Superman vs Hollywood

Superman vs  Hollywood

the director was being ultrafaithful: as originally developed by Siegel and Shuster, Superman couldn't fly. For his part, Peters loved the new gizmos. Strick's script was heavy on the toy potential—it even featured the long-shelved ...

Author: Jake Rossen

Publisher: Chicago Review Press

ISBN: 9781569765012

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 352

View: 607

Superman has fought for nearly seven decades to conquer radio, television, and film—but his battles behind the scenes have proved a far greater threat than any fictional foe. For the first time, one book unearths all the details of his turbulent adventures in Tinseltown. Based on extensive interviews with producers, screenwriters, cast members, and crew, Superman vs. Hollywood spills the beans on Marlon Brando's eccentricities; the challenges of making Superman appear to fly; the casting process that at various points had Superman being played by Sylvester Stallone, Neil Diamond, Nicolas Cage, Ashton Kutcher, and even Muhammad Ali; and the Superman movies, fashioned by such maverick filmmakers as Kevin Smith and Tim Burton, that never made it to the screen.
Categories: Performing Arts

Investigating Lois Lane

Investigating Lois Lane

Tye, Superman, 142. turned down twice her original salary ... Jake Rossen, Superman vs. Hollywood: How Fiendish Producers, Devious Directors, and Warring Writers Grounded an American Icon (Chicago: Chicago Review Press, 2008), 73.

Author: Tim Hanley

Publisher: Chicago Review Press

ISBN: 9781613732472

Category: Social Science

Page: 288

View: 177

In a universe full of superheroes, Lois Lane has fought for truth and justice for over 75 years on page and screen without a cape or tights. From her creation by Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster in 1938 to her forthcoming appearance in Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice in 2016, from helming her own comic book for twenty-six years to appearing in animated serials, live-action TV shows, and full-length movies, Lois Lane has been a paragon of journalistic integrity and the paramour of the world's strongest superhero. But her history is one of constant tension. From her earliest days, Lois yearned to make the front page of the Daily Planet, but was held back by her damsel-in-distress role. When she finally became an ace reporter, asinine lessons and her tumultuous romance with Superman dominated her storylines for decades and relegated her journalism to the background. Through it all, Lois remained a fearless and ambitious character, and today she is a beloved icon and an inspiration to many. Though her history is often troubling, Lois's journey, as revealed in Investigating Lois Lane, showcases her ability to always escape the gendered limitations of each era and of the superhero genre as a whole.
Categories: Social Science

Superman

Superman

THE BROTHERS WERE: Dooley and Engle, Superman at Fifty.' 64-65; l).miels. DC Comics: Sixty Wars, 68-69; Rossen, Superman vs. Hollywood, 7-'); and (I;ib.irg.i, The Fleischer Story, 174-77. “THE MOVIE CARTOON”: “The New Pictures," Time.

Author: Larry Tye

Publisher: Random House

ISBN: 9781588369185

Category: Social Science

Page: 432

View: 956

The first full-fledged history not just of the Man of Steel but of the creators, designers, owners, and performers who made him the icon he is today, from the New York Times bestselling author of Satchel and Bobby Kennedy “A story as American as Superman himself.”—The Washington Post Legions of fans from Boston to Buenos Aires can recite the story of the child born Kal-El, scion of the doomed planet Krypton, who was rocketed to Earth as an infant, raised by humble Kansas farmers, and rechristened Clark Kent. Known to law-abiders and evildoers alike as Superman, he was destined to become the invincible champion of all that is good and just—and a star in every medium from comic books and comic strips to radio, TV, and film. But behind the high-flying legend lies a true-to-life saga every bit as compelling, one that begins not in the far reaches of outer space but in the middle of America’s heartland. During the depths of the Great Depression, Jerry Siegel was a shy, awkward teenager in Cleveland. Raised on adventure tales and robbed of his father at a young age, Jerry dreamed of a hero for a boy and a world that desperately needed one. Together with neighborhood chum and kindred spirit Joe Shuster, young Siegel conjured a human-sized god who was everything his creators yearned to be: handsome, stalwart, and brave, able to protect the innocent, punish the wicked, save the day, and win the girl. It was on Superman’s muscle-bound back that the comic book and the very idea of the superhero took flight. Tye chronicles the adventures of the men and women who kept Siegel and Shuster’s “Man of Tomorrow” aloft and vitally alive through seven decades and counting. Here are the savvy publishers and visionary writers and artists of comics’ Golden Age who ushered the red-and-blue-clad titan through changing eras and evolving incarnations; and the actors—including George Reeves and Christopher Reeve—who brought the Man of Steel to life on screen, only to succumb themselves to all-too-human tragedy in the mortal world. Here too is the poignant and compelling history of Siegel and Shuster’s lifelong struggle for the recognition and rewards rightly due to the architects of a genuine cultural phenomenon. From two-fisted crimebuster to über-patriot, social crusader to spiritual savior, Superman—perhaps like no other mythical character before or since—has evolved in a way that offers a Rorschach test of his times and our aspirations. In this deftly realized appreciation, Larry Tye reveals a portrait of America over seventy years through the lens of that otherworldly hero who continues to embody our best selves.
Categories: Social Science

Panel to the Screen

Panel to the Screen

Jake Rossen, Superman vs. Hollywood: How Fiendish Producers, Devious Directors, and Warring Writers Grounded an American Icon (Chicago: Chicago Review Press, 2008), 24. 22. The film was edited and aired on television as two episodes of ...

Author: Drew Morton

Publisher: Univ. Press of Mississippi

ISBN: 9781496809797

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 208

View: 764

Over the past forty years, American film has entered into a formal interaction with the comic book. Such comic book adaptations as Sin City, 300, and Scott Pilgrim vs. the World have adopted components of their source materials' visual style. The screen has been fractured into panels, the photographic has given way to the graphic, and the steady rhythm of cinematic time has evolved into a far more malleable element. In other words, films have begun to look like comics. Yet, this interplay also occurs in the other direction. In order to retain cultural relevancy, comic books have begun to look like films. Frank Miller's original Sin City comics are indebted to film noir while Stephen King's The Dark Tower series could be a Sergio Leone spaghetti western translated onto paper. Film and comic books continuously lean on one another to reimagine their formal attributes and stylistic possibilities. In Panel to the Screen, Drew Morton examines this dialogue in its intersecting and rapidly changing cultural, technological, and industrial contexts. Early on, many questioned the prospect of a "low" art form suited for children translating into "high" art material capable of drawing colossal box office takes. Now the naysayers are as quiet as the queued crowds at Comic-Cons are massive. Morton provides a nuanced account of this phenomenon by using formal analysis of the texts in a real-world context of studio budgets, grosses, and audience reception.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Movie Comics

Movie Comics

This account has never been confirmed elsewhere, and in a personal correspondence with Jake Rossen, author of Superman vs. Hollywood (Chicago: Chicago Review Press, 2008), he noted how he suspects the report may have been related to the ...

Author: Blair Davis

Publisher: Rutgers University Press

ISBN: 9780813572284

Category: Art

Page: 288

View: 326

As Christopher Nolan’s Batman films and releases from the Marvel Cinematic Universe have regularly topped the box office charts, fans and critics alike might assume that the “comic book movie” is a distinctly twenty-first-century form. Yet adaptations of comics have been an integral part of American cinema from its very inception, with comics characters regularly leaping from the page to the screen and cinematic icons spawning comics of their own. Movie Comics is the first book to study the long history of both comics-to-film and film-to-comics adaptations, covering everything from silent films starring Happy Hooligan to sound films and serials featuring Dick Tracy and Superman to comic books starring John Wayne, Gene Autry, Bob Hope, Abbott & Costello, Alan Ladd, and Dean Martin and Jerry Lewis. With a special focus on the Classical Hollywood era, Blair Davis investigates the factors that spurred this media convergence, as the film and comics industries joined forces to expand the reach of their various brands. While analyzing this production history, he also tracks the artistic coevolution of films and comics, considering the many formal elements that each medium adopted and adapted from the other. As it explores our abiding desire to experience the same characters and stories in multiple forms, Movie Comics gives readers a new appreciation for the unique qualities of the illustrated page and the cinematic moving image.
Categories: Art

Superman

Superman

Superman vs. Hollywood. Chicago Review Press Inc, 2008, ISBN 978-1-55652731-9 1051http://supermanhomepage.com 1052http://www.hometheaterforum.com/chat/chat.html 1053http://www.geocities.com/dmwc ...

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Publisher: PediaPress

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Adapting Superman

Adapting Superman

The Adventures of Superman, episode 1316, Mutual Broadcasting System, New York City, 20 June 1946. ... Superman vs. Hollywood: How Fiendish Producers, Devious Directors and Warring Writers Grounded an American Icon.

Author: John Darowski

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 9781476642390

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 287

View: 795

Almost immediately after his first appearance in comic books in June 1938, Superman began to be adapted to other media. The subsequent decades have brought even more adaptations of the Man of Steel, his friends, family, and enemies in film, television, comic strip, radio, novels, video games, and even a musical. The rapid adaptation of the Man of Steel occurred before the character and storyworld were fully developed on the comic book page, allowing the adaptations an unprecedented level of freedom and adaptability. The essays in this collection provide specific insight into the practice of adapting Superman from comic books to other media and cultural contexts through a variety of methods, including social, economic, and political contexts. Authors touch on subjects such as the different international receptions to the characters, the evolution of both Clark Kent's character and Superman's powers, the importance of the radio, how the adaptations interact with issues such as racism and Cold War paranoia, and the role of fan fiction in the franchise. By applying a wide range of critical approaches to adaption and Superman, this collection offers new insights into our popular entertainment and our cultural history.
Categories: Literary Criticism

How He Man Mastered the Universe

How He Man Mastered the Universe

Jake Rossen, Superman Vs. Hollywood: How Fiendish Producers, Devious Directors, and Warring Writers Grounded an American Icon (Chicago: Chicago Review Press, 2008), p. 1. 9. Jake Rossen, Superman Vs. Hollywood: How Fiendish Producers, ...

Author: Brian C. Baer

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 9781476627069

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 228

View: 648

Elaborate cinematic universes and sophisticated marketing tie-ins are commonplace in entertainment today. It’s easy to forget that the transmedia trend began in 1982 with a barbarian action figure. He-Man and the other characters in Mattel’s popular Masters of the Universe toy line quickly found their way into comic books, video games, multiple television series and a Hollywood film. The original animated series (1983–1985) was the first based on an action figure, and the cult classic Masters of the Universe (1987) was the first toy-inspired live-action feature film. But it wasn’t easy. He-Man faced adversaries more dangerous than Skeletor: entertainment lawyers, Hollywood executives, even the Reagan administration. The heroes and villains of Eternia did more than shape the childhoods of the toy-buying public—they formed the modern entertainment landscape.
Categories: Performing Arts

Wonder Woman Unbound

Wonder Woman Unbound

The Curious History of the World's Most Famous Heroine Tim Hanley. Superman vs. Hollywood How Fiendish Producers, Devious Directors, and Warring Writers Grounded an American Icon ' ...

Author: Tim Hanley

Publisher: Chicago Review Press

ISBN: 9781613749128

Category: Social Science

Page: 320

View: 567

With her golden lasso and her bullet-deflecting bracelets, Wonder Woman is a beloved icon of female strength in a world of male superheroes. But this close look at her history portrays a complicated heroine who is more than just a female Superman. The original Wonder Woman was ahead of her time, advocating female superiority and the benefits of matriarchy in the 1940s. At the same time, her creator filled the comics with titillating bondage imagery, and Wonder Woman was tied up as often as she saved the world. In the 1950s, Wonder Woman begrudgingly continued her superheroic mission, wishing she could settle down with her boyfriend instead, all while continually hinting at hidden lesbian leanings. While other female characters stepped forward as women’s lib took off in the late 1960s, Wonder Woman fell backwards, losing her superpowers and flitting from man to man. Ms. magazine and Lynda Carter restored Wonder Woman’s feminist strength in the 1970s, turning her into a powerful symbol as her checkered past was quickly forgotten. Exploring this lost history as well as her modern incarnations adds new dimensions to the world’s most beloved female character, and Wonder Woman Unbound delves into her comic book and its spin-offs as well as the myriad motivations of her creators to showcase the peculiar journey that led to Wonder Woman’s iconic status.
Categories: Social Science

The American Superhero Encyclopedia of Caped Crusaders in History

The American Superhero  Encyclopedia of Caped Crusaders in History

Superman vs. Hollywood: How Fiendish Producers, Devious Directors, and Warring Writers Grounded an American Icon. Chicago: Chicago Review Press. Tucker, Reed. 2017. Slugfest: Inside the Epic 50-Year Battle Between Marvel and DC.

Author: Richard A. Hall

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 9781440861246

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 370

View: 575

This compilation of essential information on 100 superheroes from comic book issues, various print and online references, and scholarly analyses provides readers all of the relevant material on superheroes in one place. • Examines in detail how superheroes and superheroines have appeared in comics and other media over the decades • Shows how superheroes and superheroines have reflected the hopes, fears, and values of American society at any given period • Provides scholarly material that gives readers additional important historical context in five essays • Ensures that diverse and obscure superheroes and superheroines are given equal coverage
Categories: Literary Criticism