Black Newspapers and America s War for Democracy 1914 1920

Black Newspapers and America s War for Democracy  1914 1920

... The Black Press in Mississippi, 1865-1985 fGainesville: University Press of Florida, 1993], 20), On the Mississippi black press, see ibid., 11-12.

Author: William G. Jordan

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 0807849367

Category: Social Science

Page: 241

View: 825

Studies the efforts of black newspapers to offer support and demonstrate patriotism during World War I, and demand the end to lynching, disfranchisement of blacks, and segregation as a condition for their participation in the war.
Categories: Social Science

Rooted in the Chants of Slaves Blacks in the Humanities 1985 1997

Rooted in the Chants of Slaves  Blacks in the Humanities  1985 1997

Thompson , Julius E. Black Press in Mississippi , 1865-1985 . Gainesville : University of Florida Press , 1993 . well - documented study , the history and ...

Author: Donald F. Joyce

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN: 0313304777

Category: Social Science

Page: 162

View: 126

Provides access to sources documenting Black achievements in the humanities.
Categories: Social Science

Black Life in Mississippi

Black Life in Mississippi

Washington , D. C .: NET Teacher Rights and Mississippi Teachers Association , 1973 . Thompson , Julius E. The Black Press In Mississippi , 1865-1985 : A ...

Author: Julius Eric Thompson

Publisher: University Press of America

ISBN: 0761819223

Category: History

Page: 298

View: 519

Black Life in Mississippi is a collection of essays which explore the underexposed life and culture of black Mississippians between the 1860's and the 1980's.
Categories: History

The Miami Times and the Fight for Equality

The Miami Times and the Fight for Equality

Julius E. Thompson, The Black Press in Mississippi, 1865-1985 (Gainesville, FL: University of Florida Press, 1993). 18. Shofner, “Florida,” 91. 19.

Author: Yanela G. McLeod

Publisher: Lexington Books

ISBN: 9781498576642

Category: History

Page: 198

View: 781

This book explores the civil rights activism of the Miami Times between 1948 and 1958 by highlighting its effort to help abolish the “Monday-only” policy that restricted black golfers to a single day of access to the Miami Springs Municipal Golf Course.
Categories: History

Aaron Henry of Mississippi

Aaron Henry of Mississippi

Black Faces in the Mirror: African Americans and Their Representatives in Congress. ... The Black Press in Mississippi, 18651985: A Directory.

Author: Minion K. C. Morrison

Publisher: University of Arkansas Press

ISBN: 9781557287595

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 363

View: 619

Winner of the 2016 Lillian Smith Book Award When Aaron Henry returned home to Mississippi from World War II service in 1946, he was part of wave of black servicemen who challenged the racial status quo. He became a pharmacist through the GI Bill, and as a prominent citizen, he organized a hometown chapter of the NAACP and relatively quickly became leader of the state chapter. From that launching pad he joined and helped lead an ensemble of activists who fundamentally challenged the system of segregation and the almost total exclusion of African Americans from the political structure. These efforts were most clearly evident in his leadership of the integrated Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party delegation, which, after an unsuccessful effort to unseat the lily-white Democratic delegation at the Democratic National Convention in 1964, won recognition from the national party in 1968. The man who the New York Times described as being “at the forefront of every significant boycott, sit-in, protest march, rally, voter registration drive and court case” eventually became a rare example of a social-movement leader who successfully moved into political office. Aaron Henry of Mississippi covers the life of this remarkable leader, from his humble beginnings in a sharecropping family to his election to the Mississippi house of representatives in 1979, all the while maintaining the social-change ideology that prompted him to improve his native state, and thereby the nation.
Categories: Biography & Autobiography

The Black Press in the Middle West 1865 1985

The Black Press in the Middle West  1865 1985

Also , as I traveled throughout the land , the concept of a black press in lowa and the Middle West was less acceptable than a black press in Mississippi ...

Author: Henry Lewis Suggs

Publisher: Greenwood

ISBN: UOM:39015037791962

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 410

View: 581

The first Black newspaper in America, Freedom's Journal appeared in 1827 and in its first editorial, it outlined an objective that is symbolic of the Black press in the Middle West: "We wish to plead our cause. Too long have others spoken for us." In this, the first comprehensive examination of the Black press in the Middle West, Suggs and his expert contributors rewrite the history of the Middle West and prove that Blacks were not only present, but that they helped to shape the history, character, and political agenda of the region.
Categories: Language Arts & Disciplines

The Grapevine of the Black South

The Grapevine of the Black South

In The Black Press in the South, 1865–1979, ed. ... Black Life in Mississippi: Essays on Political, Social and Cultural Studies in a Deep South State.

Author: Thomas Aiello

Publisher: University of Georgia Press

ISBN: 9780820354460

Category: History

Page: 310

View: 367

In the summer of 1928, William Alexander Scott began a small four-page weekly with the help of his brother Cornelius. In 1930 his Atlanta World became a semiweekly, and the following year W. A. began to implement his vision for a massive newspaper chain based out of Atlanta: the Southern Newspaper Syndicate, later dubbed the Scott Newspaper Syndicate. In April 1931 the World had become a triweekly, and its reach began drifting beyond the South. With The Grapevine of the Black South, Thomas Aiello offers the first critical history of this influential newspaper syndicate, from its roots in the 1930s through its end in the 1950s. At its heyday, more than 240 papers were associated with the Syndicate, making it one of the biggest organs of the black press during the period leading up to the classic civil rights era (1955-68). In the generation that followed, the Syndicate helped formalize knowledge among the African American population in the South. As the civil rights movement exploded throughout the region, black southerners found a collective identity in that struggle built on the commonality of the news and the subsequent interpretation of that news. Or as Gunnar Myrdal explained, the press was "the chief agency of group control. It [told] the individual how he should think and feel as an American Negro and create[d] a tremendous power of suggestion by implying that all other Negroes think and feel in this manner." It didn't create a complete homogeneity in black southern thinking, but it gave thinkers a similar set of tools from which to draw.
Categories: History

Journalism

Journalism

Thompson, Julius E. The Black Press in Mississippi 1865-1985: A Directory. West Cornwall, CT: Locust Hill Press, 1988. 144p. index. LC 88-561.

Author: Jo A. Cates

Publisher: Libraries Unlimited

ISBN: 1591580617

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 291

View: 560

A critically annotated bibliographic guide to print and electronic sources in print and broadcast journalism. This edition separates Commercial Databases and Internet Resources.
Categories: Language Arts & Disciplines

Lynchings in Mississippi

Lynchings in Mississippi

Julius E. Thompson, The Black Press in Mississippi, 18651985 (Gainesville, Fla.: The University Press of Florida, 1993), 59–60.

Author: Julius E. Thompson

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 9781476604251

Category: History

Page: 259

View: 578

Lynching occurred more in Mississippi than in any other state. During the 100 years after the Civil War, almost one in every ten lynchings in the United States took place in Mississippi. As in other Southern states, these brutal murders were carried out primarily by white mobs against black victims. The complicity of communities and courts ensured that few of the more than 500 lynchings in Mississippi resulted in criminal convictions. This book studies lynching in Mississippi from the Civil War through the civil rights movement. It examines how the crime unfolded in the state and assesses the large number of deaths, the reasons, the distribution by counties, cities and rural locations, and public responses to these crimes. The final chapter covers lynching’s legacy in the decades since 1965; an appendix offers a chronology.
Categories: History

Dudley Randall Broadside Press and the Black Arts Movement in Detroit 1960 1995

Dudley Randall  Broadside Press  and the Black Arts Movement in Detroit  1960 1995

Thompson , Julius E. The Black Press in Mississippi 1865-1985 : A Directory . West Cornwall , Conn .: Locust Hill Press , 1988 ...

Author: Julius E. Thompson

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 0786422645

Category: Social Science

Page: 352

View: 837

In 1965 Dudley F. Randall founded the Broadside Press, a company devoted to publishing, distributing and promoting the works of black poets and writers. In so doing, he became a major player in the civil rights movement. Hundreds of black writers were given an outlet for their work and for their calls for equality and black identity. Though Broadside was established on a minimal budget, Randall's unique skills made the press successful. He was trained as a librarian and had spent decades studying and writing poetry; most importantly, Randall was totally committed to the advancement of black literature. The famous and relatively unknown sought out Broadside, including such writers as Gwendolyn Brooks, Margaret Walker, Mae Jackson, Lance Jeffers, Etheridge Knight, Sonia Sanchez, Nikki Giovanni, Audre Lorde and Sterling D. Plumpp. His story is one of battling to promote black identity and equality through literature, and thus lifting the cultural lives of all Americans.
Categories: Social Science

The Press and Race

The Press and Race

(Jefferson: McFarland & Company, Inc., 1994). . The Black Press In Mississippi, 1865-1985. (Gainesville: University Press of Florida, 1993). . "Mississippi.

Author: David R. Davies

Publisher: Univ. Press of Mississippi

ISBN: 1934110523

Category: History

Page: 302

View: 101

Historians assess the fervent opinions and historic decisions of the Magnolia State's editorial writers in the tumultuous days of the Civil Rights Movement.
Categories: History

Encyclopedia of journalism 6 Appendices

Encyclopedia of journalism  6  Appendices

Thompson, Julius E. The Black Press in Mississippi, 18651985. Gainesville: University Press of Florida, 1993. Chronological discussion of black newspapers ...

Author: Christopher H. Sterling

Publisher: SAGE

ISBN: 9780761929574

Category: Journalism

Page: 2343

View: 543

"Written in a clear and accessible style that would suit the needs of journalists and scholars alike, this encyclopedia is highly recommended for large news organizations and all schools of journalism."--Starred Review, Library Journal Journalism permeates our lives and shapes our thoughts in ways we've long taken for granted. Whether we listen to National Public Radio in the morning, view the lead story on the Today show, read the morning newspaper headlines, stay up-to-the-minute with Internet news, browse grocery store tabloids, receive Time magazine in our mailbox, or watch the nightly.
Categories: Journalism

African Americans and the Media

African Americans and the Media

Journalism Quarterly 53: 199–203, 210. Thompson, Julius Eric. 1993. The Black Press in Mississippi, 18651985. Tampa: University Press of Florida.

Author: Catherine Squires

Publisher: Polity

ISBN: 9780745640341

Category: Social Science

Page: 301

View: 696

This work provides a textbook overview of the past, present, and future of African Americans in US media. It brings together work from a variety of disciplines to provide the fullest understanding of this complex relationship to date.
Categories: Social Science

Full Court Press

Full Court Press

Julius Eric Thompson, The Black Press in Mississippi, 18651985 (Gainesville: University Press of Florida, 1993), 64–66. 24. Ibid. 25.

Author: Jason A. Peterson

Publisher: Univ. Press of Mississippi

ISBN: 9781496808233

Category: Social Science

Page: 272

View: 517

During the civil rights era, Mississippi was caught in the hateful embrace of a white caste system that enforced segregation. Rather than troubling the Closed Society, state news media, on the whole, marched in lockstep or, worse, promoted the continued subservience of blacks. Surprisingly, challenges from Mississippi's college basketball courts questioned segregation's validity and its gentleman's agreement that prevented college teams in the Magnolia State from playing against integrated foes. Mississippi State University stood at the forefront of this battle for equality in the state with the school's successful college basketball program. From 1959 through 1963, the Maroons won four Southeastern Conference basketball championships and created a dynasty in the South's preeminent college athletic conference. However, in all four title-winning seasons, the press feverishly debated the merits of a National Collegiate Athletic Association appearance for the Maroons, culminating in Mississippi State University's participation in the integrated 1963 NCAA Championship. Full Court Press examines news articles, editorials, and columns published in Mississippi's newspapers during the eight-year existence of the gentleman's agreement that barred black participation, the challenges posed by Mississippi State University, and the subsequent integration of college basketball. While the majority of reporters opposed any effort to integrate, a segment of sports journalists, led by the charismatic Jimmie McDowell of the Jackson State Times, emerged as bold advocates for equality. Full Court Presshighlights an ideological metamorphosis within the press during the civil rights movement. The media, which had long minimized the struggle of blacks, slowly transformed into an industry that considered the plight of black Mississippians on equal footing with whites.
Categories: Social Science

Dark Journey

Dark Journey

Black Mississippians in the Age of Jim Crow Neil R. McMillen ... Julius E. Thomson , The Black Press in Mississippi , 1865-1985 : A Directory ( West ...

Author: Neil R. McMillen

Publisher: University of Illinois Press

ISBN: 025206156X

Category: Social Science

Page: 430

View: 594

"Remarkable for its relentless truth-telling, and the depth and thoroughness of its investigation, for the freshness of its sources, and for the shock power of its findings. Even a reader who is not unfamiliar with the sources and literature of the subject can be jolted by its impact."--C. Vann Woodward, New York Review of Books "Dark Journey is a superb piece of scholarship, a book that all students of southern and African-American history will find valuable and informative."--David J. Garrow, Georgia Historical Quarterly
Categories: Social Science

Remembering Dixie

Remembering Dixie

Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1976. Thompson, Julius Eric. The Black Press in Mississippi, 18651985. Gainesville: University Press of Florida, 1993.

Author: Susan T. Falck

Publisher: Univ. Press of Mississippi

ISBN: 9781496824431

Category: History

Page: 374

View: 370

Nearly seventy years after the Civil War, Natchez, Mississippi, sold itself to Depression-era tourists as a place “Where the Old South Still Lives.” Tourists flocked to view the town’s decaying antebellum mansions, hoopskirted hostesses, and a pageant saturated in sentimental Lost Cause imagery. In Remembering Dixie: The Battle to Control Historical Memory in Natchez, Mississippi, 1865–1941, Susan T. Falck analyzes how the highly biased, white historical memories of what had been a wealthy southern hub originated from the experiences and hardships of the Civil War. These collective narratives eventually culminated in a heritage tourism enterprise still in business today. Additionally, the book includes new research on the African American community’s robust efforts to build historical tradition, most notably, the ways in which African Americans in Natchez worked to create a distinctive postemancipation identity that challenged the dominant white structure. Using a wide range of late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century sources—many of which have never been fully mined before—Falck reveals the ways in which black and white Natchezians of all classes, male and female, embraced, reinterpreted, and contested Lost Cause ideology. These memory-making struggles resulted in emotional, internecine conflicts that shaped the cultural character of the community and impacted the national understanding of the Old South and the Confederacy as popular culture. Natchez remains relevant today as a microcosm for our nation’s modern-day struggles with Lost Cause ideology, Confederate monuments, racism, and white supremacy. Falck reveals how this remarkable story played out in one important southern community over several generations in vivid detail and richly illustrated analysis.
Categories: History

Encyclopedia of African American History 1896 to the Present J N

Encyclopedia of African American History  1896 to the Present  J N

As the black elite for whom back newspapers spoke moved more and more into white ... Thompson, Julius E. The Black Press in Mississippi, 18651985.

Author: Paul Finkelman

Publisher:

ISBN: 9780195167795

Category: African Americans

Page: 515

View: 230

Alphabetically-arranged entries from J to N that explores significant events, major persons, organizations, and political and social movements in African-American history from 1896 to the twenty-first-century.
Categories: African Americans

Partisans of the Southern Press

Partisans of the Southern Press

Greenwood, 1983), xi, 289, 294; Julius E. Thompson, The Black Press in Mississippi, 1865-1985 (Gainesville: The University Press of Florida, 1993), chap. 1.

Author: Carl R. Osthaus

Publisher: University Press of Kentucky

ISBN: 9780813194110

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 288

View: 922

Carl R. Osthaus examines the southern contribution to American Press history, from Thomas Ritchie's mastery of sectional politics and the New Orleans Picayune's popular voice and use of local color, to the emergence of progressive New South editors Henry Watterson, Francis Dawson, and Henry Grady, who imitated, as far as possible, the New Journalism of the 1880s. Unlike black and reform editors who spoke for minorities and the poor, the South's mainstream editors of the nineteenth century advanced the interests of the elite and helped create the myth of southern unity. The southern press diverged from national standards in the years of sectionalism, Civil War, and Reconstruction. Addicted to editorial diatribes rather than to news gathering, these southern editors of the middle period were violent, partisan, and vindictive. They exemplified and defended freedom of the press, but the South's press was free only because southern society was closed. This work broadens our understanding of journalism of the South, while making a valuable contribution to southern history.
Categories: Language Arts & Disciplines

What a Woman Ought to Be and to Do

What a Woman Ought to Be and to Do

... 1910— 1962 (Charlottesville: University Press of Virginia, 1988); Julius Thompson, The Black Press in Mississippi, 18651985 (Gainesville: University ...

Author: Stephanie J. Shaw

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226751306

Category: Political Science

Page: 364

View: 468

Stephanie J. Shaw takes us into the inner world of American black professional women during the Jim Crow era. This is a story of struggle and empowerment, of the strength of a group of women who worked against daunting odds to improve the world for themselves and their people. Shaw's remarkable research into the lives of social workers, librarians, nurses, and teachers from the 1870s through the 1950s allows us to hear these women's voices for the first time. The women tell us, in their own words, about their families, their values, their expectations. We learn of the forces and factors that made them exceptional, and of the choices and commitments that made them leaders in their communities. What a Woman Ought to Be and to Do brings to life a world in which African-American families, communities, and schools worked to encourage the self-confidence, individual initiative, and social responsibility of girls. Shaw shows us how, in a society that denied black women full professional status, these girls embraced and in turn defined an ideal of "socially responsible individualism" that balanced private and public sphere responsibilities. A collective portrait of character shaped in the toughest circumstances, this book is more than a study of the socialization of these women as children and the organization of their work as adults. It is also a study of leadership—of how African American communities gave their daughters the power to succeed in and change a hostile world.
Categories: Political Science