The Brass Check

The Brass Check

So throughout this book I have not laid much stress on the book's title. Perhaps
you are wondering just where the title comes in! What is the Brass Check? The
Brass Check is found in your payenvelope every week—you who write and print
 ...

Author: Upton Sinclair

Publisher: Open Road Media

ISBN: 9781504026116

Category: Political Science

Page: 446

View: 861

A muckraking exposé of corruption in American journalism from the Pulitzer Prize–winning author of The Jungle Upton Sinclair dedicated his life to documenting the destructive force of unbridled capitalism. In this influential study, he takes on the effect of money and power on mass media, arguing that the newspapers, magazines, and wire services of the Progressive era formed “a class institution serving the rich and spurning the poor.” In the early twentieth century, a “brass check” was a token purchased by brothel patrons. By drawing a comparison between journalists and prostitutes, Sinclair highlights the total control publishers such as William Randolph Hearst exerted over their empires. Reporters and editors were paid to service the financial and political interests of their bosses, even if that meant misrepresenting the facts or outright lying. Sinclair documents specific cases, including the Ludlow Massacre of 1914 and the Red Scare whipped up by Hearst’s New York Journal and other newspapers, in which major news outlets ignored the truth in favor of tabloid sensationalism. Sinclair considered The Brass Check to be his most important and most dangerous book. Nearly a century later, his impassioned call for reform is timelier than ever. This ebook has been authorized by the estate of Upton Sinclair.
Categories: Political Science

The Crimes of the Times

The Crimes of the  Times

Author: Upton Sinclair

Publisher:

ISBN: UCAL:B3135239

Category: Freedom of the press

Page: 31

View: 930

Categories: Freedom of the press

Key Readings in Journalism

Key Readings in Journalism

THE. BRASS. CHECK. WHEN. UPTON SINCLAIR PUBLISHED The Jungle in
1906, it changed his career. Not only did the book turn him into a national figure
at age 28, but also by the end of 1906 the book had earned him $30,000, a very ...

Author: Elliot King

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9780415880275

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 413

View: 277

This work brings together the essential writings that every student of journalism should know. It presents 40 of the most important works about journalism arranged thematically to enable students to think deeply and broadly about journalism - its social impact, its history, key individuals and institutions, its practice and its future.
Categories: Language Arts & Disciplines

The Man Who Sold America

The Man Who Sold America

Story of Albert D. Lasker and the Creation of the Advertising Century Jeffrey L.
Cruikshank, Arthur W. Schultz ... In domain after domain, he accumulated both
impassioned followers and embittered enemies.23 In The Brass Check (1919), ...

Author: Jeffrey L. Cruikshank

Publisher: Harvard Business Press

ISBN: 9781422161777

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 480

View: 669

We live in an age of persuasion. Leaders and institutions of every kind--public and private, large and small--must compete in the marketplace of images and messages. This has been true since the advent of mass media, from broad circulation magazines and radio through the age of television and the internet. Yet there have been very few true geniuses at the art of mass persuasion in the last century. In public relations, Edward Bernays comes to mind. In advertising, most Hall-of-Famers--J. Walter Thomson, David Ogilvy, Bill Bernbach, Bruce Barton, Ray Rubicam, and others--point to one individual as the "father" of modern advertising: Albert D. Lasker. And yet Lasker--unlike Bernays, Thomson, Ogilvy, and the others--remains an enigma. Now, Jeffrey Cruikshank and Arthur Schultz, having uncovered a treasure trove of Lasker's papers, have written a fascinating and revealing biography of one of the 20th century's most powerful, intriguing, and instructive figures. It is no exaggeration to say that Lasker created modern advertising. He was the first influential proponent of "reason why" advertising, a consumer-centered approach that skillfully melded form and content and a precursor to the "unique selling proposition" approach that today dominates the industry. More than that, he was a prominent political figure, champion of civil rights, man of extreme wealth and hobnobber with kings and maharajahs, as well as with the likes of Albert Einstein and Eleanor Roosevelt. He was also a deeply troubled man, who suffered mental collapses throughout his adult life, though was able fight through and continue his amazing creative and productive activities into later life. This is the story of a man who shaped an industry, and in many ways, shaped a century.
Categories: Business & Economics

CBS s Don Hollenbeck

CBS   s Don Hollenbeck

9. Press criticism: from name-calling to nuance 1. Max Lerner, “The Six Deadly
Press Sins,” PM, December 4, 1947, 12. 2. Leon Harris, Upton Sinclair: American
Rebel (New York: Crowell, 1975), 37, 178; Upton Sinclair, The Brass Check: A ...

Author: Loren Ghiglione

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 9780231516891

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 352

View: 342

Loren Ghiglione recounts the fascinating life and tragic suicide of Don Hollenbeck, the controversial newscaster who became a primary target of McCarthyism's smear tactics. Drawing on unsealed FBI records, private family correspondence, and interviews with Walter Cronkite, Mike Wallace, Charles Collingwood, Douglas Edwards, and more than one hundred other journalists, Ghiglione writes a balanced biography that cuts close to the bone of this complicated newsman and chronicles the stark consequences of the anti-Communist frenzy that seized America in the late 1940s and 1950s. Hollenbeck began his career at the Lincoln, Nebraska Journal (marrying the boss's daughter) before becoming an editor at William Randolph Hearst's rip-roaring Omaha Bee-News. He participated in the emerging field of photojournalism at the Associated Press; assisted in creating the innovative, ad-free PM newspaper in New York City; reported from the European theater for NBC radio during World War II; and anchored television newscasts at CBS during the era of Edward R. Murrow. Hollenbeck's pioneering, prize-winning radio program, CBS Views the Press (1947-1950), was a declaration of independence from a print medium that had dominated American newsmaking for close to 250 years. The program candidly criticized the prestigious New York Times, the Daily News (then the paper with the largest circulation in America), and Hearst's flagship Journal-American and popular morning tabloid Daily Mirror. For this honest work, Hollenbeck was attacked by conservative anti-Communists, especially Hearst columnist Jack O'Brian, and in 1954, plagued by depression, alcoholism, three failed marriages, and two network firings (and worried about a third), Hollenbeck took his own life. In his investigation of this amazing American character, Ghiglione reveals the workings of an industry that continues to fall victim to censorship and political manipulation. Separating myth from fact, CBS's Don Hollenbeck is the definitive portrait of a polarizing figure who became a symbol of America's tortured conscience.
Categories: Performing Arts

Manual of Accounting and Auditing Requirements Covering Cost plus a fixed fee Contracts for Veterans Educational Facilities Program

Manual of Accounting and Auditing Requirements Covering Cost plus a fixed fee Contracts for Veterans  Educational Facilities Program

This information shall be obtained direct from the Brass Check Board directly
after the start of the shift . . b . The identification numbers of employees who check
in or are hired after the beginning of the shift shall be listed immediately following
 ...

Author: United States. Bureau of Community Facilities

Publisher:

ISBN: UOM:39015086719179

Category: Finance, Public

Page: 66

View: 613

Categories: Finance, Public

The Watchdog That Didn t Bark

The Watchdog That Didn t Bark

The push-me-pull-you struggle between access and accountability was about to
lurch again. Many people over the years have tried to puzzle through the
question of why the news looks the way it does. In The Brass Check, a 1919
exposé of ...

Author: Dean Starkman

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 9780231536288

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 382

View: 579

The Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter details “how the U.S. business press could miss the most important economic implosion of the past eighty years” (Eric Alterman, media columnist for The Nation). In this sweeping, incisive post-mortem, Dean Starkman exposes the critical shortcomings that softened coverage in the business press during the mortgage era and the years leading up to the financial collapse of 2008. He examines the deep cultural and structural shifts—some unavoidable, some self-inflicted—that eroded journalism’s appetite for its role as watchdog. The result was a deafening silence about systemic corruption in the financial industry. Tragically, this silence grew only more profound as the mortgage madness reached its terrible apogee from 2004 through 2006. Starkman frames his analysis in a broad argument about journalism itself, dividing the profession into two competing approaches—access reporting and accountability reporting—which rely on entirely different sources and produce radically different representations of reality. As Starkman explains, access journalism came to dominate business reporting in the 1990s, a process he calls “CNBCization,” and rather than examining risky, even corrupt, corporate behavior, mainstream reporters focused on profiling executives and informing investors. Starkman concludes with a critique of the digital-news ideology and corporate influence, which threaten to further undermine investigative reporting, and he shows how financial coverage, and journalism as a whole, can reclaim its bite. “Can stand as a potentially enduring case study of what went wrong and why.”—Alec Klein, national bestselling author of Aftermath “With detailed statistics, Starkman provides keen analysis of how the media failed in its mission at a crucial time for the U.S. economy.”—Booklist
Categories: Language Arts & Disciplines

Killing the Messenger

Killing the Messenger

The. BraSS. Check. UP TON SINCLAIR nce upon a time there was a little boy; a
nice little boy, whom you would have liked if you had known him—at least, so his
mother says. He had been brought up in the traditions of the old South, to which ...

Author: Tom Goldstein

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231118333

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 289

View: 963

An anthology of some of the most provocative writing that has been done in this century about the press, this volume includes articles by Walter Lippman, Clifton Daniel, John Hersey, Louis Brandeis, Upton Sinclair, and others.
Categories: Language Arts & Disciplines

100

100

" He used this line in speeches and the book about his campaign for governor as a way to explain why the editors and publishers of the major newspapers in California would not treat seriously his proposals for old age pensions and other ...

Author: Upton Sinclair

Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform

ISBN: 1973798301

Category:

Page: 250

View: 332

Prolific author and political activist Upton Sinclair throws the upheaval of the early twentieth century into sharp relief in 100%. In a matter of instants, a bomb blast transmutes Peter Gudge's entire existence into chaos, and in the resulting pandemonium, he's forced to reexamine all of his values and beliefs.Upton Sinclair (September 20, 1878 - November 25, 1968) was an American writer who wrote nearly one hundred books and other works in several genres. Sinclair's work was well-known and popular in the first half of the twentieth century, and he won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction in 1943.In 1906, Sinclair acquired particular fame for his classic muck-raking novel The Jungle, which exposed labor and sanitary conditions in the U.S. meat packing industry, causing a public uproar that contributed in part to the passage a few months later of the 1906 Pure Food and Drug Act and the Meat Inspection Act. In 1919, he published The Brass Check, a muck-raking expos� of American journalism that publicized the issue of yellow journalism and the limitations of the "free press" in the United States. Four years after publication of The Brass Check, the first code of ethics for journalists was created. Time magazine called him "a man with every gift except humor and silence". He is also well remembered for the line: "It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends upon his not understanding it." He used this line in speeches and the book about his campaign for governor as a way to explain why the editors and publishers of the major newspapers in California would not treat seriously his proposals for old age pensions and other progressive reforms.Many of his novels can be read as historical works. Writing during the Progressive Era, Sinclair describes the world of industrialized America from both the working man's point of view and the industrialist. Novels like King Coal (1917), The Coal War (published posthumously), Oil! (1927) and The Flivver King (1937) describe the working conditions of the coal, oil and auto industries at the time.
Categories:

Independent Intellectuals in the United States 1910 1945

Independent Intellectuals in the United States  1910 1945

Ludwig Lewisohn, on the staff of the Nation, remembered his “days of slavery” as
an instructor at Ohio State University but ... Commenting on Upton Sinclair's The
Brass Check, a scathing look at the popular American press, Eastman wrote: ...

Author: Steven Biel

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 9780814723449

Category: History

Page: 310

View: 647

A new intellectual community came together in the United States in the 1910s and 1920s, a community outside the universities, the professions and, in general, the established centers of intellectual life. A generation of young intellectuals was increasingly challenging both the genteel tradition and the growing division of intellectual labor. Adversarial and anti-professional, they exhibited a hostility to boundaries and specialization that compelled them toward an ambitious and self-conscious generalism and made them a force in the American political, literary, and artistic landscape. This book is a cultural history of this community of free-lance critics and an exploration of their collective effort to construct a viable public intellectual life in America. Steven Biel illustrates the diversity of the body of writings produced by these critics, whose subjects ranged from literature and fine arts to politics, economics, history, urban planning, and national character. Conceding that significant differences and conflicts did exist in the works of individual thinkers, Biel nonetheless maintains that a broader picture of this vibrant culture has been obscured by attempts to classify intellectuals according to political or ideological persuasions. His book brings to life the ways in which this community sought out alternative ways of making a living, devised strategies for reaching and engaging the public, debated the involvement of women in the intellectual community and incorporated Marxism into its evolving search for a decisive intellectual presence in American life. Examined in this lively study are the role and contributions of such figures as Randolph Bourne, Max Eastman, Crystal Eastman, Walter Lippmann, Margaret Sanger, Van Wyck Brooks, Floyd Dell, Edmund Wilson, Mable Dodge, Paul Rosenfeld, H. L. Mencken, Lewis Mumford, Malcolm Cowley, Matthew Josephson, John Reed, Waldo Frank, Gilbert Seldes, and Harold Stearns.
Categories: History

Eating History

Eating History

Thirty Turning Points in the Making of American Cuisine Andrew F. Smith. 17.
Upton Sinclair's Jungle 1. Upton Sinclair, The Brass Check: A Study of American
Journalism (Pasadena, Calif.: selfpublished, 1920), 32–49. 2. Ibid., 27. 3.

Author: Andrew F. Smith

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 9780231511759

Category: Cooking

Page: 392

View: 106

Food expert and celebrated food historian Andrew F. Smith recounts in delicious detail the creation of contemporary American cuisine. The diet of the modern American wasn't always as corporate, conglomerated, and corn-rich as it is today, and the style of American cooking, along with the ingredients that compose it, has never been fixed. With a cast of characters including bold inventors, savvy restaurateurs, ruthless advertisers, mad scientists, adventurous entrepreneurs, celebrity chefs, and relentless health nuts, Smith pins down the truly crackerjack history behind the way America eats. Smith's story opens with early America, an agriculturally independent nation where most citizens grew and consumed their own food. Over the next two hundred years, however, Americans would cultivate an entirely different approach to crops and consumption. Advances in food processing, transportation, regulation, nutrition, and science introduced highly complex and mechanized methods of production. The proliferation of cookbooks, cooking shows, and professionally designed kitchens made meals more commercially, politically, and culturally potent. To better understand these trends, Smith delves deeply and humorously into their creation. Ultimately he shows how, by revisiting this history, we can reclaim the independent, locally sustainable roots of American food.
Categories: Cooking

Endangered Dreams

Endangered Dreams

In The Moneychangers (1908), for example, he had castigated bankers and
banking. In The Profits of Religion (1918) he had indicted the clergy and
organized religion. In The Brass Check (1919) he gave the press forty whacks,
and in The ...

Author: Kevin Starr

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199923564

Category: History

Page: 432

View: 126

California, Wallace Stegner observed, is like the rest of the United States, only more so. Indeed, the Golden State has always seemed to be a place where the hopes and fears of the American dream have been played out in a bigger and bolder way. And no one has done more to capture this epic story than Kevin Starr, in his acclaimed series of gripping social and cultural histories. Now Starr carries his account into the 1930s, when the political extremes that threatened so much of the Depression-ravaged world--fascism and communism--loomed large across the California landscape. In Endangered Dreams, Starr paints a portrait that is both detailed and panoramic, offering a vivid look at the personalities and events that shaped a decade of explosive tension. He begins with the rise of radicalism on the Pacific Coast, which erupted when the Great Depression swept over California in the 1930s. Starr captures the triumphs and tumult of the great agricultural strikes in the Imperial Valley, the San Joaquin Valley, Stockton, and Salinas, identifying the crucial role played by Communist organizers; he also shows how, after some successes, the Communists disbanded their unions on direct orders of the Comintern in 1935. The highpoint of social conflict, however, was 1934, the year of the coastwide maritime strike, and here Starr's narrative talents are at their best, as he brings to life the astonishing general strike that took control of San Francisco, where workers led by charismatic longshoreman Harry Bridges mounted the barricades to stand off National Guardsmen. That same year socialist Upton Sinclair won the Democratic nomination for governor, and he launched his dramatic End Poverty in California (EPIC) campaign. In the end, however, these challenges galvanized the Right in a corporate, legal, and vigilante counterattack that crushed both organized labor and Sinclair. And yet, the Depression also brought out the finest in Californians: state Democrats fought for a local New Deal; California natives helped care for more than a million impoverished migrants through public and private programs; artists movingly documented the impact of the Depression; and an unprecedented program of public works (capped by the Golden Gate Bridge) made the California we know today possible. In capturing the powerful forces that swept the state during the 1930s--radicalism, repression, construction, and artistic expression--Starr weaves an insightful analysis into his narrative fabric. Out of a shattered decade of economic and social dislocation, he constructs a coherent whole and a mirror for understanding our own time.
Categories: History

Port Hazard

Port Hazard

We were alone in the foyer that opened into the saloon, but I didn't know for how
long. The auditorium door was drifting shut behind the last body to pass through. I
started to turn away, ... “I got a girl up at the Brass Check.” “Go see her. You've ...

Author: Loren D. Estleman

Publisher: Forge Books

ISBN: 9781429975391

Category: Fiction

Page: 304

View: 440

Page Murdock doesn’t know why someone wants him dead, but he knows where the hired killers are coming from. Thus begins Murdoch’s descent into a hell more decadent, corrupt, and dangerous than even he has ever seen—San Francisco’s Barbary Coast. With an unwilling backup man, Murdock takes up temporary residence among the whores, gamblers, dope addicts, and cutthroats of the continent’s foulest district. No man here is trustworthy. But perhaps the men who seem respectable are the most insidious of all. Port Hazard continues the Page Murdock saga from award-winning author Loren D. Estleman. At the Publisher's request, this title is being sold without Digital Rights Management Software (DRM) applied.
Categories: Fiction

The Millennium

The Millennium

rejected Sinclair on his failed aesthetic impact, Sinclair rejected the critics
because they failed to see his social impact. ... That his expose of newspapers,
The Brass Check, took its title from the metal token paid to prostitutes after
services ...

Author: Upton Sinclair

Publisher: Seven Stories Press

ISBN: 1583220216

Category: Fiction

Page: 196

View: 593

Introduction by Carl Jensen This facinating novel by one of America's best loved writers is set in New York in the year 2000 when capitalism finds its zenith with the building of The Pleasure Palace, a glittering half-mile structure in the middle of Central Park. At the opening an experiment goes badly wrong and an explosion kills everyone in the world save eleven of the people at The Pleasure Palace. They struggle to rebuild their lives by creating a new capitalistic society but soon find that to survive they will have to find a new way of life.
Categories: Fiction

The Crosswinds of Freedom 1932 1988

The Crosswinds of Freedom  1932   1988

independence when, in 1934, they trounced both major parties at the Wisconsin
polls. ... Sinclair had never stopped writing, protesting, and politicking since the
kindling days of The Jungle and The Brass Check, his famous muckraking works.

Author: James MacGregor Burns

Publisher: Open Road Media

ISBN: 9781453245200

Category: History

Page: 870

View: 802

A Pulitzer Prize winner’s “immensely readable” history of the United States from FDR’s election to the final days of the Cold War (Publishers Weekly). The Crosswinds of Freedom is an articulate and incisive examination of the United States during its rise to become the world’s sole superpower. Here is a young democracy transformed by the Great Depression, the Second World War, the Cold War, the rapid pace of technological change, and the distinct visions of nine presidents. Spanning fifty-six years and touching on many corners of the nation’s complex cultural tapestry, Burns’s work is a remarkable look at the forces that gave rise to the “American Century.”
Categories: History

The Book of Life

The Book of Life

Once upon a time I knew an Anarchist shoemaker, the same who had me sent to
jail for playing tennis on Sunday, as I have narrated in "The Brass Check." I
remember arguing with him concerning his ideas of sex, which were of the freest.

Author: Upton Sinclair

Publisher: Applewood Books

ISBN: 9781429014878

Category: Cooking

Page: 452

View: 641

Upton Sinclair, one of America's foremost and most prolific authors, addresses the cultivation of the mind and the body in this 1922 volume. Sinclair's goal was to attempt to tell the reader how to live, how to find health, happiness and success, and how to develop fully both the mind and the body. Part One: The Book of the Mind covers such subjects as faith, reason, morality, and the subconscious. Part Two: The Book of the Body develops such subjects as errors in diet, the fasting cure, food and poisons, work and play, and diseases and their cures .
Categories: Cooking

News for All the People

News for All the People

The Epic Story of Race and the American Media Juan Gonzalez, Joseph Torres
... Robert McChesney and Ben Scott's Introduction to Upton Sinclair, The Brass
Check:A Study ofAmericanJournalism (Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 2003).

Author: Juan Gonzalez

Publisher: Verso Books

ISBN: 9781844679423

Category: Social Science

Page: 456

View: 820

Here is a new, sweeping narrative history of American news media that puts race at the center of the story. From the earliest colonial newspapers to the Internet age, America’s racial divisions have played a central role in the creation of the country’s media system, just as the media has contributed to—and every so often, combated—racial oppression. News for All the People reveals how racial segregation distorted the information Americans received from the mainstream media. It unearths numerous examples of how publishers and broadcasters actually fomented racial violence and discrimination through their coverage. And it chronicles the influence federal media policies exerted in such conflicts. It depicts the struggle of Black, Latino, Asian, and Native American journalists who fought to create a vibrant yet little-known alternative, democratic press, and then, beginning in the 1970s, forced open the doors of the major media companies. The writing is fast-paced, story-driven, and replete with memorable portraits of individual journalists and media executives, both famous and obscure, heroes and villains. It weaves back and forth between the corporate and government leaders who built our segregated media system—such as Herbert Hoover, whose Federal Radio Commission eagerly awarded a license to a notorious Ku Klux Klan organization in the nation’s capital—and those who rebelled against that system, like Pittsburgh Courier publisher Robert L. Vann, who led a remarkable national campaign to get the black-face comedy Amos ’n’ Andy off the air. Based on years of original archival research and up-to-the-minute reporting and written by two veteran journalists and leading advocates for a more inclusive and democratic media system, News for All the People should become the standard history of American media.
Categories: Social Science

News for All the People The Epic Story of Race and the American Media

News for All the People  The Epic Story of Race and the American Media

Mott, AmericanJournalism: 519–45, provides an overview of the relentless Hearst
and Pulitzer campaigns in 1898 for war ... McChesney and Ben Scott's
Introduction to Upton Sinclair, The Brass Check:A Study ofAmericanJournalism (
Urbana: ...

Author: Juan González

Publisher: Verso Books

ISBN: 9781844676873

Category: Social Science

Page: 453

View: 122

Offers a sweeping account of the class and racial conflicts in the American news media, from the first colonial newspaper to the Internet age. By the co-author of Harvest of Empire.
Categories: Social Science

The Zinn Reader

The Zinn Reader

After reading The Brass Check, The Jungle, Oil, and several other books, I came
across one of his lesser-known novels, Boston, which was about the famous case
of Sacco and Vanzetti. I had already become interested in that extraordinary, ...

Author: Howard Zinn

Publisher: Seven Stories Press

ISBN: 1888363541

Category: Political Science

Page: 668

View: 163

Writings on Disobedience and Democracy A huge compendium of the writings of the US's most lauded radical historian whose 'A People's History of the United States' has gone into 25 printings and sold over 400,000 copies. What can I say that will in any way convey the love, respect, and admiration I feel for this unassuming hero who was my teacher and mentor, this radical historian and people-loving 'trouble maker', this man who stood with us and suffered with us.' - Alice Walker'
Categories: Political Science

Estimating Equilibrium Exchange Rates

Estimating Equilibrium Exchange Rates

The Historical Roots of the Revolution • 45 called yellow journalism, with its
emphasis on cartoons and drawings, liberal use of ... In his book The Brass
Check, Sinclair argued that newspapers weren't interested in principles or
crusades or the ...

Author: John Williamson

Publisher: Peterson Institute

ISBN: 0881320765

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 300

View: 920

The problems of exchange rate misalignments and the resulting payments imbalances have plagued the world economy for decades. At the Louvre Accord of 1987, the Group of Five industrial countries adopted a system of reference ranges for exchange rate management, influenced by proposals of C. Fred Bergstan and John Williamson for a target zone system. The reference range approach has, however, been operated only intermittently and half-heartedly, and questions continue to be raised in policy and scholarly circles about the design and operation of a full-fledged target zone regime. This volume, with chapters by leading international economists, explores one crucial issue in the design of a target zone system: the problem of calculating Williamson's concept of the fundamental equilibrium exchange rate (FEER). Williamson contributes an overview of the policy and analytic issues and a second chapter on his own calculations.
Categories: Business & Economics