The Color Line and the Assembly Line

The Color Line and the Assembly Line

Focusing on Ford Motor Company’s rise to become the largest, richest, and most influential corporation in the world, The Color Line and the Assembly Line takes on the traditional story of Fordism.

Author: Elizabeth Esch

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520960886

Category: History

Page: 280

View: 855

The Color Line and the Assembly Line tells a new story of the impact of mass production on society. Global corporations based originally in the United States have played a part in making gender and race everywhere. Focusing on Ford Motor Company’s rise to become the largest, richest, and most influential corporation in the world, The Color Line and the Assembly Line takes on the traditional story of Fordism. Contrary to popular thought, the assembly line was perfectly compatible with all manner of racial practice in the United States, Brazil, and South Africa. Each country’s distinct racial hierarchies in the 1920s and 1930s informed Ford’s often divisive labor processes. Confirming racism as an essential component in the creation of global capitalism, Elizabeth Esch also adds an important new lesson showing how local patterns gave capitalism its distinctive features.
Categories: History

Collisions at the Crossroads

Collisions at the Crossroads

... Empire: Race and the Making of the Decolonizing Pacific, by Simeon Man An American Language: The History of Spanish in the United States, by Rosina Lozano The Color Line and the Assembly Line: Managing Race in the Ford Empire, ...

Author: Genevieve Carpio

Publisher: University of California Press

ISBN: 9780520298835

Category: History

Page: 392

View: 837

There are few places where mobility has shaped identity as widely as the American West, but some locations and populations sit at its major crossroads, maintaining control over place and mobility, labor and race. In Collisions at the Crossroads, Genevieve Carpio argues that mobility, both permission to move freely and prohibitions on movement, helped shape racial formation in the eastern suburbs of Los Angeles and the Inland Empire throughout the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. By examining policies and forces as different as historical societies, Indian boarding schools, bicycle ordinances, immigration policy, incarceration, traffic checkpoints, and Route 66 heritage, she shows how local authorities constructed a racial hierarchy by allowing some people to move freely while placing limits on the mobility of others. Highlighting the ways people of color have negotiated their place within these systems, Carpio reveals a compelling and perceptive analysis of spatial mobility through physical movement and residence.
Categories: History

Empire s Tracks

Empire s Tracks

... Empire: Race and the Making of the Decolonizing Pacific, by Simeon Man An American Language: The History of Spanish in the United States, by Rosina Lozano The Color Line and the Assembly Line: Managing Race in the Ford Empire, ...

Author: Manu Karuka

Publisher: University of California Press

ISBN: 9780520296626

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 586

Empire’s Tracks boldly reframes the history of the transcontinental railroad from the perspectives of the Cheyenne, Lakota, and Pawnee Native American tribes, and the Chinese migrants who toiled on its path. In this meticulously researched book, Manu Karuka situates the railroad within the violent global histories of colonialism and capitalism. Through an examination of legislative, military, and business records, Karuka deftly explains the imperial foundations of U.S. political economy. Tracing the shared paths of Indigenous and Asian American histories, this multisited interdisciplinary study connects military occupation to exclusionary border policies, a linked chain spanning the heart of U.S. imperialism. This highly original and beautifully wrought book unveils how the transcontinental railroad laid the tracks of the U.S. Empire.
Categories: History

Badges without Borders

Badges without Borders

How Global Counterinsurgency Transformed American Policing Stuart Schrader ... by Rosina Lozano The Color Line and the Assembly Line: Managing Race in the Ford Empire, by Elizabeth D. Esch Confessions of a Radical Chicano Doo-Wop Singer ...

Author: Stuart Schrader

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520968332

Category: History

Page: 416

View: 401

From the Cold War through today, the U.S. has quietly assisted dozens of regimes around the world in suppressing civil unrest and securing the conditions for the smooth operation of capitalism. Casting a new light on American empire, Badges Without Borders shows, for the first time, that the very same people charged with global counterinsurgency also militarized American policing at home. In this groundbreaking exposé, Stuart Schrader shows how the United States projected imperial power overseas through police training and technical assistance—and how this effort reverberated to shape the policing of city streets at home. Examining diverse records, from recently declassified national security and intelligence materials to police textbooks and professional magazines, Schrader reveals how U.S. police leaders envisioned the beat to be as wide as the globe and worked to put everyday policing at the core of the Cold War project of counterinsurgency. A “smoking gun” book, Badges without Borders offers a new account of the War on Crime, “law and order” politics, and global counterinsurgency, revealing the connections between foreign and domestic racial control.
Categories: History

Menace to Empire

Menace to Empire

An American Language: The History of Spanish in the United States, by Rosina Lozano 50. The Color Line and the Assembly Line: Managing Race in the Ford Empire, by Elizabeth D. Esch 51. Confessions of a Radical Chicano Doo-Wop Singer, ...

Author: Moon-Ho Jung

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520267480

Category: History

Page: 368

View: 565

"Menace to Empire is a profoundly original and ambitious book, a history of race and empire that traces both the colonial violence and the anticolonial rage that the United States spread across the Pacific between the Philippine-American War and World War II. Author Moon-Ho Jung argues that the US national security state as we know it was born out of attempts to repress and silence colonized subjects, from the Philippines and Hawai'i to California and beyond, whose anticolonial aspirations challenged US claims to sovereignty. Jung examines how the contradictions of race, nation, and empire generated waves of revolutionary movements spanning the Pacific--anticolonial, antiracist, and labor movements that exposed and confronted the US empire. In response, the US state closely monitored and brutally suppressed those movements by racializing particular politics and distinct communities as seditious, exaggerating fears of pan-Asian solidarities and sowing anti-Asian racism under the guise of national security. Menace to Empire transforms familiar themes in American history to highlight the critical role of colonial violence in the formation of radical movements and the antiradical origins of anti-Asian racism. Radicalized by their opposition to the US empire and racialized as threats to US security, peoples in and from Asia pursued a revolutionary politics that gave rise to the national security state--the heart and soul of the US empire ever since"--
Categories: History

Assimilation

Assimilation

An American Language: The History of Spanish in the United States, by Rosina Lozano 50. The Color Line and the Assembly Line: Managing Race in the Ford Empire, by Elizabeth D. Esch 51. Confessions of a Radical Chicano Doo- Wop Singer, ...

Author: Catherine S. Ramírez

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520971967

Category: Social Science

Page: 256

View: 341

For over a hundred years, the story of assimilation has animated the nation-building project of the United States. And still today, the dream or demand of a cultural "melting pot" circulates through academia, policy institutions, and mainstream media outlets. Noting society’s many exclusions and erasures, scholars in the second half of the twentieth century persuasively argued that only some social groups assimilate. Others, they pointed out, are subject to racialization. In this bold, discipline-traversing cultural history, Catherine Ramírez develops an entirely different account of assimilation. Weaving together the legacies of US settler colonialism, slavery, and border control, Ramírez challenges the assumption that racialization and assimilation are separate and incompatible processes. In fascinating chapters with subjects that range from nineteenth century boarding schools to the contemporary artwork of undocumented immigrants, this book decouples immigration and assimilation and probes the gap between assimilation and citizenship. It shows that assimilation is not just a process of absorption and becoming more alike. Rather, assimilation is a process of racialization and subordination and of power and inequality.
Categories: Social Science

Boyle Heights

Boyle Heights

An American Language: The History of Spanish in the United States, by Rosina Lozano 50. The Color Line and the Assembly Line: Managing Race in the Ford Empire, by Elizabeth D. Esch 51. Confessions of a Radical Chicano Doo-Wop Singer, ...

Author: George J. Sánchez

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520391642

Category: History

Page: 392

View: 574

The radical history of a dynamic, multiracial American neighborhood. "When I think of the future of the United States, and the history that matters in this country, I often think of Boyle Heights."--George J. Sánchez The vision for America's cross-cultural future lies beyond the multicultural myth of the "great melting pot." That idea of diversity often imagined ethnically distinct urban districts--the Little Italys, Koreatowns, and Jewish quarters of American cities--built up over generations and occupying spaces that excluded one another. But the neighborhood of Boyle Heights shows us something altogether different: a dynamic, multiracial community that has forged solidarity through a history of social and political upheaval. Boyle Heights is an in-depth history of the Los Angeles neighborhood, showcasing the potent experiences of its residents, from early contact between Spanish colonizers and native Californians to the internment of Japanese Americans during World War II, the hunt for hidden Communists among the Jewish population, negotiating citizenship and belonging among Latino migrants and Mexican American residents, and beyond. Through each period and every struggle, the residents of Boyle Heights have maintained remarkable solidarity across racial and ethnic lines, acting as a unified polyglot community even as their tribulations have become more explicitly racial in nature. Boyle Heights is immigrant America embodied, and it can serve as the true beacon on a hill toward which the country can strive in a time when racial solidarity and civic resistance have never been in greater need.
Categories: History

Pacific Confluence

Pacific Confluence

We Sell Drugs: The Alchemy of US Empire, by Suzanna Reiss 40. ... Flavors of Empire: Food and the Making of Thai America, by Mark Padoongpatt 46. ... The Color Line and the Assembly Line: Managing Race in the Ford Empire ...

Author: Christen T. Sasaki

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520382756

Category: Hawaii

Page: 266

View: 515

"The period between the illegal overthrow of the Hawaiian monarchy and US annexation (1893-98) is often framed as an inevitable step of American expansion--but it was never a foregone conclusion. By pairing the intimate and epic together in critical juxtaposition, Christen T. Sasaki reveals the unstable nature not just of the coup state, but of the US empire itself. The attempt to create a US-backed white settler state in Hawai'i sparked a turn-of-the-century debate about race-based nationalism and state-based sovereignty and jurisdiction that was fought on the global stage. Centered around a series of 'flash points' that exposed the fragility of the imperial project, Pacific Confluence examines how the meeting and mixing of ideas that occurred between Hawaiian and Japanese, white American, and Portuguese transients and settlers led to the dynamic rethinking of the modern nation-state"--
Categories: Hawaii

Archipelago of Resettlement

Archipelago of Resettlement

An American Language: The History of Spanish in the United States, by Rosina Lozano 50. The Color Line and the Assembly Line: Managing Race in the Ford Empire, by Elizabeth D. Esch 51. Confessions of a Radical Chicano Doo-Wop Singer, ...

Author: Evyn Lê Espiritu Gandhi

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520976832

Category:

Page: 284

View: 935

A free open access ebook is available upon publication. Learn more at www.luminosoa.org. What happens when refugees encounter Indigenous sovereignty struggles in the countries of their resettlement? From April to November 1975, the US military processed over 112,000 Vietnamese refugees on the unincorporated territory of Guam; from 1977 to 1979, the State of Israel granted asylum and citizenship to 366 non-Jewish Vietnamese refugees. Evyn Lê Espiritu Gandhi analyzes these two cases to theorize what she calls the refugee settler condition: the fraught positionality of refugee subjects whose resettlement in a settler colonial state is predicated on the unjust dispossession of an Indigenous population. This groundbreaking book explores two forms of critical geography: first, archipelagos of empire, examining how the Vietnam War is linked to the US military buildup in Guam and unwavering support of Israel, and second, corresponding archipelagos of trans-Indigenous resistance, tracing how Chamorro decolonization efforts and Palestinian liberation struggles are connected through the Vietnamese refugee figure. Considering distinct yet overlapping modalities of refugee and Indigenous displacement, Gandhi offers tools for imagining emergent forms of decolonial solidarity between refugee settlers and Indigenous peoples.
Categories:

The Deportation Express

The Deportation Express

An American Language: The History of Spanish in the United States, by Rosina Lozano 50. The Color Line and the Assembly Line: Managing Race in the Ford Empire, by Elizabeth D. Esch 51. Confessions of a Radical Chicano Doo-Wop Singer, ...

Author: Ethan Blue

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520973107

Category: History

Page: 448

View: 236

A history of the United States' systematic expulsion of "undesirables" and immigrants, told through the lives of the passengers who travelled from around the world, only to be locked up and forced out aboard America's first deportation trains. The United States, celebrated as a nation of immigrants and the land of the free, has developed the most extensive system of imprisonment and deportation that the world has ever known. The Deportation Express is the first history of American deportation trains: a network of prison railroad cars repurposed by the Immigration Bureau to link jails, hospitals, asylums, and workhouses across the country and allow forced removal with terrifying efficiency. With this book, historian Ethan Blue uncovers the origins of the deportation train and finds the roots of the current moment, as immigrant restriction and mass deportation once again play critical and troubling roles in contemporary politics and legislation. A century ago, deportation trains made constant circuits around the nation, gathering so-called "undesirable aliens"—migrants disdained for their poverty, political radicalism, criminal conviction, or mental illness—and conveyed them to ports for exile overseas. Previous deportation procedures had been violent, expensive, and relatively ad hoc, but the railroad industrialized the expulsion of the undesirable. Trains provided a powerful technology to divide "citizens" from "aliens" and displace people in unprecedented numbers. Drawing on the lives of migrants and the agents who expelled them, The Deportation Express is history told from aboard a deportation train. By following the lives of selected individuals caught within the deportation regime, this book dramatically reveals how the forces of state exclusion accompanied epic immigration in early twentieth-century America. These are the stories of people who traveled from around the globe, only to be locked up and cast out, deported through systems that bound the United States together, and in turn, pulled the world apart. Their journey would be followed by millions more in the years to come.
Categories: History