Youth and the New World

Youth and the New World

Author: Ralph Philip Boas

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ISBN: NYPL:33433069238420

Category: American essays

Page: 320

View: 576

Categories: American essays

The Atlantic Monthly

The Atlantic Monthly

Presents the online edition of "The Atlantic Monthly," a magazine devoted to politics, society, the arts, and culture.

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ISBN: OCLC:44309458

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View: 742

Presents the online edition of "The Atlantic Monthly," a magazine devoted to politics, society, the arts, and culture. Posts the contents of the current print edition, including articles in the departments of books, arts and leisure, reports, humor, fiction, and poetry. Includes past magazine issues, editor biographies, a site users guide, a FAQ section, and subscription information for the "TransAtlantic" free e-mail newsletter. Provides access to The Exchange online bookstore of "Atlantic" authors, the Agora page for feedback and letters-to-the-editor, and the home pages of site sponsor companies.
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The Atlantic Monthly Volume 2 Issue 12 October 1858

The Atlantic Monthly  Volume 2  Issue 12  October  1858

This edition of The Atlantic Monthly. Volume 2. Issue 12. October. 1858 i by Various is given by Ashed Phoenix - Million Book Edition

Author: Various

Publisher: Blurb

ISBN: 0368253619

Category:

Page: 116

View: 800

This edition of The Atlantic Monthly. Volume 2. Issue 12. October. 1858 i by Various is given by Ashed Phoenix - Million Book Edition
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The Atlantic Monthly

The Atlantic Monthly

' About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work.

Author:

Publisher: Forgotten Books

ISBN: 0656334789

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 876

View: 245

Excerpt from The Atlantic Monthly: January, 1919 I had but a brief spell Of good living. Mostly I lived miserably. And now I have risen. I have become an impor tant man. And I laugh at everything. I stopped believing in God while I was still a shepherd boy. I said, 'i do not believe; strike me!' There was a great thunderstorm; but He did not strike me. I never particularly cared for life, and did not particularly thank papa and mamma for the gift. But now that they need us for the war, they call us broth ers, ' and 'boys, ' and 'dear children.' About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.
Categories: Biography & Autobiography

The Atlantic Monthly

The Atlantic Monthly

I wish to record, as truthfully as I may, the beginnings of a momentous experiment, which, by proving the aptitude of the freed slaves for military drill and discipline, their ardent loyalty, their courage under fire, and their self-control ...

Author: Various

Publisher:

ISBN: 1409903036

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 216

View: 982

I wish to record, as truthfully as I may, the beginnings of a momentous experiment, which, by proving the aptitude of the freed slaves for military drill and discipline, their ardent loyalty, their courage under fire, and their self-control in success, contributed somewhat towards solving the problem of the war, and towards remoulding the destinies of two races on this continent.
Categories: Literary Collections

The Atlantic Monthly November 1857 Vol 1 No 1

The Atlantic Monthly November 1857  Vol 1  No 1

For over 160 years, the Atlantic monthly magazine has been a staple of American culture. This is the first ever Atlantic monthly magazine ever published.

Author: The Atlantic

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ISBN: 9798688844405

Category:

Page: 118

View: 576

For over 160 years, the Atlantic monthly magazine has been a staple of American culture. This is the first ever Atlantic monthly magazine ever published. Use it for reference, a conversation starter, or simply to enjoy the literature from long ago. There is something inside for everyone! This is the first in a series of republications of the Atlantic monthly magazine's oldest issues. We think making available in print and digital form these texts will help ensure their content exists in perpetuity and does not get left behind.
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The Atlantic Monthly Vol 28

The Atlantic Monthly  Vol  28

About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work.

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Publisher:

ISBN: 1331047889

Category:

Page: 784

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Excerpt from The Atlantic Monthly, Vol. 28: A Magazine of Literature, Science, Art, and Politics My Dear Fields: I have so long promised you a carving from a memory of twenty years ago, and you have so often kindly given me, as the mercantile phrase is, an extension, that I feel compelled to make leisure enough for myself to keep my word. I trust you will not be disappointed in your hope that it may interest the readers of the Atlantic. In the summer of 1849 Mr. Metcalf and I went into the Adirondacks, then but little known to tourists. Our journey up the valley of the Connecticut, across Vermont, and up Lake Champlain, full of beauties as it was, presented nothing that would be new to most readers. At Westport, near the head of Lake Champlain, on the New York side, we found a delightful colony of New England friends - a retired officer of the army, and two Boston gentlemen, one of leisure and one of business - planted in as charming a neighborhood as one need wish to live in, - the lake before them, the Green Mountain range across the lake, and the Adirondacks towering and stretching along the western horizon. At this time Westport had sprung into active life by means of an enterprise of Boston capitalists, who had set up iron-works there. All had an appearance of successful business. The houses of the workmen, and the other appurtenances and surroundings, were marked by a style which was but too pleasing to the fancy; yet they were the results of the application of wealth under good taste, and with a large view to the future. Changes of business or of tariffs or other causes have long ago brought all this to an end; and I suppose the little village has relapsed into its original state of torpor and insignificance. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.
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The Atlantic Monthly 1882 Vol 50

The Atlantic Monthly  1882  Vol  50

About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work.

Author:

Publisher: Forgotten Books

ISBN: 0332941116

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 884

View: 681

Excerpt from The Atlantic Monthly, 1882, Vol. 50: A Magazine of Literature, Science, Art, and Politics The strenuous wish to live and be hold the new phenomenon, supplanting the utter weariness of existence that he had heretofore experienced, lent him a new vitality. The crisis passed; there was a turn for the better; and after that he rapidly mended. The comet had in all probability saved his life. The limitless and complex wonders Of the sky resumed their Old power over his imagination; the possibilities of that unfathomable blue ocean were endless; finer feats than ever he would perform were to'be achieved in its investigation. What Lady Constantine had said, that for one discovery made ten awaited mak ing, was strikingly verified by the sud den appearance Of this splendid marvel. The windows of St. Cleeve's bed room faced the west, and nothing would satisfy him but that his bed should be so pulled round as to give him a view of the low sky, in which the as yet minute tadpole Of fire was recognizable. The mere sight of it seemed to lend him sufficient resolution to complete his own cure forthwith. His only fear now was lest, from some unexpected cause or other, the comet would vanish before he could get to the Observatory on Ring's Hill Speer. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.
Categories: Biography & Autobiography

The Atlantic Monthly Vol 41

The Atlantic Monthly  Vol  41

About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work.

Author:

Publisher: Forgotten Books

ISBN: 0483463825

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 820

View: 670

Excerpt from The Atlantic Monthly, Vol. 41: A Magazine of Literature, Science, Art, and Politics; January, 1878 This state of things continued till April. But the negroes were gradually yielding. The long-hoped for recog nition from Washington did not come. The depression of the times began to affect them. They had spent the earn ings of the previous year, and they had stolen all the property they dared. Hundreds were being thrown into jail to await trial at the courts, which meet but once in four months. Starvation was at their doors. The spring was com ing on, and they could secure no ad vances from the merchants to plant their crops; while the white farmers feared to enter into arrangements with laborers till they could see ahead. The Hamp ton government, also, with admirable management, gradually pushed the oppo sitiou to the wall. The courts and the tax payers were on its side: the former recognized its legitimacy, and the latter voluntarily contributed funds for its ex penses while the Chamberlain govern ment was adjudged illegal, and could raise no supplies. At length the whole machinery of the government was in the possession of the democracy. Its au thority was, indeed, denied by more than half the citizens, but its processes were everywhere enforced; while the author ity of the other faction obtained no where but within the granite walls of the state-house, which inclosed a garri son oi twenty-two soldiers of the United States. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.
Categories: Biography & Autobiography

The Atlantic Monthly Vol 5

The Atlantic Monthly  Vol  5

About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work.

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ISBN: 1331097045

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Page: 778

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Excerpt from The Atlantic Monthly, Vol. 5: A Magazine of Literature, Art, and Politics Antique, Art, beside affording a standard by which the modern may be measured, has the remarkable property - giving it a higher value - of testing the genuineness of the Art-impulse. Even to genius, that is, to the artist, a true Art-life is difficult of attainment. In the midst of illumination, there is the mystery: the subjective mystery, out of which issue the germs - like seeds floated from unknown shores - of his imaginings; the objective mystery, which yields to him, through obvious, yet unexplained harmonies, the means of manifestation. Behind the consciousness is the power; behind the power, that which gives it worth and occupation. To the artist definite foresight is denied. His life is full of surprises at new necessities. When the present demand shall have been fulfilled, what shall follow? Shall it be Madonna, or Laocoon? His errand is like that of the commander who bears sealed instructions; and he may drift for years, ere he knows wherefore. Thorwaldsen waited, wandering by the Tiber a thousand days, - then in one, uttered his immortal "Night." Not even the severest self-examination will enable one in whom the Art-impulse exists to understand thoroughly its aim and uses; yet to approximate a clear perception of his own nature and that of the art to which he is called is one of his first duties. What he is able to do, required to do, and permitted to do, are questions of vital importance. Possession of himself, of himself in the highest, will alone enable the student in Art to solve the difficulties of his position. His habitual consciousness must be made up of the noblest of all that has been revealed to it; otherwise those fine intuitions, akin to the ancient inspirations, through whose aid genius is informed of its privileges, are impossible. Therefore the foremost purpose of an artist should be to claim and take possession of self. Somewhere within is his inheritance, and he must not be hindered of it. Other men have other gifts, - gifts bestowed under different conditions, and subject in a great degree to choice. Talent is not fastidious. It is an instrumentality, and its aim is optional with him who possesses it. Genius is exquisitely fastidious, and the man whom it possesses must live its life, or no life. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.
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The Atlantic Monthly Vol 13

The Atlantic Monthly  Vol  13

About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work.

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN: 133133358X

Category:

Page: 792

View: 534

Excerpt from The Atlantic Monthly, Vol. 13: A Magazine of Literature, Art, and Politics Our magazine was introduced to the world bearing on the cover of its first number a vignette of the portraiture of the ever honored and revered John Winthrop, first Governor of the Colony of Massachusetts Bay. The effigies expressed a countenance, features, and a tone of character in beautiful harmony with all that we know of the man, all that he was and did. Gravity and loftiness of soul, tempered by a mild and tender delicacy, depth of experience, resolution of purpose, native dignity, acquired wisdom, and an harmonious equipoise of the robust virtues and the winning graces have set their unmistakable tokens on those lineaments. That vignette, after renewing from month to month before our readers, for nearly four years, as gracious and fragrant a memory as can engage the love of a New-England heart, gave place, in the month of June, 1861, to the only emblem, no longer personal, which might claim to supplant it. The national flag, during a struggle which has seen its dignity insulted only to rouse and nerve the spirit which shall vindicate its glory, has displaced that bearded and ruffed portraiture. The visitor to the Massachusetts State-House may see, hanging in its Senate-Chamber, tolerably well preserved on its canvas, what is believed, on trustworthy evidence, to be Vandyck's own painting of Winthrop. Another portrait of him - not so agreeable to the eye, nor so faithful, we are sure, to the original, yet reputed to date from the lifetime of its subject - hangs in the Hall of the American Antiquarian Society at Worcester. Those of our readers who have not lovingly pored and paused over Mr. Savage's elaborately illustrated edition of Governor Winthrop's Journal do not know what a profitable pleasure invites them, whenever they shall have grace to avail themselves of it. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.
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The Atlantic Monthly Vol 82

The Atlantic Monthly  Vol  82

About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work.

Author:

Publisher: Forgotten Books

ISBN: 1527645843

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 158

View: 554

Excerpt from The Atlantic Monthly, Vol. 82: A Magazine of Literature, Science, Art, and Politics; December, 1898 In government Holland has adopted toward Java an autocratic method, and under it the people have become pro sporous and contented. In Surinam a restricted system of representation exists, and the government has not compelled the people to work. The result has been that the negroes have retired into the forests, and given themselves up to devil worship, whilst the labor in the colony is done chiefly by imported East In dian laborers. Whatever might have been the condition of the Surinam no gro under autocratic government, he has proved himself, under a more liberal system, unsatisfactory as a colonist. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.
Categories: Biography & Autobiography

The Atlantic Monthly 1858 Vol 2

The Atlantic Monthly  1858  Vol  2

About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work.

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Publisher: Forgotten Books

ISBN: 1334913587

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Page: 912

View: 569

Excerpt from The Atlantic Monthly, 1858, Vol. 2: A Magazine of Literature, Art, and Politics Stimai gi'a che '1 mio saper misura Certa fosse e infallibile di quanto Puo far I' alto Faitor della natura. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.
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The Atlantic Monthly 1897 Vol 80

The Atlantic Monthly  1897  Vol  80

About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work.

Author:

Publisher: Forgotten Books

ISBN: 0483456055

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 874

View: 742

Excerpt from The Atlantic Monthly, 1897, Vol. 80: A Magazine of Literature, Science, Art, and Politics The making of our own nation seems to have taken place under our very eyes, so recent and so familiar is the story. The great process was worked out in the plain and Open day of the modern world, statesmen and historians standing by to superintend, criticise, make record of what was done. The stirring narrative runs quickly into the day in which we live; we can say that our grandfathers builded the government which now holds so large a place in the world; the story seems of yesterday, and yet seems en tire, as if the making of the republic had hastened to complete itself Within a single hundred years. We are elated to see so great a thing done upon so great a scale, and to feel ourselves in so inti mate a way actors in the moving scene. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.
Categories: Biography & Autobiography

The Atlantic Monthly 1882 Vol 49

The Atlantic Monthly  1882  Vol  49

About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work.

Author:

Publisher: Forgotten Books

ISBN: 1334906408

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 872

View: 943

Excerpt from The Atlantic Monthly, 1882, Vol. 49: A Magazine of Literature, Science, Art, and Politics Pay a fine of one dollar and costs, and stand committed to the House of Industry. He jotted something down on the back of each indictment, and half turned to toss it on to his desk, and then re sumed the catalogue of these offenders, accusing and dooming them all in the same weary and passionless monotone. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.
Categories: Biography & Autobiography

The Atlantic Monthly Vol 16

The Atlantic Monthly  Vol  16

Excerpt from The Atlantic Monthly, Vol. 16: A Magazine of Literature, Science, Art, and Politics; October, 1865 This story may be a pure fable, but the lesson it teaches is true and important.

Author: Caroline Wells Healey Dall

Publisher: Forgotten Books

ISBN: 1333401272

Category:

Page: 142

View: 650

Excerpt from The Atlantic Monthly, Vol. 16: A Magazine of Literature, Science, Art, and Politics; October, 1865 And who can fail to remember What superior resources a cultivated mind has over one sunk in Sloth and ignorance, - how much wider an outlook, how much larger and more varied interests, and how these things support when out ward props fail, how they strengthen in misfortune and pain, and keep the heart from anxieties which might wear out the body? Scott, dictating Ivanhoe in the midst of a torturing Sickness, and so rising, by force of a cultivated imagination, above all physical anguish, to revel in visions of chivalric Splendor, is but the type of men everywhere, who, but for resources supplied by the mind, would have sunk beneath the blows of adverse fortune, or else sought forget fulness in brutalizing and destructive pleasures. Sometimes a book is better far than medicine, and more truly sooth ing than the best anodyne. Sometimes a rich-freighted memory is more genial than many companions. Sometimes a firm mind, that has all it needs within itself, is a watchtower to which we may ee, and from which look down calmly upon our own losses and misfortunes. He who does not understand this has either had a most fortunate experience, or else has no culture, which is really a part of himself, woven into the very texture of the soul. So, if there were no facts, considering the mind, and who made it, and how it is related to the body, and how, when it is a good mind and a well-stored mind, it seems to stand for all else, to be food and Shelter and comfort and friend and hope, who could believe anything else than that a well-instructed soul could do nought but good to its servant the body? About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works."
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The Atlantic Monthly 1893 Vol 72

The Atlantic Monthly  1893  Vol  72

About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work.

Author:

Publisher: Forgotten Books

ISBN: 1334989370

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 870

View: 210

Excerpt from The Atlantic Monthly, 1893, Vol. 72: A Magazine of Literature, Science, And, and Politics Nevertheless he was relieved to be free of their presence. He felt that it was well that their legitimate business one as a stock broker, the other a real estate agent held them to their desks in the city of Bretonville. The mani fest purpose of their creation, he thought, was fully served in their furnishing forth their quota of the sinews of war. He was much younger than either, but he had learned something beyond their knowledge in this internecine strife, and when it became necessary to provide for them occupation, to prevent further in terference in the venture which had come to be of most hopeful interest to both, he wrote to them touching the finding of a suitable man to keep the hotel when built, certain that in this quest for a Boniface he had set them by the ears, and relying on their different temperaments to keep them wrangling together and to leave him in peace. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works."
Categories: Biography & Autobiography