theological Ethics theologian, pastor, and ethicist W. Ross Hastings gives pastors, ministry leaders, and students a guide designed to equip them to think deeply and theologically about the moral formation of persons in our communities, about ethical inquiry and action, and about the tone and content of our engagement in the public square. The book presents a biblical perspective and a gospel-centered framework for thinking about complex contemporary issues in ways are life-giving and that will lead readers into greater flourishing as human persons in community. This book is distinctive in presenting: A framework for theological ethics that is robustly theological and Trinitarian. Ethics isolated from the gospel and theology becomes bad news, but when it is informed by and empowered by participation in the triune God of grace, it is part of the good news of the gospel. An approach to theology and theological ethics that makes the Word of God the ultimate authority and it is therefore grounded in the biblical narrative and texts. An understanding that theological ethics are inherently missional. The church as the image of the triune God makes it the home of ethics, but in light of its missional identity, it will reverberate outwards to engage the world in ways that are humble and not power-mongering, that are gospel-based and shalom-evoking. Theological Ethics is for those who lead churches or ministries (or someday will) and who urgently need deep theological grounding as they daily encounter ethical and moral issues where they need to provide a gracious, truthful, and gospel-directed response. X
Categories: Religion

The Dangers of Christian Practice

The Dangers of Christian Practice

In Hauerwas and Berkman, The Hauerwas Reader, 255–66. ———. “On Being a Church Capable of Addressing a World at War: A Pacifist Response to the United Methodist Bishops' Pastoral In Defense of Creation.” In Hauerwas and Berkman, ...

Author: Lauren F. Winner

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 9780300215823

Category: Baptism

Page: 230

View: 338

Challenging the central place that "practices" have recently held in Christian theology, Lauren Winner explores the damages these practices have inflicted over the centuries Sometimes, beloved and treasured Christian practices go horrifyingly wrong, extending violence rather than promoting its healing. In this bracing book, Lauren Winner provocatively challenges the assumption that the church possesses a set of immaculate practices that will definitionally train Christians in virtue and that can't be answerable to their histories. Is there, for instance, an account of prayer that has anything useful to say about a slave-owning woman's praying for her slaves' obedience? Is there a robustly theological account of the Eucharist that connects the Eucharist's goods to the sacrament's central role in medieval Christian murder of Jews? Arguing that practices are deformed in ways that are characteristic of and intrinsic to the practices themselves, Winner proposes that the register in which Christians might best think about the Eucharist, prayer, and baptism is that of "damaged gift." Christians go on with these practices because, though blighted by sin, they remain gifts from God.
Categories: Baptism

Imitating Christ in Magwi

Imitating Christ in Magwi

And even if, as may be expected, there is a continuing decline of the felt pertinence of this way of reading among ... On the claim that the church is an empirical reality, Hauerwas, The Hauerwas Reader, 382; for the claim that the ...

Author: Todd D. Whitmore

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9780567684202

Category: Religion

Page: 400

View: 480

Imitating Christ in Magwi: An Anthropological Theology achieves two things. First, focusing on indigenous Roman Catholics in northern Uganda and South Sudan, it is a detailed ethnography of how a community sustains hope in the midst of one of the most brutal wars in recent memory, that between the Ugandan government and the rebel Lord's Resistance Army. Whitmore finds that the belief that the spirit of Jesus Christ can enter into a person through such devotions as the Adoration of the Eucharist gave people the wherewithal to carry out striking works of mercy during the conflict, and, like Jesus of Nazareth, to risk their lives in the process. Traditional devotion leveraged radical witness. Second, Gospel Mimesis is a call for theology itself to be a practice of imitating Christ. Such practice requires both living among people on the far margins of society – Whitmore carried out his fieldwork in Internally Displaced Persons camps – and articulating a theology that foregrounds the daily, if extraordinary, lives of people. Here, ethnography is not an add-on to theological concepts; rather, ethnography is a way of doing theology, and includes what anthropologists call “thick description” of lives of faith. Unlike theology that draws only upon abstract concepts, what Whitmore calls “anthropological theology” is consonant with the fact that God did indeed become human. It may well involve risk to one's own life – Whitmore had to leave Uganda for three years after writing an article critical of the President – but that is what imitatio Christi sometimes requires.
Categories: Religion

The Mystical as Political

The Mystical as Political

Stanley Hauerwas, “Remembering as a Moral Task: The Challenge of the Holocaust,” in The Hauerwas Reader, ed. John Berkman and Michael Cartwright, 327–47 (Durham: Duke University Press, 2001), 341. 3. Stanley Hauerwas, “Why the ...

Author: Aristotle Papanikolaou

Publisher: University of Notre Dame Pess

ISBN: 9780268089832

Category: Religion

Page: 248

View: 254

Theosis, or the principle of divine-human communion, sparks the theological imagination of Orthodox Christians and has been historically important to questions of political theology. In The Mystical as Political: Democracy and Non-Radical Orthodoxy, Aristotle Papanikolaou argues that a political theology grounded in the principle of divine-human communion must be one that unequivocally endorses a political community that is democratic in a way that structures itself around the modern liberal principles of freedom of religion, the protection of human rights, and church-state separation. Papanikolaou hopes to forge a non-radical Orthodox political theology that extends beyond a reflexive opposition to the West and a nostalgic return to a Byzantine-like unified political-religious culture. His exploration is prompted by two trends: the fall of communism in traditionally Orthodox countries has revealed an unpreparedness on the part of Orthodox Christianity to address the question of political theology in a way that is consistent with its core axiom of theosis; and recent Christian political theology, some of it evoking the notion of “deification,” has been critical of liberal democracy, implying a mutual incompatibility between a Christian worldview and that of modern liberal democracy. The first comprehensive treatment from an Orthodox theological perspective of the issue of the compatibility between Orthodoxy and liberal democracy, Papanikolaou’s is an affirmation that Orthodox support for liberal forms of democracy is justified within the framework of Orthodox understandings of God and the human person. His overtly theological approach shows that the basic principles of liberal democracy are not tied exclusively to the language and categories of Enlightenment philosophy and, so, are not inherently secular.
Categories: Religion

Christ Divided

Christ Divided

After Christendom: How the Church Is to Behave if Freedom, Justice, and a Christian Nation Are Bad Ideas. Nashville: Abingdon, 1991. ———. “Christianity: It's Not a Religion, It's an Adventure.” In The Hauerwas Reader.

Author: Katie Walker Grimes

Publisher: Fortress Press

ISBN: 9781506438535

Category: Religion

Page: 344

View: 468

Bringing the wisdom of generations of black Catholics into conversation with contemporary scholarly accounts of racism, Christ Divided diagnoses ""antiblackness supremacy"" as a corporate vice that inhabits the body of Christ. To truly understand racial inequality, theologians must acknowledge the existence of ""antiblackness supremacy"" and recognize its uniquely foundational role in prevailing processes of racialization and racial hierarchy. In addition to introducing a new framework of racial analysis, this book proposes a new approach to virtue ethics. Because the church‘s participation in and performance of white supremacy occurs as a result of corporate habituation, the church most needs new habits, not new teachings. The theory of corporate virtue outlined here provides a framework through which to evaluate these habits and propose new ones-to be made to "do the right thing."
Categories: Religion

Social Selves and Political Reforms

Social Selves and Political Reforms

In The Hauerwas Reader, edited by John Berkman and Michael Cartwright, 371-91. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2001. . “Story-Formed Community: Reflections on Watership Down.” In The Hauerwas Reader, 171—99.

Author: C. Melissa Snarr

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA

ISBN: 9780567011114

Category: Religion

Page: 160

View: 430

Christian ethicists from a wide spectrum of methods and commitments come together in arguing for some kind of social conception of the self, noticing that convergence sheds new light on the current range of theoretical options in Christian ethics. But it also opens up an important conversation about political reform. Social visions of the self help ethicists comprehend and evaluate the moral work of institutions--comprehension that is especially important in a time of crisis for democratic participation. But not all visions of the social self are equal. Snarr's book explores and evaluates five different visions of the social self from five key ethicists (Rauschenbusch, Niebuhr, Hauerwas, Harrison, and Townes). It identifies insights and risks associated with each vision of the self and considers the adequacy of each vision for reforms that deepen democracy. The book concludes with a proposal for six core convictions about the social self that help form Christian political ethics able to respond to contemporary needs for democratic reform.
Categories: Religion

Political Theology A Guide for the Perplexed

Political Theology  A Guide for the Perplexed

5 For introductions to Hauerwas's life and work see Stanley Hauerwas, Hannah's Child: A Theologian's Memoir (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2010); and The Hauerwas Reader. 6 Stanley Hauerwas, 'A Christian Critique of Christian America', ...

Author: Elizabeth Phillips

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9780567367945

Category: Religion

Page: 208

View: 144

There is an increasingly intense interest in political theology amongst contemporary scholars and students. Yet, while there are many authors engaging in political theology, there are very few resources about political theology which aim to orient students and other recent new-comers to the field. This is a concise and accessible advanced introduction which distinguishes various approaches to political theology, and which explores several of the central issues addressed in political theologies. Theological students will be able to approach courses and readings in political theology with a renewed confidence with this overview in hand.
Categories: Religion

Keeping Faith in Faith Based Organizations

Keeping Faith in Faith Based Organizations

in The Hauerwas Reader, edited by John Berkman et al., 539–55. durham: duke University press, 2001. ———. After Christendom?: How the Church is to Behave if Freedom, Justice, and a Christian Nation are Bad Ideas. nashville: abingdon ...

Author: Dean Pallant

Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers

ISBN: 9781610979238

Category: Religion

Page: 222

View: 468

The world's poorest people are struggling to access quality, affordable health care. Change is urgently required. Faith-based organizations deliver more than 40 percent of health services in many of the poorest places. This book argues FBOs can--and must--deliver quality health services without sacrificing their faith in the process. Dean Pallant asks an awkward question: "If its faith does not drive an FBO, whose faith does?" Pallant visited Salvation Army health ministries in more than forty countries in four years, and this book records his global reflections structured around a practical theological model of enquiry. His goal is to identify a faithful future for hundreds of Salvation Army hospitals and clinics and thousands of congregation-based health ministries. Pallant finds answers in the work of Karl Polanyi, John Wesley, Stanley Hauerwas, William Booth, and Luke Bretherton, among others. Pallant challenges the bio-medical definition of health and proposes a comprehensive appreciation of people as "healthy persons"--the people God created us to be. Pallant's proposals are bold and far-reaching for the Salvation Army and other FBOs. They are insightful and challenging for everyone--of whatever faith--committed to improve the health of the poorest people.
Categories: Religion

Tensions in Christian Ethics

Tensions in Christian Ethics

Hauerwas, Stanley, A Community of Character: Towards a Constructive Christian Social Ethic, Notre Dame, IN, and London: University ... A Thought Experiment', in John Berkman and Michael Cartwright (eds), The Hauerwas Reader, Durham, NC, ...

Author: Malcolm Brown

Publisher: SPCK

ISBN: 9780281065615

Category: Religion

Page: 288

View: 566

The book draws on the author's teaching of ethics at undergraduate and postgraduate level for the Cambridge Theological Federation since 2000. Its purpose is to introduce the reader to questions in Christian ethics through a careful examination of the fundamental meta-ethical questions posed by the 'state we're in', whether understood as a new phase of modernity or as postmodernity. Brown draws on sources and authors from a variety of Christian traditions, and from Britain, the U.S.A. and Europe. The book will be of use, not only to university departments and denominational and ecumenical teaching institutions but also as a more general exposition of the current state of ethical thinking in the Christian churches.
Categories: Religion

John Howard Yoder

John Howard Yoder

See my " Review of The Politics of the Cross by Craig A. Carter and The Hauerwas Reader by Stanley Hauerwas , " The Mennonite Quarterly Review j6 ( October 2002 ) : 485-88 . 12. As a small sampling of the many issues Hauerwas has ...

Author: Mark Nation

Publisher: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing

ISBN: 0802839401

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 211

View: 527

John Howard Yoder (1927 1997) was a leading Christian witness against violence, articulating a theology from his own tradition so powerful that it compelled people from many other traditions to take notice. The war on terror, the temptations of nationalism, and the painful divisions between those who call themselves followers of Jesus signal our need to hear Yoder's voice again at the beginning of the twenty-first century. In his book Mark Thiessen Nation provides an insider's introduction to Yoder, demonstrating how a committed Mennonite could also be profoundly evangelical in his witness and broadly catholic in his Christian sensibilities. Taking us into Yoder's life and writings, Nation explores Yoder's context, his keen interest in the Anabaptist tradition, his sustained engagement with other Christians and other faiths, and his claim that pacifism is inherent to Jesus' message.
Categories: Biography & Autobiography

Practices Politics and Performance

Practices  Politics  and Performance

Drawing on the hermeneutical reflections of John Howard Yoder, Stanley Hauerwas, and Mikhail Bakhtin, Cartwright challenges the way twentieth-century American Protestants have engaged the "problem" of the use of scripture in Christian ...

Author: Michael G. Cartwright

Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers

ISBN: 9781630878627

Category: Religion

Page: 276

View: 350

Drawing on the hermeneutical reflections of John Howard Yoder, Stanley Hauerwas, and Mikhail Bakhtin, Cartwright challenges the way twentieth-century American Protestants have engaged the "problem" of the use of scripture in Christian ethics, and issues a summons for a new debate oriented by a communal approach to hermeneutics. By analyzing particular ecclesial practices that stand within living traditions of Christianity, the "politics" of scriptural interpretation can be identified along with the criteria for what a "good performance" of scripture should be. This approach to the use of scripture in Christian ethics is displayed in historical discussions of two Christian practices through which scripture is read ecclesiologically: the Eastern Orthodox liturgical celebration of the Eucharist and the Anabaptist practice of "binding and loosing" or "the rule of Christ." When American Protestants consider "performances" of scripture such as these alongside one another within more ecumenical contexts, they begin to confront the ecclesiological problem with their attempts to "use" the Bible in Christian ethics: the relative absence of constitutive ecclesial practices in American Protestant congregations that can provide moral orientation for their interpretations of Christian scripture.
Categories: Religion

Theology and Economic Ethics

Theology and Economic Ethics

109–24. Hauerwas, Stanley, 'On Keeping Theological Ethics Theological', in Stanley Hauerwas, The Hauerwas Reader, eds. John Berkman and Michael Cartwright (Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2001), pp. 51–74. Hauerwas, Stanley, 'Why the ...

Author: Sean Doherty

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 9780191008429

Category: Religion

Page: 272

View: 522

In the wake of the economic crisis, few questions are more pressing than those around the ethics of finance and economics. Theology and Economic Ethics seeks to expand the self-critical resources of contemporary theological economic ethics by bringing the method of a pre-modern thinker, Martin Luther (1483-1546), into interaction with that of a modern contribution to social ethics, the Swiss theologian Arthur Rich (1910-92). The work is undertaken through a close engagement with a selected publication of Luther (his 1519/20 Großer Sermon von dem Wucher) and of Rich (his masterwork, Wirtschaftsethik, published in two volumes in 1984 and 1990 respectively). It is the first substantial treatment in English of Rich's magnum opus. Sean Doherty introduces Luther's sermon on usury, situates it in its context, then provides a commentary on this work, discussing how Luther brings key theological motifs to bear on a particular economic question. The study proceeds with a sketch of Arthur Rich's life and work, and presents Rich's method as set out in Wirtschaftsethik. Doherty illuminates Rich's understanding of ethics, his approach to Scripture, and his adoption of the thought of Max Weber and John Rawls. Bringing insights from the study of Luther to bear in an analysis of Rich's method, Doherty questions some of Rich's assumptions, and notes ways in which a more self-critical approach could have made his project more successful. Finally, the book makes tentative suggestions as to the wider applicability of these findings for a Christian approach to economic ethics.
Categories: Religion

Implicit Epistemology in the Letters of Paul

Implicit Epistemology in the Letters of Paul

Pages 221–54 in The Hauerwas Reader . Edited by J. Burkman and M. Cartwright . Durham , N.C./ London : Duke University Press , 2001 . “ How “ Christian Ethics ' Came to Be . ” Pages 37–50 in The Hauerwas Reader .

Author: Ian W. Scott

Publisher: Mohr Siebeck

ISBN: 3161487796

Category: Religion

Page: 341

View: 505

Revised thesis (Ph.D.) - McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, 2004.
Categories: Religion

Generous Orthodoxies

Generous Orthodoxies

In The Hauerwas Reader, edited by John Berkman and Michael Cartwright, 17–32. Durham: Duke University Press, 2001. Fodor, James. “Postliberal Theology.” In The Modern Theologians: An Introduction to Christian Theology Since 1918, ...

Author: Paul Silas Peterson

Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers

ISBN: 9781498244732

Category: Religion

Page: 296

View: 558

After the birth of the Protestant ecumenical movement in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, and following the first great wave of universal Christian ecumenism in the 1960s and 1970s after the Second Vatican Council, prominent theologians of nearly every ecclesial tradition charted new territory in the last decades of the twentieth century. They crossed boundaries within their own ecclesial traditions and built bridges to other Christian churches--churches that were once excluded from fellowship. In the development of these new programs of ecumenical theology, the theologians redefined their own confessional identities and, in many cases, crossed the liberal-conservative divide within their own traditions. This volume introduces this fascinating dynamic of theological mediation, redefinition, and generosity. It shows how the ecumenical impulses, which were directed outwardly to other traditions, had reflexive effects inwardly. Working in the realms of both historical and systematic theology, the essays in this volume provide a critical analysis of the history of this general theological sentiment and offer an outlook for its future. Contributors Brian D. McLaren, Foreword Paul Silas Peterson, Introduction Part One: Ecumenical reform theologies Andrew Meszaros, Yves Congar: The Birth of "Catholic Ecumenism" Matthew L. Becker, Edmund Schlink: Ecumenical Theology Dorothea Sattler, Otto Hermann Pesch: Ecumenical Scholasticism Ronald T. Michener, George Lindbeck: Ecumenical Unity through Ecclesial Particularity Nikolaos Asproulis, John D. Zizioulas: A Pioneer of Ecumenical Dialogue and Christian Unity Part Two: Overcoming liberal-conservative polarities Ben Fulford, Hans Frei: Beyond Liberal and Conservative Friederike Nussel, Wolfhart Pannenberg: Liberal Orthodoxy Jay T. Smith, Stanley J. Grenz: The Evangelical Turn to Postliberal Theological Method Part Three: Boundary crossings in philosophical, systematic and ethical theology William E. Myatt, David Tracy: Difference, Unity, and the Analogical Imagination Christophe Chalamet, Robert Jenson: God's Way and the Ways of the Church Victoria Lorrimar, Stanley Hauerwas: Witnessing Communities of Character Christine M. Helmer, Marilyn McCord Adams: Philosophy, Theology, and Prayer Part Four: Ecumenical theology today Wolfgang Vonday, Pentecostalism and Christian Orthodoxy: Revision, Revival, and Renewal Johanna Rahner, Shifting Paradigms - Future Ecumenical Challenges Michael Amaladoss, Theology today in India: Ecumenical or interreligious? Bernd Oberdorfer, Next Steps - and Visions? Lutheran Perspectives on Doctrinal Ecumenism
Categories: Religion

Powerful Persuasion

Powerful Persuasion

See, for example, The Hauerwas Reader, edited by John Berkman and Michael Cartwright (Durham: Duke University Press, 2001), Part II. 2. See John Webster, Barth's Ethics of Reconciliation (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1995), ...

Author: Tex Sample

Publisher: Abingdon Press

ISBN: 9780687339013

Category: Religion

Page: 209

View: 520

A guide to how the church can faithfully understand and employ new technologies to communicate the gospel to the generations formed by electronic culture. When it comes to communicating the gospel through new media and technologies, churches are often faced with one of two bad options.
Categories: Religion

Handbook of Narrative Inquiry

Handbook of Narrative Inquiry

Whose science, whose knowledge: Thinking from women's lives. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press. Hauerwas, S. (2001a). Casuistry in context: The need for tradition. In J. Berkman & M. Cartwright (Eds.), The Hauerwas reader (pp.

Author: D. Jean Clandinin

Publisher: SAGE Publications

ISBN: 9781412973328

Category: Social Science

Page: 720

View: 678

Composed by international researchers, the Handbook of Narrative Inquiry: Mapping a Methodology is the first comprehensive and interdisciplinary overview of the developing methodology of narrative inquiry. The Handbook outlines the historical development and philosophical underpinnings of narrative inquiry as well as describes different forms of narrative inquiry. This one-of-a-kind volume offers an emerging map of the field and encourages further dialogue, discussion, and experimentation as the field continues to develop.
Categories: Social Science

Secret Faith in the Public Square

Secret Faith in the Public Square

Hauerwas, “On Being a Church Capable of Addressing a World at War: A Pacifist Response to the United Methodist Bishops' Pastoral In Defense of Creation,” in The Hauerwas Reader, ed. John Berkman and Michael Cartwright (Durham and ...

Author: Jonathan Malesic

Publisher: Brazos Press

ISBN: 9781587432262

Category: Religion

Page: 256

View: 106

Provocatively argues that concealing Christian identity in American public life is the best way to maintain faithful witness and integrity.
Categories: Religion