Syntactic Change in Medieval French

Syntactic Change in Medieval French

The work of Vanelli, Renzi and Beninca (1985) (along with many other works by these authors individually) shows that a number of other geographically proximate medieval dialects had similar systems, though it appears that there are ...

Author: Barbara S. Vance

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9789401588430

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 402

View: 694

1. 0. V2 AND NULL SUBJECTS IN THE HIS TORY OF FRENCH The prototypical Romance null subject language has certain well known characteristics: verbal inflection is rich, distinguishing six per sonlnumber forms; subject pronouns are generally emphatic; and, when there is no need to emphasize the subject, the pronoun is not expressed at all. Spanish and Italian, for example, fit this description rather weIl. Modem French, however, provides a striking contrast to these lan guages; it does not allow subjects to be missing and, not unexpectedly, it has a verbal agreement system with few overt endings and subject pronouns which are not emphatic. One of the goals of the present work is to examine null subjects in two dialects of Romance that fit neither the Italian nor the French model: later Old French (12th-13th centriries) and MiddIe French (14th- 15th centuries). Old French has null subjects only in contexts where the subject would be postverbal if expressed (cf. Foulet (1928)), and Mid dIe French has null subjects in a wider range of syntactic contexts but does not freely allow a11 persons of the verb to be null. The work of Vanelli, Renzi and Beninca (1985) (along with many other works by these authors individually) shows that a number of other geographically proximate medieval dialects had similar systems, though it appears that there are significant differences in detail among them.
Categories: Language Arts & Disciplines

Syntactic Change in French

Syntactic Change in French

Parameters and effects of word order variation. Cambridge, MA: Massachusetts Institute of Technology PhD dissertation. Troberg, Michelle. 2004. Topic-comment resumptive pronouns in Modern French and Old and Middle French.

Author: Sam Wolfe

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780198864318

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 336

View: 120

This book provides the most comprehensive and detailed formal account to date of the evolution of French syntax. It covers syntactic variation and change across all periods of French, and in standard and non-standard varieties, and explores phenomena such as subject positions and null subjects, verb movement, object placement, and negation.
Categories: Language Arts & Disciplines

Syntactic Change

Syntactic Change

'Early medieval Greek hina', Glotta 38:312–313. Tsangalidis, A. 1999. ... 'Null subjects and syntactic change in Medieval French', PhD thesis, Cornell Univesity. 1997. Syntactic Change in Medieval French: Verb Second and Null Subjects, ...

Author: Ian Roberts

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781139435512

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page:

View: 945

The phenomenon of grammaticalization - the historical process whereby new grammatical material is created - has attracted a great deal of attention within linguistics. This is an attempt to provide a general account of this phenomenon in terms of a formal theory of syntax. Using Chomsky's Minimalist Program for linguistic theory, Roberts and Roussou show how this approach gives rise to a number of important conceptual and theoretical issues concerning the nature of functional categories and the form of parameters, as well as the relation of both of these to language change. Drawing on examples from a wide range of languages, they construct a general account of grammaticalization with implications for linguistic theory and language acquisition.
Categories: Language Arts & Disciplines

Information Structure and Syntactic Change in Germanic and Romance Languages

Information Structure and Syntactic Change in Germanic and Romance Languages

Topics and the left periphery: A comparison of Old French and Modern Germanic. In In Search ofUniversal Grammar: From Old Norse to ... The interaction of syntactic change and information status in the change from OV to VO in English.

Author: Kristin Bech

Publisher: John Benjamins Publishing Company

ISBN: 9789027270467

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 421

View: 249

The contributions of this volume offer new perspectives on the relation between syntax and information structure in the history of Germanic and Romance languages, focusing on English, German, Norwegian, French, Spanish and Portuguese, and both from a synchronic and a diachronic perspective. In addition to discussing changes in individual languages along the syntax–information structure axis, the volume also makes a point of comparing and contrasting different languages with respect to the interplay between syntax and information structure. Since the creation of increasingly sophisticated annotated corpora of historical texts is on the agenda in many research environments, methods and schemes for information structure annotation and analysis of historical texts from a theoretical and applied perspective are discussed.
Categories: Language Arts & Disciplines

Quantitative Approaches to Grammar and Grammatical Change

Quantitative Approaches to Grammar and Grammatical Change

Rinke, Esther; Meisel, Jürgen: Subject-inversion in Old French: Syntax and information structure. In: Kaiser, Georg & Remberger, Eva-Maria (ed.): Proceedings of the Workshop 'Null-subjects, expletives, and locatives in Romance'.

Author: Sam Featherston

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG

ISBN: 9783110401929

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 240

View: 629

The newly-emerging field of theoretically informed but simultaneously empirically based syntax is dynamic but little-represented in the literature. This volume addresses this need. While there has previously been something of a gulf between theoretical linguists in the generative tradition and those linguists who work with quantitative data types, this gap is narrowing. In the light of the empirical revolution in the study of syntax, even people whose primary concern is grammatical theory take note of processing effects and attribute certain effects to them. Correspondingly, workers focusing on the surface evidence can relate more to the concepts of the theoreticians, because the two layers of explanation have been brought into contact. And these workers too must account for the data gathered by the theoreticians. An additional innovation is the generative analysis of historical data – this is now seen as psycholinguistic theory-relevant data like any other. These papers are thus a snapshot of some of the work currently being done in evidence-based grammar, using both experimental and historical data.
Categories: Language Arts & Disciplines

Internal and External Factors in Syntactic Change

Internal and External Factors in Syntactic Change

The analysis presented in this paper targets a limited area of Old French syntax. I offer it not only as a modest contribution to the grammatical history of French, but also, and perhaps more importantly, as a case study for a broader ...

Author: Marinel Gerritsen

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter

ISBN: 9783110886047

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 488

View: 664

TRENDS IN LINGUISTICS is a series of books that open new perspectives in our understanding of language. The series publishes state-of-the-art work on core areas of linguistics across theoretical frameworks as well as studies that provide new insights by building bridges to neighbouring fields such as neuroscience and cognitive science. TRENDS IN LINGUISTICS considers itself a forum for cutting-edge research based on solid empirical data on language in its various manifestations, including sign languages. It regards linguistic variation in its synchronic and diachronic dimensions as well as in its social contexts as important sources of insight for a better understanding of the design of linguistic systems and the ecology and evolution of language. TRENDS IN LINGUISTICS publishes monographs and outstanding dissertations as well as edited volumes, which provide the opportunity to address controversial topics from different empirical and theoretical viewpoints. High quality standards are ensured through anonymous reviewing.
Categories: Language Arts & Disciplines

The Paradox of Grammatical Change

The Paradox of Grammatical Change

(Middle French) “for he goes to sleep” In Old French, the object clitic le in (9a) would be positioned in front of ... a corresponding syntactic functional category the changing quality of which is the core of the development should be ...

Author: Ulrich Detges

Publisher: John Benjamins Publishing

ISBN: 9789027291639

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 252

View: 344

Recent years have seen intense debates between formal (generative) and functional linguists, particularly with respect to the relation between grammar and usage. This debate is directly relevant to diachronic linguistics, where one and the same phenomenon of language change can be explained from various theoretical perspectives. In this, a close look at the divergent and/or convergent evolution of a richly documented language family such as Romance promises to be useful. The basic problem for any approach to language change is what Eugenio Coseriu has termed the paradox of change: if synchronically, languages can be viewed as perfectly running systems, then there is no reason why they should change in the first place. And yet, as everyone knows, languages are changing constantly. In nine case studies, a number of renowned scholars of Romance linguistics address the explanation of grammatical change either within a broadly generative or a functional framework.
Categories: Language Arts & Disciplines