Ha sad ta

Ha sad ta

In the twelfth century, Dhoyi imitated Kali dasa's masterpiece in "The Wind Messenger." Dhoyi's sentiments of love are blended with praise of the poet's royal patron King Lakshmana sena of Gauda (Bengal).

Author: Kālidāsa

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 9780814757147

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 293

View: 236

Sanskrit messenger poems evoke the pain of separated sweethearts through the formula of an estranged lover pleading with a messenger to take a message to his or her beloved. The plea includes a lyrical description of the route the messenger will take, as well as the message itself. In the fifth century C.E., Sanskrit's finest poet, Kali dasa, composed "The Cloud Messenger." The beautiful and pure expression of an exiled lover's longing is among the best known and most treasured of all Sanskrit poems. In the twelfth century, Dhoyi imitated Kali dasa's masterpiece in "The Wind Messenger." Dhoyi's sentiments of love are blended with praise of the poet's royal patron King Lakshmana sena of Gauda (Bengal). Numerous more followed, including the third in the CSL selection, the sixteenth-century "Swan Messenger," composed also in Bengal by Rupa Go svamin, a devotee of Krishna. Here romantic and religious love combine in a poem that shines with the intensity of love for the god Krishna.
Categories: Literary Collections

The Complete Clay Sanskrit Library

The Complete Clay Sanskrit Library

The Clay Sanskrit Library, co-published by NYU Press and the JJC Foundation, has been created to introduce classical Sanskrit literature to a wide international readership.

Author: Clay Sanskrit Library

Publisher: Clay Sanskrit

ISBN: 0814717438

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 17500

View: 694

The Clay Sanskrit Library, co-published by NYU Press and the JJC Foundation, has been created to introduce classical Sanskrit literature to a wide international readership. This literature combines great beauty, enormous variety and more than three thousand years of continuous history and development. Twenty-eight leading scholars from eight countries cooperated to produce fresh new translations that combine readability and accuracy. The first twelve titles appeared in February 2005, and by 2009 the library was completed with 56 published volumes. The selection includes drama, poetry and novels, together with the famous epics. The Library is now also available as a 56-volume complete set, as well as in six thematic mini-sets, grouped for readers interested in specific areas of the world of classical Sanskrit literature.
Categories: Literary Collections

Handsome Nanda

Handsome Nanda

Here is a new Clay Sanskrit Library translation of Ashva-ghosha's Handsome Nanda.

Author: Aśvaghoṣa

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 9780814716830

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 387

View: 764

Here is a new Clay Sanskrit Library translation of Ashva-ghosha's Handsome Nanda. Nanda has it all - youth, money, good looks and a kittenish wife who fulfills his sexual and emotional needs. He also has the Buddha, a dispassionate man of immense insight and self-containment, for an older brother. When Nanda is made a reluctant recruit to the Buddha's order of monks, he is forced to confront his all-too-human enslavement to his erotic and romantic desires. Dating from the second century CE, Handsome Nanda portrays its hero's spiritual makeover with compassion, psychological profundity and great poetic skill. The Buddhist monk Ashva-ghosha's ancient composition succeeds both as a work of poetry and as a Buddhist spiritual biography. Native of Saket, perhaps Ashva-ghosha too had been torn between his celibacy-demanding faith and a beloved woman. Nanda is not alone in being cured by the Buddha's sugar-coated bitter pills; the famous penultimate verse identifies all who hear or read Handsome Nanda as patients on the path to liberation, because we have savored the medicine that is bottled in this honeyed poem.
Categories: Literary Collections

A Sanskrit Treasury

A Sanskrit Treasury

This beautiful collection brings together passages from the renowned stories, poems, dramas and myths of Classical Asian literature, including the Mahābhārata and the Rāmāyaṇa.

Author: Camillo A. Formigatti

Publisher:

ISBN: 1851245316

Category: Manuscripts, Sanskrit

Page: 240

View: 646

This beautiful collection brings together passages from the renowned stories, poems, dramas and myths of South Asian literature, including the Mahābhārata and the Rāmāyaṇa. Drawing on the translations published by the Clay Sanskrit Library, the book presents episodes from the adventures of young Krishna, the life of Prince Rāma and Hindu foundational myths, the life of the Buddha, as well as Buddhist and Jaina birth stories.Pairing key excerpts from these wonderful Sanskrit texts with exquisite illustrations from the Bodleian Library's rich manuscript collections, the book includes images of birch-bark and palm-leaf manuscripts, vibrant Mughal miniatures, early printed books, sculptures, watercolour paintings and even early photograph albums.Each extract is presented in both English translation and Sanskrit in Devanāgarī script, and is accompanied by a commentary on the literature and related books and artworks. The collection is organised by geographical region and includes sections on the Himalayas, North India, Central and South India, Sri Lanka and South East Asia, Tibet, Inner and East Asia, and the Middle East and Europe.This is the perfect introduction for anyone interested in Sanskrit literature and the manuscript art of South Asia - and beyond.
Categories: Manuscripts, Sanskrit

Bhatti s Poem The Death of Ravana

Bhatti   s Poem  The Death of Ravana

To the dry bones of grammar Bhatti gave juicy flesh in his poem, telling the Indian story in Sanskrit. This book is both a poetic retelling of Rama's adventures, and a compendium of grammatical and rhetorical examples for students.

Author: Bhaṭṭi

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 9780814727782

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 524

View: 235

To the dry bones of grammar Bhatti gave juicy flesh in his poem, telling the greatest Indian story in elegant Sanskrit. Composed in the fourth century CE, in South India, ”Bhatti’s Poem: The Death of Rávana” is both a poetic retelling of Rama’s adventures, and a compendium of grammatical and rhetorical examples for students. Bhatti’s study aid to Pánini’s groundbreaking grammatical treatise, the “Eight Books,” gives examples disguised as the gripping, morally improving “Ramáyana” story. In Bhatti’s own words: “This composition is a lamp to those whose eyes have language as their goal.” Tradition has it that an elephant ambled between Bhatti and his pupils, interrupting their outdoors grammar class. By Hindu law this intrusion canceled class for a year. Lest time be lost, Bhatti composed his poem to teach grammar without textbooks. Ever since, “The Death of Rávana” has been one of the most popular poems in Sanskrit literature.
Categories: Literary Collections

R ma Beyond Price

R ma Beyond Price

This is the first English translation of the only surviving work by Murári, a brahmin court poet, who lived some time between the eighth and tenth century CE, perhaps in Orissa or in neighboring South India.

Author: Murāri

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 9780814782958

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 638

View: 639

Rama Beyond Price, a dramatized remake of the Ramáyana, is one of the most challenging pieces of Sanskrit poetry to read. Because of its elegant style, learned allusions, and often striking imagery, the poem has been a favorite among pundits. The well-known epic story of Rama’s exploits is presented as a series of political intrigues and battles, and contrasted with lyrical passages of various kinds: on love and war, pride and honor, gods and demons, rites and myths, regions and cities of ancient India. This is the first English translation of the only surviving work by Murári, a brahmin court poet, who lived some time between the eighth and tenth century CE, perhaps in Orissa or in neighboring South India. Co-published by New York University Press and the JJC Foundation For more on this title and other titles in the Clay Sanskrit series, please visit http://www.claysanskritlibrary.org
Categories: Literary Collections

Mahabharata

Mahabharata

First Edition 2008 The Clay Sanskrit Library is co-published by New York
University Press and the JJC Foundation. Further information about this volume
and the rest of the Clay Sanskrit Library is available at the end of this book and
on the ...

Author:

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 9780814716960

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 610

View: 881

'Bhishma' narrates the first ten days of the great war between the Káuravas and the Pándavas. This first volume covers four days from the beginning of the great battle and includes the famous Bhágavad-gita (the song of the Lord), presented here within its original epic context.
Categories: Literary Collections

The Epitome of Queen Lilavati

The Epitome of Queen Lilavati

Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data Jinaratnasri, 13th cent. [
Lilavatisara. English & Sanskrit The epitome of Queen Lilavati / by Jinaratna ;
edited and translated by R.C.C. Fynes. p. cm. - (The Clay Sanskrit library) Poem.

Author: Jinaratna

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 9780814727416

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 543

View: 164

Jain monk and poet, Jina-ratna tells the stories of a group of souls as they pass through a series of embodiments on their way to final liberation from the continual cycle of death and rebirth. The Epitome of Queen Lilavati abounds in memorable incidents and characters, such as Dhana, the rich merchant who attempts to justify cheating in trade; Padma-ratha, who, while invisible, attempts to seduce the ladies of the royal household; and Vasundhara, the bogus holy man who is caught in a compromising position with a female dog. The purpose of these stories, which are related to Queen Lilavati and her husband, King Simha, by the teacher-monk Samara-sena, is to promote the ethic of Jainism, which holds that strict adherence to a non-violent way of life is the key to liberation from the troubles of the world. In the end, Queen Lilavati, King Simha and the other leading characters attain perfect knowledge and liberation.
Categories: Literary Collections

Bhatti s Poem The Death of Ravana

Bhatti   s Poem  The Death of Ravana

First Edition 2009 The Clay Sanskrit Library is co-published by New York
University Press and the JJC Foundation. Further information about this volume
and the rest of the Clay Sanskrit Library is available at the end of this book and
on the ...

Author:

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 9781479886937

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 550

View: 298

To the dry bones of grammar Bhatti gave juicy flesh in his poem, telling the greatest Indian story in elegant Sanskrit. Composed in the fourth century CE, in South India, ”Bhatti’s Poem: The Death of Rávana” is both a poetic retelling of Rama’s adventures, and a compendium of grammatical and rhetorical examples for students. Bhatti’s study aid to Pánini’s groundbreaking grammatical treatise, the “Eight Books,” gives examples disguised as the gripping, morally improving “Ramáyana” story. In Bhatti’s own words: “This composition is a lamp to those whose eyes have language as their goal.” Tradition has it that an elephant ambled between Bhatti and his pupils, interrupting their outdoors grammar class. By Hindu law this intrusion canceled class for a year. Lest time be lost, Bhatti composed his poem to teach grammar without textbooks. Ever since, “The Death of Rávana” has been one of the most popular poems in Sanskrit literature.
Categories: Literary Collections

These My Words

These My Words

The Penguin Book of Indian Poetry Eunice de Souza. Introduction. 1 Poem 887,
The Absent Traveller, selected and trans. Arvind Krishna Mehrotra ... Lee Siegel,
Clay Sanskrit Library Series, New York University Press, 2009. 6 John Brough ...

Author: Eunice de Souza

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN: 9788184757934

Category: Poetry

Page: 476

View: 541

The ultimate anthology of Indian poetry from the Vedas to the present in all the major Indian languages These My Words is an anthology of magnificent breadth, ranging from Valmiki to Agha Shahid Ali, Aurobindo to Vikram Seth, Andal to Tagore, spanning Indian poetry in its myriad forms, styles and languages. The poems speak for themselves and to each other, as folk songs and tribal epics sit alongside classical Sanskrit and formal Tamil verse is a companion to contemporary Bengali or Dogri. There is Ghalib in praise of love, Tukaram on religious bigotry, Ksetrayya on divine love through the erotic, Gieve Patel on identity. In Eunice de Souza and Melanie Silgardo’s carefully curated selection, each poem illumines exquisitely the tradition of Indian poetry.
Categories: Poetry

Mahabharata

Mahabharata

Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data Mah ̄abh ̄arata. Vir ̄at.
aparva. English & Sanskrit. Mah ̄abh ̄arata. Book four, Vir ̄at.a / translated by
Kathleen Garbutt. p. cm. – (The Clay Sanskrit library) Epic poetry. In English and
 ...

Author: Vyāsa

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 9780814731833

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 516

View: 872

This text details the Pándavas' 13th year in exile, when they live disguised in King Viráta's court. They suffer the humiliation of becoming servants. Having maintained their disguise until the very end of the year, then their troubles really begin.
Categories: Literary Collections

R m ya a

R m ya a

English & Sanskrit Ramayana. Book five, Sundara / by Valmiki ; translated by
Robert P. Goldman and Sally J. Sutherland Goldman. p. cm. - (The Clay Sanskrit
library) Epic poetry. In English and Sanskrit (romanized) on facing pages;
translated ...

Author: Valmiki

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 9780814731789

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 538

View: 330

Here is a new Clay Sanskrit Library publication of "Sundara," Book Five of Valmiki's Ramayana, the source revered throughout India as the original account of the career of Rama, ideal man and incarnation of the great god Vishnu. After his great leap, Hanuman finds and explores the demons' city. The poet describes the opulence of the court of the demon king, Ravana, the beauty of his harem, and the hideous deformity of Sita's wardresses. Hanuman witnesses Sita's stern rejection of Ravana's blandishments, reveals himself to the princess, shows her Rama's signet ring as proof of identity, and offers to carry her back to her husband. She nevertheless insists that Rama must come himself to avenge the abduction. The mighty monkey then wreaks havoc and fights a series of hair-raising battles. Captured by the warrior Indrajit, Hanuman admonishes Ravana for his lechery. His tail set ablaze, he escapes his bonds and sets fire to the city. Taking leave of Sita, Hanuman once more leaps the ocean to rejoin his monkey companions and tell Rama what has happened.
Categories: Literary Collections

Maha Bharata

Maha Bharata

Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data Mah ̄abh ̄arata. Karn.
aparva. English & Sanskrit. Mah ̄abh ̄arata. Book eight, Karn.a / translated by
Adam Bowles. – 1st ed. p. cm. – (The Clay Sanskrit library) Epic poetry. In English
 ...

Author: Vyāsa

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 9780814799819

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 604

View: 510

“The Book of Karna” relates the events of the two dramatic days after the defeat of the great warriors and generals Bhishma and Drona, in which Karna, great hero and the eldest Pándava, leads the Káurava army into combat. This first volume of "Karna" depicts mighty battles in gory detail, sets the scene for Karna's tragic death, and includes a remarkable verbal duel between Karna and his reluctant charioteer Shalya, the king of the Madras, as they hurl abuse at each other before entering the fray. Co-published by New York University Press and the JJC Foundation For more on this title and other titles in the Clay Sanskrit series, please visit http://www.claysanskritlibrary.org
Categories: Literary Collections

Extreme Poetry

Extreme Poetry

“Double-Bodied Poem, Double-Bodied Poet: Ravicandra's Commentary on the
Amaruśatakam and the Rules of Sanskrit Literary Interpretation.” Journal of ... “
Sanskrit Poetry in Search of a History: The Case of Ślesa. ... Clay Sanskrit Library
.

Author: Yigal Bronner

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 9780231525299

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 376

View: 113

Beginning in the sixth century C.E. and continuing for more than a thousand years, an extraordinary poetic practice was the trademark of a major literary movement in South Asia. Authors invented a special language to depict both the apparent and hidden sides of disguised or dual characters, and then used it to narrate India's major epics, the Ramayana and the Mahabharata, simultaneously. Originally produced in Sanskrit, these dual narratives eventually worked their way into regional languages, especially Telugu and Tamil, and other artistic media, such as sculpture. Scholars have long dismissed simultaneous narration as a mere curiosity, if not a sign of cultural decline in medieval India. Yet Yigal Bronner's Extreme Poetry effectively negates this position, proving that, far from being a meaningless pastime, this intricate, "bitextual" technique both transcended and reinvented Sanskrit literary expression. The poems of simultaneous narration teased and estranged existing convention and showcased the interrelations between the tradition's foundational texts. By focusing on these achievements and their reverberations through time, Bronner rewrites the history of Sanskrit literature and its aesthetic goals. He also expands on contemporary theories of intertextuality, which have been largely confined to Western texts and practices.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Mahabharata

Mahabharata

Dron.aparvan. English & Sanskrit. Mahabharata. Book seven, Drona / translated
by Vaughan Pilikian. – 1st ed. p. cm. – (The Clay Sanskrit library) Includes
bibliographical references and index. Epic poetry. In English and Sanskrit (
romanized) ...

Author: Vaughan Pilikian

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 0814767230

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 473

View: 635

After Bhishma is cut down at the end of the previous book of the Maha·bhárata, the book which bears his name, Duryódhana selects Drona as leader of his forces. Drona accepts the honor with Bhishma's blessing, despite his ongoing personal conflicts as mentor to both the Pándava and Káurava heroes in their youth. The fighting rages on, with heavy losses on both sides. Furious and frustrated, Duryódhana accuses Drona of collaborating with the enemy, but he replies that as long as Árjuna is on the field, the Pándavas will remain invincible. When Árjuna is finally diverted from the main action of the battle, Yudhi·shthira entrusts Árjuna's son Abhimányu with the task of making a breach in the Káurava formation. Abhimányu rampages through Drona's army, but at last is cornered by several Káurava warriors and finally killed by Jayad·ratha. Co-published by New York University Press and the JJC Foundation For more on this title and other titles in the Clay Sanskrit series, please visit http://www.claysanskritlibrary.org
Categories: Literary Collections

Kalivi ambana

Kalivi ambana

While Bhállata suffered a humiliating fall from his high rank of court-poet,
Ksheméndra was an independently wealthy man ... "Detached poems" are
usually classified as being “free of I5 CLAY SANSKRIT LIBRARY THREE
SATIRES TRANSL.

Author: Nīlakaṇṭha Dīkṣita

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 9780814788141

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 403

View: 865

Written over a period of eight hundred years, these works represent alternative approaches to satire. Bhallata sought vengeance on his boorish new king by producing vicious sarcastic verse, "The Hundred Allegories." The disgruntled ninth-century CE court poet speaks of a setting sun, his former king and patron Avanti-varman, being replaced by a flickering firefly, the new king Shankara-varman, who did not continue his predecessor's patronage. The artistry that captivates the Kashmirian Kshemendra in the eleventh century in "The Grace of Guile" is as varied as human nature and just as fallible. He presents himself as a social reformer out to shame the complacent into compliance with Vedic morality. In the seventeenth century CE, Nila-kantha gets straight to the point in his "Mockery of the Kali Era": little can redeem the fallen characters he portrays, so his duty is simply to warn about the corruption of academics, sorcerers, astrologers, physicians, poets, relatives, and others.
Categories: Literary Collections

American Book Publishing Record

American Book Publishing Record

Arabic poetry - Saudi Arabia — Translations into English . 3. Folk poetry ...
Selections II . Title . A crack in the wall : 892.7'1008 new Arab poetry / edited by
Margaret Obank and Samuel Shimon . ... ( The Clay Sanskrit library ) Play .
Includes ...

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN: UOM:39015066180418

Category: American literature

Page:

View: 290

Categories: American literature

The Recognition of Shak ntala

The Recognition of Shak  ntala

It is right that poets should fall silent upon hearing the Kádambari, for the sacred
law rules that recitation must be ... EDITED BY Somadeva Vasudeva (csl–5.1)
VERSION 4.5 INTRODUCTION CLAY SANSKRIT LIBRARY SAKUNTALA.
EDITED ...

Author: Kālidāsa

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 0814788157

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 419

View: 455

The play Shakuntala was one of the first examples of Indian literature to be read in translation in Europe. Shakuntala's story is a leitmotiv that recurs in many works of Indian literature and culminates in the master Kali-dasa's drama for the stage. The virtuous heroine is forgotten by her betrothed, the king Dushyanta, only to be refound thanks to a distinguishing signet ring discovered by a fisherman in the belly of one of his catch. The final act distills the essence of human forgiveness, in Shakuntala's gracious release of her husband from his guilt.
Categories: Literary Collections

Seven Hundred Elegant Verses

Seven Hundred Elegant Verses

Co-published by New York University Press and the JJC Foundation For more on this title and other titles in the Clay Sanskrit series, please visit http://www.claysanskritlibrary.org

Author: Govardhana

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 9780814737378

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 352

View: 408

When Go·várdhana composed his "Seven Hundred Elegant Verses" in Sanskrit in the twelfth century CE, the title suggested that this was a response to the 700 verses in the more demotic Prakrit language traditionally attributed to King Hala, composed almost a thousand years earlier. Both sets of poems were composed in the arya metre. Besides being the name of a metre, in Sanskrit arya means a noble or elegant lady, and Go·várdhana wished to reflect and appeal to a sophisticated culture. These poems each consist of a single stanza, almost as condensed and allusive as a Japanese haiku. They cover the gamut of human life and emotion, though the favorite topic is love in all its aspects. Co-published by New York University Press and the JJC Foundation For more on this title and other titles in the Clay Sanskrit series, please visit http://www.claysanskritlibrary.org
Categories: Literary Collections

R k asa s Ring

R k asa s Ring

It is right that poets should fall silent upon hearing the Kádambari, for the sacred
law rules that recitation must be suspended when the sound of ...
Soméshvaradeva's “Moonlight of Glory” I.15 I2 CLAY SANSKRIT LIBRARY
MUDRARAKSASA.

Author: Viśākhadatta

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 081471661X

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 385

View: 456

This political drama is set just after Alexander's invasion of India (c. 325 BCE) when the first Emperor Chandra-gupta seized the throne and founded the Maurya dynasty. The exemplary Rakshasa is the loyal exiled chief minister of the deposed dynasty. But his opponent, far from being the villain of the piece, is a kind of superhero - the inhumanly competent ascetic Kautilya, to whom is ascribed India's famous handbook for rulers, a precursor to Machiavelli's. Kautilya struggles not to destroy Rakshasa but to win him over to be his successor as Chandra-gupta's chief minister, so that Kautilya himself can retire from politics. The final, benedictory stanza of the play may refer to Emperor Chandra-gupta II (reigned c. 376-415 BC). Other than this clue to the time during which the author lived, all we know about him is that he came from a princely family, and would have had political experience.
Categories: Literary Collections