The Fear Within

Spies, Commies, and American Democracy on Trial

Author: Scott Martelle

Publisher: Rutgers University Press

ISBN: 0813549388

Category: History

Page: 296

View: 9641

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Offers a thought-provoking history of the arrest and trial of 11 leaders of the Communist Party--USA in the late 1940s.
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Communist Rhetoric and Feminist Voices in Cold War America

Author: Jennifer Keohane

Publisher: Lexington Books

ISBN: 1498549829

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 244

View: 8815

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This book explores how women within the male-dominated Communist Party in the United States built a home for feminist ideology and practice during the early Cold War. It explores how, in pamphlets, articles, and petitions, women carefully crafted voices that spoke to the party’s concerns while challenging its theoretical and practical limitations.
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The Routledge Handbook of American Military and Diplomatic History

1865 to the Present

Author: Christos Frentzos,Antonio Thompson

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1135071020

Category: History

Page: 400

View: 3079

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The Routledge Handbook of U.S. Military and Diplomatic History provides a comprehensive analysis of the major events, conflicts, and personalities that have defined and shaped the military history of the United States in the modern period. Each chapter begins with a brief introductory essay that provides context for the topical essays that follow by providing a concise narrative of the period, highlighting some of the scholarly debates and interpretive schools of thought as well as the current state of the academic field. Starting after the Civil War, the chapters chronicle America's rise toward empire, first at home and then overseas, culminating in September 11, 2001 and the War on Terror. With authoritative and vividly written chapters by both leading scholars and new talent, maps and illustrations, and lists of further readings, this state-of-the-field handbook will be a go-to reference for every American history scholar's bookshelf.
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International Communism and the Spanish Civil War

Solidarity and Suspicion

Author: Lisa A. Kirschenbaum

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1316368920

Category: History

Page: N.A

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International Communism and the Spanish Civil War provides an intimate picture of international communism in the Stalin era. Exploring the transnational exchanges that occurred in Soviet-structured spaces - from clandestine schools for training international revolutionaries in Moscow to the International Brigades in Spain - the book uncovers complex webs of interaction, at once personal and political, that linked international communists to one another and the Soviet Union. The Spanish Civil War, which coincided with the great purges in the Soviet Union, stands at the center of this grassroots history. For many international communists, the war came to define both their life histories and political commitments. In telling their individual stories, the book calls attention to a central paradox of Stalinism - the simultaneous celebration and suspicion of transnational interactions - and illuminates the appeal of a cause that promised solidarity even as it practiced terror.
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Detroit

A Biography

Author: Scott Martelle

Publisher: Chicago Review Press

ISBN: 1613748841

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 3827

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Detroit was established as a French settlement three-quarters of a century before the founding of this nation. A remote outpost built to protect trapping interests, it grew as agriculture expanded on the new frontier. Its industry leapt forward with the completion of the Erie Canal, which opened up the Great Lakes to the East Coast. Surrounded by untapped natural resources, Detroit turned iron into stoves and railcars, and eventually cars by the millions. This vibrant commercial hub attracted businessmen and labor organizers, European immigrants and African Americans from the rural South. At its heyday in the 1950s and ’60s, one in six American jobs were connected to the auto industry and Detroit. And then the bottom fell out. Detroit: A Biography takes a long, unflinching look at the evolution of one of America’s great cities, and one of the nation’s greatest urban failures. It seeks to explain how the city grew to become the heart of American industry and how its utter collapse resulted from a confluence of public policies, private industry decisions, and deep, thick seams of racism. This updated paperback edition includes recent developments under Michigan’s Emergency Manager law. And it raises the question: when we look at modern-day Detroit, are we looking at the ghost of America’s industrial past or its future? Scott Martelle is the author of The Fear Within and Blood Passion and is a professional journalist who has written for the Detroit News, the Los Angeles Times, the Rochester Times-Union, and more.
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Dictators, Democracy, and American Public Culture

Envisioning the Totalitarian Enemy, 1920s-1950s

Author: Benjamin L. Alpers

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 0807861227

Category: History

Page: 416

View: 8748

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Focusing on portrayals of Mussolini's Italy, Hitler's Germany, and Stalin's Russia in U.S. films, magazine and newspaper articles, books, plays, speeches, and other texts, Benjamin Alpers traces changing American understandings of dictatorship from the late 1920s through the early years of the Cold War. During the early 1930s, most Americans' conception of dictatorship focused on the dictator. Whether viewed as heroic or horrific, the dictator was represented as a figure of great, masculine power and effectiveness. As the Great Depression gripped the United States, a few people--including conservative members of the press and some Hollywood filmmakers--even dared to suggest that dictatorship might be the answer to America's social problems. In the late 1930s, American explanations of dictatorship shifted focus from individual leaders to the movements that empowered them. Totalitarianism became the image against which a view of democracy emphasizing tolerance and pluralism and disparaging mass movements developed. First used to describe dictatorships of both right and left, the term "totalitarianism" fell out of use upon the U.S. entry into World War II. With the war's end and the collapse of the U.S.-Soviet alliance, however, concerns about totalitarianism lay the foundation for the emerging Cold War.
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