American Women in Transition

American Women in Transition

25Waite and Spitze, "Young Women's Transition to Marriage.” 26Kingsley Davis, “The American Family in Relation to Demographic Change," in Charles F. Westoff and Robert Parke, eds., Demographic and Social Aspects of Population Growth, ...

Author: Suzanne M. Bianchi

Publisher: Russell Sage Foundation

ISBN: 9781610440530

Category: Social Science

Page: 312

View: 931

This is the first in a series of eighteen projected volumes, to be published over the next two years, aimed at converting the vast statistical yield of the 1980 Census into authoritative analyses of major changes and trends in American life. A collaborative research effort, funded by public and private foundations, this series revives a tradition of independent Census analysis (the last such project was undertaken in 1960) and offers an unparalleled array of studies on various ethnic, geographic, and status dimensions of the U.S. population. It is entirely appropriate that the inaugural volume in this series should document trends in the status of American women. Dramatic social and demographic changes over the past two decades make American Women in Transition a landmark, an invaluable one-volume summary and assessment of women's move from the private domain to the public. Clearly and in detail, the authors describe women's increasing educational attainment and labor force participation, their lagging earning power, their continued commitment to marriage and family, and the "balancing act" necessitated by this overlap of roles. Supplementing 1980 Census data with even more recent surveys from the Census Bureau and other federal agencies, Bianchi and Spain are able to extend these trends into the 1980s and sketch the complex challenges posed by such lasting and historic changes. This definitive and sensitive study is certain to become a standard reference work on American women today, and an essential foundation for future scholarship and policy concerning the status of women in our society. A Volume in the Russell Sage Foundation Census Series
Categories: Social Science

American Women in Transition

American Women in Transition

This is the first in a series of eighteen projected volumes, to be published over the next two years, aimed at converting the vast statistical yield of the 1980 Census into authoritative analyses of major changes and trends in American life ...

Author: Suzanne M. Bianchi

Publisher: Russell Sage Foundation

ISBN: 0871541114

Category: Social Science

Page: 312

View: 170

This is the first in a series of eighteen projected volumes, to be published over the next two years, aimed at converting the vast statistical yield of the 1980 Census into authoritative analyses of major changes and trends in American life. A collaborative research effort, funded by public and private foundations, this series revives a tradition of independent Census analysis (the last such project was undertaken in 1960) and offers an unparalleled array of studies on various ethnic, geographic, and status dimensions of the U.S. population. It is entirely appropriate that the inaugural volume in this series should document trends in the status of American women. Dramatic social and demographic changes over the past two decades make American Women in Transition a landmark, an invaluable one-volume summary and assessment of women's move from the private domain to the public. Clearly and in detail, the authors describe women's increasing educational attainment and labor force participation, their lagging earning power, their continued commitment to marriage and family, and the "balancing act" necessitated by this overlap of roles. Supplementing 1980 Census data with even more recent surveys from the Census Bureau and other federal agencies, Bianchi and Spain are able to extend these trends into the 1980s and sketch the complex challenges posed by such lasting and historic changes. This definitive and sensitive study is certain to become a standard reference work on American women today, and an essential foundation for future scholarship and policy concerning the status of women in our society. A Volume in the Russell Sage Foundation Census Series
Categories: Social Science

The American Woman in Transition

The American Woman in Transition

This is a must-have book for all fans of Led Zeppelin and the immortal drum work of the legendary John Bonham.

Author: Margaret Gibbons Wilson

Publisher: Westport, Conn. : Greenwood Press

ISBN: UVA:X000015399

Category: Social Science

Page: 252

View: 346

This is a must-have book for all fans of Led Zeppelin and the immortal drum work of the legendary John Bonham. Titles: Achilles Last Stand * All My Love * Babe I'm Gonna Leave You * Black Dog * Communication Breakdown * Dazed and Confused * D'yer Mak'er * Good Times Bad Times * Heartbreaker * Houses of the Holy * Immigrant Song * In the Evening * Kashmir * No Quarter * Nobody's Fault but Mine * Over the Hills and Far Away * Ramble On * Rock and Roll * Since I've Been Loving You * Stairway to Heaven * The Song Remains the Same * Trampled Under Foot * When the Levee Breaks * Whole Lotta Love.
Categories: Social Science

Melodrama and Modernity

Melodrama and Modernity

... Women in Gainful Occupation , 1870–1920 , 23 ; both are cited in Elyce Rotella , From Home to Office : U.S. Women at ... Place in the American Economy Since 1869 , 148–49 , cited in Wilson , The American Woman in Transition , 174.

Author: Ben Singer

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231505078

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 256

View: 600

In this groundbreaking investigation into the nature and meanings of melodrama in American culture between 1880 and 1920, Ben Singer offers a challenging new reevaluation of early American cinema and the era that spawned it. Singer looks back to the sensational or "blood and thunder" melodramas (e.g., The Perils of Pauline, The Hazards of Helen, etc.) and uncovers a fundamentally modern cultural expression, one reflecting spectacular transformations in the sensory environment of the metropolis, in the experience of capitalism, in the popular imagination of gender, and in the exploitation of the thrill in popular amusement. Written with verve and panache, and illustrated with 100 striking photos and drawings, Singer's study provides an invaluable historical and conceptual map both of melodrama as a genre on stage and screen and of modernity as a pivotal idea in social theory.
Categories: Performing Arts

American Studies

American Studies

The American Short Story : A Critical Survey L 35 American Short Story : Front Line in the National Defense of ... 1720-1920 A - A 160 The American Waman H 717 The American Woman in Sport PC 944 The American Woman in Transition H 838 ...

Author: Jack Salzman

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521266882

Category: Art

Page: 2058

View: 234

This is an annotated bibliography of 20th century books through 1983, and is a reworking of American Studies: An Annotated Bibliography of Works on the Civilization of the United States, published in 1982. Seeking to provide foreign nationals with a comprehensive and authoritative list of sources of information concerning America, it focuses on books that have an important cultural framework, and does not include those which are primarily theoretical or methodological. It is organized in 11 sections: anthropology and folklore; art and architecture; history; literature; music; political science; popular culture; psychology; religion; science/technology/medicine; and sociology. Each section contains a preface introducing the reader to basic bibliographic resources in that discipline and paragraph-length, non-evaluative annotations. Includes author, title, and subject indexes. ISBN 0-521-32555-2 (set) : $150.00.
Categories: Art

Mothers and Such

Mothers and Such

122 ; Mohr , Abortion in America , pp . 230 , 242-243 ; Gordon , Woman's Body , Woman's Right , p . 167 ; Margaret Gibbons Wilson , The American Woman in Transition : The Urban Influence , 1870-1920 ( Westport , Conn . , 1979 ) , p .

Author: Maxine L. Margolis

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520055969

Category: Social Science

Page: 360

View: 966

Why was motherhood barely mentioned as a discrete role in eighteenth-century sermons? And why, beginning in the 1830s, did it become the foucs of attention in domestic manuals and other forms of popular literature addressed to middle-class women? Maxine L. Margolis examines these and other questions about the changing roles of middle-class women. Her conclusion is that "we have come to think of as inevitable and biologically necessary is in great measure a consequence of our society's particularly social and economic system." She cites the influence of such variables as household versus industrial production, a manufacturing versus a service-oriented economy, the demand or lack of demand for women's labor, the economy's need for "high quality" employees, and the changing costs and benefits of rearing the middle-class children who would become those employees. This convincing analysis asserts that there are well-defined material cuases for ceontempoary attutides toward women and work, for new ideas about child rearing, for the changing nature of housework, and for the revival of feminism.
Categories: Social Science

Changing Woman

Changing Woman

Lindborg and Ovando, Five Mexican-American Women in Transition, 68-83. 48. Ibid., 68. 49. Ibid., 66-68; Nan Elsasser, Kyle MacKenzie, and Yvonne Tixier y Vigil, eds., Las Mujeres: Conversations from a Hispanic Community (Old Westbury, ...

Author: Karen Anderson

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0198022131

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 714

While great strides have been made in documenting discrimination against women in America, our awareness of discrimination is due in large part to the efforts of a feminist movement dominated by middle-class white women, and is skewed to their experiences. Yet discrimination against racial ethnic women is in fact dramatically different--more complex and more widespread--and without a window into the lives of racial ethnic women our understanding of the full extent of discrimination against all women in America will be woefully inadequate. Now, in this illuminating volume, Karen Anderson offers the first book to examine the lives of women in the three main ethnic groups in the United States--Native American, Mexican American, and African American women--revealing the many ways in which these groups have suffered oppression, and the profound effects it has had on their lives. Here is a thought-provoking examination of the history of racial ethnic women, one which provides not only insight into their lives, but also a broader perception of the history, politics, and culture of the United States. For instance, Anderson examines the clash between Native American tribes and the U.S. government (particularly in the plains and in the West) and shows how the forced acculturation of Indian women caused the abandonment of traditional cultural values and roles (in many tribes, women held positions of power which they had to relinquish), subordination to and economic dependence on their husbands, and the loss of meaningful authority over their children. Ultimately, Indian women were forced into the labor market, the extended family was destroyed, and tribes were dispersed from the reservation and into the mainstream--all of which dramatically altered the woman's place in white society and within their own tribes. The book examines Mexican-American women, revealing that since U.S. job recruiters in Mexico have historically focused mostly on low-wage male workers, Mexicans have constituted a disproportionate number of the illegals entering the states, placing them in a highly vulnerable position. And even though Mexican-American women have in many instances achieved a measure of economic success, in their families they are still subject to constraints on their social and political autonomy at the hands of their husbands. And finally, Anderson cites a wealth of evidence to demonstrate that, in the years since World War II, African-American women have experienced dramatic changes in their social positions and political roles, and that the migration to large urban areas in the North simply heightened the conflict between homemaker and breadwinner already thrust upon them. Changing Woman provides the first history of women within each racial ethnic group, tracing the meager progress they have made right up to the present. Indeed, Anderson concludes that while white middle-class women have made strides toward liberation from male domination, women of color have not yet found, in feminism, any political remedy to their problems.
Categories: History

Mothers and Daughters in Nineteenth Century America

Mothers and Daughters in Nineteenth Century America

“Family History and Demographic Transition.” In The American Family in Social-Historical Perspective, Edited Michael Gordon. New York: St. Martin's Press, 1973, 516–32. ———. “Women's Lives Transformed: Demographic and Family Patterns in ...

Author: Nancy M. Theriot

Publisher: University Press of Kentucky

ISBN: 9780813183077

Category: Social Science

Page: 240

View: 399

The feminine script of early nineteenth century centered on women's role as patient, long-suffering mothers. By mid-century, however, their daughters faced a world very different in social and economic options and in the physical experiences surrounding their bodies. In this groundbreaking study, Nancy Theriot turns to social and medical history, developmental psychology, and feminist theory to explain the fundamental shift in women's concepts of femininity and gender identity during the course of the century -- from an ideal suffering womanhood to emphasis on female control of physical self. Theriot's first chapter proposes a methodological shift that expands the interdisciplinary horizons of women's history. She argues that social psychological theories, recent work in literary criticism, and new philosophical work on subjectivities can provide helpful lenses for viewing mothers and children and for connecting socioeconomic change and ideological change. She recommends that women's historians take bolder steps to historicize the female body by making use of the theoretical insights of feminist philosophers, literary critics, and anthropologists. Within this methodological perspective, Theriot reads medical texts and woman- authored advice literature and autobiographies. She relates the early nineteenth-century notion of "true womanhood" to the socioeconomic and somatic realities of middle-class women's lives, particularly to their experience of the new male obstetrics. The generation of women born early in the century, in a close mother/daughter world, taught theirdaughters the feminine script by word and action. Their daughters, however, the first generation to benefit greatly from professional medicine, had less reason than their mothers to associate womanhood with pain and suffering. The new concept of femininity they created incorporated maternal teaching but altered it to make meaningful their own very different experience. This provocative study applies interdisciplinary methodology to new and long-standing questions in women's history and invites women's historians to explore alternative explanatory frameworks.
Categories: Social Science