A Tale of Two Cities

Global Change, Local Feeling, and Everyday Life in the North of England : a Study in Manchester and Sheffield

Author: Ian R. Taylor,Karen Evans,Penny Fraser

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 0415138299

Category: Social Science

Page: 391

View: 6140

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The city of the future is to be found not just in the post-modern metropolis but also in the once great industrial cities, from the rust belt of the United States to the centres of the English industrial revolution. This is a study of two such cities - Manchester and Sheffield.
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A Tale Of Two Cities

Global Change, Local Feeling and Everday Life in the North of England

Author: Karen Evans,Penny Fraser,Ian Taylor

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9780203437537

Category: Social Science

Page: 416

View: 2766

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"A Tale of Two Cities" is a study of two major cities, Manchester and Sheffield. Drawing on the work of major theorists, the authors explore the everyday life, making contributions to our understanding of the defining activities of life.
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Function-Based Spatiality and the Development of Korean Communities in Japan

A Complex Adaptive Systems Theory Approach

Author: David Rands

Publisher: Lexington Books

ISBN: 0739173693

Category: Social Science

Page: 206

View: 8260

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Function-Based Spatiality and the Development of Korean Communities in Japan addresses the impact of urban environments on the development of Korean communities in Japan. It takes into consideration the historically developed functions of the cities in their regional, national, and international spheres and shows the relevance of those functions to the Korean communities of each city. This book will be of interest not only to scholars of the Korean minority of Japan but also to all who study the relationships between spatial functions and immigration.
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Crime In Context

Author: Ian Taylor

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 0429721706

Category: Social Science

Page: 304

View: 2745

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At the end of the twentieth century, the bookstores are full of books on crime, though this title will certainly not find a place on the same shelves. In the massive Waterstones bookstore in the city of Manchester, England, where I lived through most of the 1990s, the ground floor display area was rearranged in 1995 so as to accommodate, right at the front of the store, several hundred new titles, on topics like Serial Murderers and Sexual Crimes of the Twentieth Century.l Several of these new books are companion volumes to movies on release in the city's cinemas or, in some instances, are simply the original text on which the movies are based. The movies in question - Shallow Grave, Silence of the Lambs, Reservoir Dogs, Natural Born Killers and others - focus heavily on interpersonal violence and murder and also place great emphasis in the manner of many earlier cinematic genres - on the idea of the 'criminal mind' (not least, as a way of dramatizing the detection of the originating criminal act) but also - to a significant extent, these are movies which emphasize the idea and contemporary social presence of evil. Similar moral and psychologistic preoccupations are now also widely apparent on primetime television - most notably, in Britain, in the extraordinarily powerful Cracker series, produced by Granada Television in 1994 and 1995, watched by over 15 million people, and featuring, inter alia, the forensic investigation' of serial and sexual murders, some of them extremely graphically displayed (Crace 1994).2 The prominence of 'Gothic' themes in movies about violent death is not new in itself: there is a long history of interest in the cinema in horror and, indeed, in 'transgression' and evil. What may be definitive about the present genre of movies as well as the range of fictional and non-fictional titles in the bookstores about crime is the overwhelming focus on murder and killing represented in very contemporary and mundane, ordinary and, indeed, 'respectable' settings, and the powerful suggestion that these movies are a representation of the risks and dangers involved in everyday life at the end of the twentieth century. The bookstore display in Waterstones is straightforwardly called the 'Real Crimes' section.
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