Tending the Wild

Native American Knowledge and the Management of California's Natural Resources

Author: Kat Anderson

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520248519

Category: Nature

Page: 526

View: 5330

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Demonstrates how Native American knowledge and uses of California's natural resources can contribute to contemporary conservation efforts, exploring the land management practices that Native Americans recall from their grandparents, such as how and when areas were burned, which plants were eaten and which were used for basketry, and how plants were tended. Original.
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Recognition, Sovereignty Struggles, and Indigenous Rights in the United States

A Sourcebook

Author: Amy E. Den Ouden,Jean M. O'Brien

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 1469602172

Category: Social Science

Page: 376

View: 6023

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This engaging collection surveys and clarifies the complex issue of federal and state recognition for Native American tribal nations in the United States. Den Ouden and O'Brien gather focused and teachable essays on key topics, debates, and case studies. Written by leading scholars in the field, including historians, anthropologists, legal scholars, and political scientists, the essays cover the history of recognition, focus on recent legal and cultural processes, and examine contemporary recognition struggles nationwide. Contributors are Joanne Barker (Lenape), Kathleen A. Brown-Perez (Brothertown), Rosemary Cambra (Muwekma Ohlone), Amy E. Den Ouden, Timothy Q. Evans (Haliwa-Saponi), Les W. Field, Angela A. Gonzales (Hopi), Rae Gould (Nipmuc), J. Kehaulani Kauanui (Kanaka Maoli), K. Alexa Koenig, Alan Leventhal, Malinda Maynor Lowery (Lumbee), Jean M. O'Brien (White Earth Ojibwe), John Robinson, Jonathan Stein, Ruth Garby Torres (Schaghticoke), and David E. Wilkins (Lumbee).
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Edible Forest Gardens, Volume II

Ecological Design And Practice for Temperate-Climate Permaculture

Author: Dave Jacke,Eric Toensmeier

Publisher: Chelsea Green Publishing

ISBN: 1931498806

Category: Gardening

Page: 654

View: 703

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Edible Forest Gardens is a groundbreaking two-volume work that spells out and explores the key concepts of forest ecology and applies them to the needs of natural gardeners in temperate climates. In Volume II, Dave Jacke and Eric Toensmeier take the vision of the forest garden and basic ecological principles from Vol. I and move on to practical considerations: concrete ways to design, establish, and maintain your own forest garden. Along the way they present case studies and examples, as well as tables, illustrations, and a uniquely valuable "plant matrix" that lists hundreds of the best edible and useful species.
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Edible Forest Gardens, Volume I

Ecological Vision, Theory for Temperate Climate Permaculture

Author: Dave Jacke,Eric Toensmeier

Publisher: Chelsea Green Publishing

ISBN: 1931498792

Category: Gardening

Page: 378

View: 8393

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Edible Forest Gardens is a groundbreaking two-volume work that spells out and explores the key concepts of forest ecology and applies them to the needs of natural gardeners in temperate climates. Volume I lays out the vision of the forest garden and explains the basic ecological principles that make it work. Edible Forest Gardens offer an advanced course in ecological gardening--one that will forever change the way you look at plants and your environment.
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River City and Valley Life

An Environmental History of the Sacramento Region

Author: Christopher J. Castaneda,Lee M. A. Simpson

Publisher: University of Pittsburgh Press

ISBN: 0822979187

Category: History

Page: 416

View: 8313

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Often referred to as “the Big Tomato,” Sacramento is a city whose makeup is significantly more complex than its agriculture-based sobriquet implies. In River City and Valley Life, seventeen contributors reveal the major transformations to the natural and built environment that have shaped Sacramento and its suburbs, residents, politics, and economics throughout its history. The site that would become Sacramento was settled in 1839, when Johann Augustus Sutter attempted to convert his Mexican land grant into New Helvetia (or “New Switzerland”). It was at Sutter’s sawmill fifty miles to the east that gold was first discovered, leading to the California Gold Rush of 1849. Nearly overnight, Sacramento became a boomtown, and cityhood followed in 1850. Ideally situated at the confluence of the American and Sacramento Rivers, the city was connected by waterway to San Francisco and the surrounding region. Combined with the area’s warm and sunny climate, the rivers provided the necessary water supply for agriculture to flourish. The devastation wrought by floods and cholera, however, took a huge toll on early populations and led to the construction of an extensive levee system that raised the downtown street level to combat flooding. Great fortune came when local entrepreneurs built the Central Pacific Railroad, and in 1869 it connected with the Union Pacific Railroad to form the first transcontinental passage. Sacramento soon became an industrial hub and major food-processing center. By 1879, it was named the state capital and seat of government. In the twentieth century, the Sacramento area benefitted from the federal government’s major investment in the construction and operation of three military bases and other regional public works projects. Rapid suburbanization followed along with the building of highways, bridges, schools, parks, hydroelectric dams, and the Rancho Seco nuclear power plant, which activists would later shut down. Today, several tribal gaming resorts attract patrons to the area, while “Old Sacramento” revitalizes the original downtown as it celebrates Sacramento’s pioneering past. This environmental history of Sacramento provides a compelling case study of urban and suburban development in California and the American West. As the contributors show, Sacramento has seen its landscape both ravaged and reborn. As blighted areas, rail yards, and riverfronts have been reclaimed, and parks and green spaces created and expanded, Sacramento’s identity continues to evolve. As it moves beyond its Gold Rush, Transcontinental Railroad, and government-town heritage, Sacramento remains a city and region deeply rooted in its natural environment.
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Trees in Paradise: A California History

Author: Jared Farmer

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 0393078027

Category: History

Page: 552

View: 8602

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Traces the history of such iconic Californian vegetation as orange trees, giant redwoods, and palm trees, including the impact the vegetation had on the people living and working in the state.
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