The Gulf The Making of An American Sea

The Gulf  The Making of An American Sea

Winner • Pulitzer Prize for History Winner • Kirkus Prize for Nonfiction Finalist • National Book Critics Circle Award (Nonfiction) A New York Times Notable Book of the Year Named one of the Best Books of the Year by the Washington ...

Author: Jack E. Davis

Publisher: Liveright Publishing

ISBN: 9780871408679

Category: Nature

Page: 448

View: 634

Winner of the 2018 Pulitzer Prize for History Winner of the 2017 Kirkus Prize for Nonfiction A National Book Critics Circle Award for Nonfiction Finalist A New York Times Notable Book of 2017 One of the Washington Post's Best Books of the Year In this “cri de coeur about the Gulf’s environmental ruin” (New York Times), “Davis has written a beautiful homage to a neglected sea” (front page, New York Times Book Review). Hailed as a “nonfiction epic . . . in the tradition of Jared Diamond’s best-seller Collapse, and Simon Winchester’s Atlantic” (Dallas Morning News), Jack E. Davis’s The Gulf is “by turns informative, lyrical, inspiring and chilling for anyone who cares about the future of ‘America’s Sea’ ” (Wall Street Journal). Illuminating America’s political and economic relationship with the environment from the age of the conquistadors to the present, Davis demonstrates how the Gulf’s fruitful ecosystems and exceptional beauty empowered a growing nation. Filled with vivid, untold stories from the sportfish that launched Gulfside vacationing to Hollywood’s role in the country’s first offshore oil wells, this “vast and welltold story shows how we made the Gulf . . . [into] a ‘national sacrifice zone’ ” (Bill McKibben). The first and only study of its kind, The Gulf offers “a unique and illuminating history of the American Southern coast and sea as it should be written” (Edward O. Wilson).
Categories: Nature

Race Against Time

Race Against Time

In Race against Time, Davis sensitively lays bare the need for shared control of the town's history and the acknowledgment of intercultural dependence to effect true racial equality.

Author: Jack E. Davis

Publisher: LSU Press

ISBN: 0807130273

Category: History

Page: 351

View: 136

While many studies of race relations have focused on the black experience, Race against Time strives to unravel the emotional and cultural foundations of race in the white mind. Jack E. Davis combed primary documents in Natchez, Mississippi, and absorbed the town's oral history to understand white racial attitudes there over the past seven decades, a period rich in social change, strife, and reconciliation. What he found in this community that cultivates for profit a romantic view of the Old South challenges conventional assumptions about racial prejudice. Davis engagingly and effortlessly weaves between nineteenth and twentieth centuries, white observations and black, to describe patterns of social interaction in Natchez in the workplace, education, politics, religion, and daily life. It was not, he discovers, false notions of biological differences reinforced by class and economic conflict that lay at the heart of the town's racial divide but rather the perception of a black/white cultural divergence -- in values in education, work, and family. White culture was deemed superior, a presumption manifested through a hierarchy of old-family elite and other white citizens. Since 1930, Natchez has developed a major tourist industry, downsized sharecropping, expanded its manufacturing sector, and participated in the struggles for civil rights, school desegregation, and black political empowerment. Yet the collective white perception of a mythic past has continued, reinforced through the sum of Natchez's public history -- social memory, school textbooks, breathtaking antebellum mansions, and world-famous Pilgrimage. In Race against Time, Davis sensitively lays bare the need for shared control of the town's history and the acknowledgment of intercultural dependence to effect true racial equality. Building upon the 1941 classic Deep South: A Social Anthropological Study of Caste and Class, Davis brings tremendous passion and insight to the demanding issue of race as he fathoms the contours of Natchez's distinctive racial dynamics in recent decades.
Categories: History

An Everglades Providence

An Everglades Providence

Profiles the suffragist, feminist, and environmentalist who fought for the preservation and protection of the Everglades and won the battle that turned it into a national wilderness area.

Author: Jack E. Davis

Publisher: University of Georgia Press

ISBN: 9780820330716

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 758

View: 743

Profiles the suffragist, feminist, and environmentalist who fought for the preservation and protection of the Everglades and won the battle that turned it into a national wilderness area.
Categories: Biography & Autobiography

Nature at War

Nature at War

American Environments and World War II Thomas Robertson, Richard P. Tucker, Nicholas B. Breyfogle, Peter Mansoor ... 4 Jack Davis, The Gulf: The Making of an American Sea (New York: W. W. Norton, 2017), 7. 5 Ibid., 98–99, 328–329.

Author: Thomas Robertson

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781108419765

Category: History

Page: 387

View: 910

"World War II was the largest and most destructive conflict in human history. It was an existential struggle that pitted irreconcilable political systems and ideologies against one another across the globe in a decade of violence unlike any other. There is little doubt today that the United States had to engage in the fighting, especially after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941. The conflict was, in the words of historians Allan Millett and Williamson Murray, "a war to be won." As the world's largest industrial power, the United States put forth a supreme effort to produce the weapons, munitions, and military formations essential to achieving victory. When the war finally ended, the finale signaled by atomic mushroom clouds over Hiroshima and Nagasaki, upwards of 60 million people had perished in the inferno. Of course, the human toll represented only part of the devastation; global environments also suffered greatly. The growth and devastation of the Second World War significantly changed American landscapes as well. The war created or significantly expanded a number of industries, put land to new uses, spurred urbanization, and left a legacy of pollution that would in time create a new term: Superfund site"--
Categories: History

The Boundless Sea

The Boundless Sea

McCullough, Path between the Seas, pp. 240–41. 30. Ibid., p. 254. 31. Ibid., p. 255, whence also the quotation from Roosevelt. 32. J. Davis, The Gulf: the Making of an American Sea (New York, 2017). 33. A. T. Mahan, The Influence of ...

Author: David Abulafia

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 9780199934980

Category: Navigation

Page: 1050

View: 479

"David Abulafia's new book guides readers along the world's greatest bodies of water to reveal their primary role in human history. The main protagonists are the three major oceans-the Atlantic, the Pacific, and the Indian-which together comprise the majority of the earth's water and cover over half of its surface. Over time, as passage through them gradually extended and expanded, linking first islands and then continents, maritime networks developed, evolving from local exploration to lines of regional communication and commerce and eventually to major arteries. These waterways carried goods, plants, livestock, and of course people-free and enslaved-across vast expanses, transforming and ultimately linking irrevocably the economies and cultures of Africa, Europe, Asia, and the Americas"--
Categories: Navigation

The Bald Eagle The Improbable Journey of America s Bird

The Bald Eagle  The Improbable Journey of America s Bird

Taking us from before the nation’s founding through inconceivable resurgences of this enduring all-American species, Jack E. Davis contrasts the age when native peoples lived beside it peacefully with that when others, whether through ...

Author: Jack E. Davis

Publisher: Liveright Publishing

ISBN: 9781631495267

Category: Nature

Page: 432

View: 158

From the Pulitzer Prize–winning author of The Gulf, a sweeping cultural and natural history of the bald eagle in America. The bald eagle is regal but fearless, a bird you’re not inclined to argue with. For centuries, Americans have celebrated it as “majestic” and “noble,” yet savaged the living bird behind their national symbol as a malicious predator of livestock and, falsely, a snatcher of babies. Taking us from before the nation’s founding through inconceivable resurgences of this enduring all-American species, Jack E. Davis contrasts the age when native peoples lived beside it peacefully with that when others, whether through hunting bounties or DDT pesticides, twice pushed Haliaeetus leucocephalus to the brink of extinction. Filled with spectacular stories of Founding Fathers, rapacious hunters, heroic bird rescuers, and the lives of bald eagles themselves—monogamous creatures, considered among the animal world’s finest parents—The Bald Eagle is a much-awaited cultural and natural history that demonstrates how this bird’s wondrous journey may provide inspiration today, as we grapple with environmental peril on a larger scale.
Categories: Nature

Regional Geography of the United States and Canada

Regional Geography of the United States and Canada

The ongoing and future effects of climate change on rising sea levels and hurricane intensification are only going to make serious attention to these issues that much more imperative for the ... The Gulf: The making of an American sea.

Author: Daniel R. Montello

Publisher: Waveland Press

ISBN: 9781478647126

Category: Science

Page: 602

View: 988

The fifth and thoroughly revised edition of Regional Geography of the United States and Canada provides a rich and comprehensive overview of both the physical and human geography of these two countries, and in the true spirit of geography, the interactions and interrelations of the physical and human. Following long traditions of the discipline of geography, this text incorporates words, maps, drawings, photographs, and numerical data to present its information in an engaging way. After covering beneficial precursor topics—such as the basics of physical and human geography—the text explores fifteen regions of the US and Canada. The authors observe and describe our planet’s geography in thorough and accessible detail, while laying out the spatial basics of the location, shape, and size of the different regions, and summarizes their most distinctive thematic qualities. Physical topics covered include the region’s topography and landforms, soils, climate, hydrography, vegetation, and wildlife. The human topics include the region’s population; the ethnicities and settlement history of its people; economic activities, including agriculture, forestry, mining, fishing, manufacturing, and service industries; cities; and transportation. In-depth essays expand on specific topics of interest and importance, while outlook sections prognosticate about the near future of the regions. Each chapter concludes with a bibliography of books, articles, and reports that provide further sources for the interested reader.
Categories: Science

History Lover s Guide to Florida A

History Lover s Guide to Florida  A

JACK E. DAVIS, THE GULF: THE MAKING OF AN AMERICAN SEA (Liveright Publishing) Jack Davis, a professor at the University of Florida, has emerged as one of the nation's leading environmental historians. His Pulitzer Prize–winning book ...

Author: James C. Clark

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 9781467143387

Category: History

Page: 272

View: 374

Florida is a state of transplants. Even people who relocated here decades ago still claim their birthplace as their home. They might change their mind if they knew that the Sunshine State owns one of the richest histories in the nation. Decades before the Pilgrims, the Spanish celebrated Thanksgiving in Florida. Centuries before the first St. Patrick's Day Parade in New York, the holiday was celebrated in St. Augustine, where urban renewal was underway when Jamestown settlers arrived. Author James Clark offers a lifetime of places to explore and thousands of facts to fascinate, tracing the state's long history from Pensacola to the Florida Keys.
Categories: History

The Routledge Companion to Gender and the American West

The Routledge Companion to Gender and the American West

Davis, Jack E. The Gulf: The Making of an American Sea. New York: Liveright Publishing, 2018. Flores, Richard R. Remembering the Alamo: Memory, Modernity, and the Master Symbol. 1st ed. History, Culture, and Society Series.

Author: Susan Bernardin

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781351174268

Category: Social Science

Page: 506

View: 840

This is the first major collection to remap the American West though the intersectional lens of gender and sexuality, especially in relation to race and Indigeneity. Organized through several interrelated key concepts, The Routledge Companion to Gender and the American West addresses gender and sexuality from and across diverse and divergent methodologies. Comprising 34 chapters by a team of international contributors, the Companion is divided into four parts: Genealogies Bodies Movements Lands The volume features leading and newer scholars whose essays connect interdisciplinary fields including Indigenous Studies, Latinx and Asian American Studies, Western American Studies, and Queer, Feminist, and Gender Studies. Through innovative methodologies and reclaimed archives of knowledge, contributors model fresh frameworks for thinking about relations of power and place, gender and genre, settler colonization and decolonial resistance. Even as they reckon with the ongoing gendered and racialized violence at the core of the American West, contributors forge new lexicons for imagining alternative Western futures. This pathbreaking collection will be invaluable to scholars and students studying the origins, myths, histories, and legacies of the American West. This is a foundational collection that will become invaluable to scholars and students across a range of disciplines including Gender and Sexuality Studies, Literary Studies, Indigenous Studies, and Latinx Studies.
Categories: Social Science

Water in North American Environmental History

Water in North American Environmental History

... environment/#:~:text=Effects%20of%20Dredging%20on%20the%20Marine%20Environment.%20Dredging,the%20help%20of%20the%20right%20dredgers%20and%20dredges. Davis, Jack E. (2017) The Gulf: The Making of An American Sea (New York: Liveright ...

Author: Martin V. Melosi

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 9781000592634

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 933

Water in North American Environmental History offers 25 cases studies that explore the range of uses and perceptions of water throughout Canadian, Mexican, and United States history. Water has served a myriad of purposes historically as human sustenance, agricultural irrigation, sanitation, fire protection, military defense, power generation, transportation, and much more. Water and its uses provide an excellent entrée into the study of humans and the environment, not only because water is a vital resource for life, but also because water as a medium is so intimately woven into the everyday experiences of humans and into society’s economic, political, and social fabric. A North American perspective is not representative of the world’s water use, but it is an area with a linked history and many overlapping human and environmental features and concerns. With a continental perspective, the book explores many disparate topics without being confined to the history and experiences of just one country. The chapters are short, but descriptive, and departure points for what they tell us about the human experience in dealing with water and the environmental implications of water use. The text leads students to consider water in relation to society, and to the past. The book will be of interest to students of environmental history, geography, and the environmental sciences.
Categories: History